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Martin Heale

miracles of St Benedict. 98 Cf. below, p. 162. 99 © The British Library. All rights reserved. 100 100 I.e. the sign of the cross

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535
Martin Heale

A hospital for the poor. 21 See above, p. 158 n. 2. 22 © The British Library. All rights reserved. 23 The celebrated relic, the Holy Blood of

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535
Rosemary Horrox

P. Vinogradoff (ed), Oxford Studies in Social and Legal History V, Oxford, 1916 , pp. 72-80. Ballard, by contrast, argued for two thirds mortality in some of the Winchester manors: pp. 199, 213. 8 J. C. Russell, British Medieval Population , Albuquerque, 1948, pp. 230, 367. The

in The Black Death
Abstract only
Anthony Musson
and
Edward Powell

, Manchester University Press, 1999), pp. 74-93; Heraldry, Pageantry and Social Display , ed. P. Coss and M. Keen (Woodbridge, Boydell Press, 2002). 4 This can be seen in the titles of various books and papers, for example: Communities and Courts in Britain, 1150-1900 , ed. C. W. Brooks and M. Lobban (London, Hambledon

in Crime, Law and Society in the Later Middle Ages
Abstract only
Jennifer Ward

they have left behind shows their interests centred on their immediate family group. 32. An excerpt from the Dunmow chronicle showing the genealogy of the early lords of Little Dunmow priory, Essex 12 [From British Library, London, Cotton MS. Cleopatra CIII, fo. 291r; in Latin] 1111 William Baynard, of whom Lady Juga [Baynard] held

in Women of the English Nobility and Gentry, 1066-1500
Rosemary Horrox

northern Europe: O. Benedictow, Plague in the late medieval Nordic Countries , Oslo, 1992 . 7 J. F. D. Shrewsbury, A History of Bubonic Plague in the British Isles , Cambridge, 1970 ; Twigg, Black Death . 8

in The Black Death
Martin Heale

England, and versions of each can be found in lay collections of devotional material from this period. Translated from The English Register of Godstow Nunnery, near Oxford, Written about 1450 , ed. A. Clark, 3 vols, Early English Text Society, 129–30, 142 (1905–11), I, 4–5 (English); and from British Library, Sloane MS 747, fos 46v, 49v, 65v

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535
Martin Heale

corrections of transcription from British Library, Add. MS 14848) from W. Dugdale, Monasticon Anglicanum , ed. J. Caley, H. Ellis and B. Bandinel (London, 1846), III, 113n (Latin). Concerning the coming of King Henry VI to the monastery of [Bury] St Edmunds When the most serene prince and lord, the lord Henry VI, by the grace of God king of England and

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535
Elisabeth van Houts

Cotentin (the peninsula) with some Irish/Scandinavian settlement in the tip of the peninsula as a result of immigration by Irish/Anglo/Scandinavian people from Britain, especially from the northern isles of Scotland. It is of course interesting that, if we can believe the skaldic poetry and sagas, the ruling clan came from Norway (via the Orkneys and Scotland) while the names of the ‘ordinary

in The Normans in Europe
Paul Fouracre
and
Richard A. Gerberding

York, 1967 ), pp. 230–2. Basic too are the collections in both H. B. Clarke and M. Brennan (eds.), Columbanus and Merovingian Monasticism. British Archeological Reports , International Series, 113 (Oxford, 1981 ), and in H. Löwe (ed.), Die Iren und Europa im frühen Mittelalter , vol. 2 (Stuttgart, 1982 ). 73

in Late Merovingian France