Search results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 100 items for :

  • Manchester Medieval Studies x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Jennifer Ward

, 1153 [From British Library, London, Cotton MS. Nero E vii, fo. 8r; in Latin] Geoffrey de Favarches greets all the faithful people of holy Church which is in Christ. Be it known to you that I have given and granted in perpetual alms to God and St Mary and to Edwy my clerk the chapel which my mother founded in Walsingham in honour of Mary, ever Virgin, in order to establish the religious order

in Women of the English Nobility and Gentry, 1066-1500
Abstract only
The end of Edward III’s reign, 1376–77
Alison K. McHardy

important document, which presents considerable difficulties of translation, for it shows the problems that historical researchers sometimes encounter. British Library, Cotton Charter XVI 63. Printed: Michael Bennett, ‘Edward III’s entail and the succession to the crown, 1376–1471’, EHR 103 (1998), 580–609; text: 607–9. … land

in The reign of Richard II
Abstract only
Jennifer Ward

together with Margery, the daughter and heir of Richard de Raimecurt, 1154–61 [From British Library, London, Sloane MS. 986, The Chartulary of the Braybroke Family, fo. 21; in Latin] Henry, king of England, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and count of Anjou, greets his archbishops, bishops, abbots, earls, barons, justices, sheriffs, officials, and all his faithful men of

in Women of the English Nobility and Gentry, 1066-1500
Abstract only
Jennifer Ward

services belonging to me from the aforesaid land. Witnessed by Robert my chaplain, Robert my knight of Barton, Robert my steward, Mabel my daughter, Aderiz Heaved. 14 107. Letter of Roger de Clare earl of Hertford to his grandmother, Adeliza de Clermont, her steward and men, soon after 1152 15 [From British Library, London, Cotton MS. Appendix xxi, fo. 22r; in Latin

in Women of the English Nobility and Gentry, 1066-1500
Martin Heale

thought necessary for reform by the external visitor, following his inspection of the convent. It is revealing not only about the state of religion in the monastery, but also about the ecclesiastical authorities’ attitudes to female monasteries in fifteenth-century England. Translated (with minor corrections of transcription from British Library, Cotton Charter V

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535
Abstract only
Martin Heale

miracles of St Benedict. 98 Cf. below, p. 162. 99 © The British Library. All rights reserved. 100 100 I.e. the sign of the cross

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535
Martin Heale

A hospital for the poor. 21 See above, p. 158 n. 2. 22 © The British Library. All rights reserved. 23 The celebrated relic, the Holy Blood of

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535
Rosemary Horrox

P. Vinogradoff (ed), Oxford Studies in Social and Legal History V, Oxford, 1916 , pp. 72-80. Ballard, by contrast, argued for two thirds mortality in some of the Winchester manors: pp. 199, 213. 8 J. C. Russell, British Medieval Population , Albuquerque, 1948, pp. 230, 367. The

in The Black Death
Abstract only
Anthony Musson
and
Edward Powell

, Manchester University Press, 1999), pp. 74-93; Heraldry, Pageantry and Social Display , ed. P. Coss and M. Keen (Woodbridge, Boydell Press, 2002). 4 This can be seen in the titles of various books and papers, for example: Communities and Courts in Britain, 1150-1900 , ed. C. W. Brooks and M. Lobban (London, Hambledon

in Crime, Law and Society in the Later Middle Ages
Abstract only
Jennifer Ward

they have left behind shows their interests centred on their immediate family group. 32. An excerpt from the Dunmow chronicle showing the genealogy of the early lords of Little Dunmow priory, Essex 12 [From British Library, London, Cotton MS. Cleopatra CIII, fo. 291r; in Latin] 1111 William Baynard, of whom Lady Juga [Baynard] held

in Women of the English Nobility and Gentry, 1066-1500