Search results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 5,343 items for :

  • "middle class" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Crafting a study on Britain’s Black middle class
Meghji Ali

1 Introduction – Taking off the colourblind goggles: crafting a study on Britain’s Black middle class I n the summer of 2017, I was involved in a back-and-forth email conversation with someone whom I had been trying to interview for seven months. I received an email late at night, inviting me to an event run by the Powerlist Foundation, a foundation composed of the most ‘powerful’ Black Britons. It read Hi Ali, I have been really poor with communication and I am so sorry. We begin our Annual Summer Leadership Programme, in partnership with BT, tomorrow and I

in Black middle class Britannia
Meghji Ali

6 Race, class, and culture in the British racialised social system O ne text I often turn to in my sociological writing is Becker’s Tricks of the Trade.1 As Becker claims, one question that sociologists must continually ask themselves is simply ‘So what?’2 I use this chapter to address this ‘so what?’ question – or as Du Bois puts it, ‘the meaning of all this’ question 3 – looking both backwards and forwards. I look backwards by reviewing how the data presented in this book makes contributions towards the micro field of Black middle-class studies, as well as to

in Black middle class Britannia
Remaking middle-class hegemony
Christy Kulz

7 Urban chaos and the imagined other: remaking middle-class hegemony While Chapters 5 and 6 explored how students navigated and negotiated Dreamfields’ conveyor belt, where middle-class and mostly white students were positioned as a buffer zone against urban chaos, this chapter examines parents’ orientations to the institution. Responses to the urban chaos discourse show how parents and students conceptualise their positions within this imagined Urbanderry landscape. Discourses of pathology shape the relationships developed between parents and teachers

in Factories for learning
Middle-class identity and documentary film
Thomas Austin

5 Approaching the invisible centre: middle-class identity and documentary film So far in this book I have considered various engagements with screen documentary made by viewers other than myself. In this chapter I turn attention to some of my own responses to documentary films, and explore how my identity, particularly its middleclass aspect, has shaped these reactions. The purpose behind this move is not to wallow in narcissism, nor to ‘restore’ a middleclass, white and male subjectivity to the centre stage of film and media studies – if it has ever been truly

in Watching the world
Megan Smitley

2 The feminine public sphere The feminine public sphere represents the discourses and activities that middle-class female activists used to pursue their socio-political reforming goals. Between 1870 and 1914, suffragists, female temperance reformers and Liberal women in central, urban Scotland entered public discourse to legitimise middle-class women’s work in the public sphere. The SWTN, WSJ and the SLWM indicate the type of arguments middleclass women employed to justify their public roles. Separate spheres was a central discursive notion in the 1870 to 1914

in The feminine public sphere
Abstract only
Middle-class men and the First World War
Laura Ugolini

Introduction: Middle-class men and the First World War Decades after the end of the conflict, F. W. M. Drew recalled that in 1917, at the age of thirteen, he had entered ‘HMS Conway, the naval training base near Liverpool’. He had ‘fully expected to be able to take an active part in the war, but the following year it was all over. Still, several of my fellow trainees, lads of sixteen and seventeen who had graduated and gone to sea, never returned’. He added that ‘the toll had been so terrible that no one dared speak of their experiences. Only those like myself

in Civvies
Abstract only
Consuming traditional middle-class culture
Meghji Ali

3 White spaces: consuming traditional middle-class culture I t was February 2017, and I was in Somerset House, a famous art gallery, for a photography exhibition entitled The Eye of Modern Mali. I recounted the following experience in my fieldwork journal, while the memory was still fresh in my mind: I enter the South Wing, take a moment to orient myself and walk toward Sibidé’s photography exhibition The Eye of Modern Mali. I decide I’d like to go to the bathroom first, so walk towards it, clearly signposted, placed right next to the café. Then I have my first

in Black middle class Britannia
Megan Smitley

3 Temperance reform and the feminine public sphere The reform programme of the BWTASCU reflected contemporary middle-class reforming goals, yet the particular contributions of the BWTASCU towards meeting these goals sought to feminise middleclass civic and public life. Through an exploration of key elements of female temperance reform such as, leisure reform, inebriate homes and the professionalisation of female associationalism this chapter seeks to provide a fresh perspective on middle-class women’s contribution to a middle-class identity based on

in The feminine public sphere
Abstract only
David Lockwood

's intended audience. It was the ordinary readers of the Evening Standard to whom his work was primarily directed. Who were they? According to Low, ‘The Evening Standard … was a West End sale among the middle-classes. The Tory clubman's evening paper.’ 55 A. J. P. Taylor, in his biography of Low's employer, described Evening Standard readers as ‘the well-to-do of London and the suburbs’. 56 He added: ‘newsvendors, it is said, have always known that

in Comic empires
Abstract only
Kate Middleton, ‘middle-classness’ and family values
Laura Clancy

, heteronormative and (upper-)middle-class family. The historian Patricia Holland suggests that these portraits are often idealised, ensuring that the middle-class family is coded as aspirational and desirable. 4 But considering that traditional family photograph albums have been displaced by digital cultures, their evocation on Instagram by the Cambridges is bound up with nostalgia for traditional family values. It appeals to the nuclear, middle-class family when families and class identifications in Britain are becoming more

in Running the Family Firm