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Stavros Stavrides

explains in his interview included in this chapter, urban movements need to be “urban experimenters” and “urban dreamers.” This means that they need to be offered the means and opportunities to dream of different possible spaces and to experiment with different spatialities and human relations. One needs to be educated, to be able to develop these capacities, to creatively think about and experience space. But this kind of education is not like the authoritarian education which perpetuates the division between manual and intellectual labor and hierarchies connected to

in Common spaces of urban emancipation
Abstract only
Stavros Stavrides

” (Nadal-Melsió 2008: 170). This is actually an approach to human emancipation that actively supports the creative capacities of people. We know that there are some harshly imposed limits to these capacities in present capitalist urban societies (2008: 170) However, not only explicit resistances to the inequalities of those urban worlds exist but also everyday collectively organized survival tactics, which produce potentialities of different forms of social organization. 1­ 8 Common spaces of urban emancipation In many parts of the world the poor, the excluded, the

in Common spaces of urban emancipation
Marcos P. Dias

historical accounts of avant-garde movements, I argue that the Brazilian Neo-Concretist movement is of key importance to the performative turn. It emerged out of the Manifesto Neoconcreto (1959), defending ‘freedom of experimentation, return to expressive intentions and the restoration of subjectivity’ (Enciclopédia Itaú Cultural, 2013 ; my translation). It sought the ‘recovery of the creative potential of the artist – no longer considered an inventor of industrial prototypes – and the effective incorporation of the spectator – who, by touching and manipulating the

in The machinic city
Open Access (free)
Mapping times
Alex Gekker, Sam Hind, Sybille Lammes, Chris Perkins, and Clancy Wilmott

, temporary fixes and wholesale reboots have been developed to combat such issues. Emergent themes The chapters in this book show that digital mapping needs to be viewed from an interdisciplinary angle, so as to best grasp what it means in terms of temporality. We have already established that temporality has been explored from many different academic perspectives. Furthermore, multiple positions, methodologies and assumptions are needed to do justice to the nature of digital mappings; being at once creative practices, media, cartographies and technologies. The rich

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Heterogeneous temporalities, algorithmic frames and subjective time in geomedia
Pablo Abend

universe, every visual aspect can be brought into focus. The functional shift of the camera eye can be termed a ‘mise-en-space’ (Jones, 2007: 227) in order to distinguish it from the traditional cinematic art of mise-en-scène. As a result of this shift, the camera evolves from being a creative element to a primal tool of creativity itself (Jones, 2007). With the interactive virtual camera, framing is no longer delegated to an authorised alliance of operator and apparatus. The operator-apparatus becomes a mediator by order of the spectator-user, who is now in charge of

in Time for mapping
Considerations and consequences
Thomas Sutherland

of flows seems to take on a particular urgency in an age when the solidity and permanence of traditional socio-political structures upon which we have usually depended seems to be melting away in the furious creative destruction of neoliberal, globalised, digital capitalism. We might also connect it to changing patterns of representation engendered by new, ubiquitous forms of media – as Robert Hassan (2012: 179) writes: [t]he words we now interface with in social networking, in our news reading, in our working days and, above all, in our education are fluxual

in Time for mapping
Exploring the session space
Daithí Kearney

performances have included musical events organised by Irish embassies in Mexico and China, as well as cultural festivals in countries where Ireland does not maintain close diplomatic ties, such as Venezuela. In all instances, the arts provide a powerful reference point for Ireland. Home again The internationalisation of Irish art and cultural identity has led in turn to a desire to rediscover local meaning and a sense of belonging (Gray, 1997; Kearney, 1997). Lovering (1998) notes the importance of spatial proximity for creative musical activity while O’Shea (2008) points

in Spacing Ireland
Open Access (free)
Back to the future
Alex Gekker, Sam Hind, Sybille Lammes, Chris Perkins, and Clancy Wilmott

assemblages of digital technologies, their constant shifting employment can lead to an impression of time ‘flying’, and of an inevitable mutability. But the very same technologies can also be aligned and mastered to re-appropriate experiences and to stitch memories together in novel ways. This section was about reflection and looking back, to track what has happened on the map and create ‘bricolages’ with their own tempos and histories. Authors in this part of the book discussed daily and creative practices that actually address some of the questions that the first section

in Time for mapping
Tim Robinson as narrative scholar
Christine Cusick

ultimately achieved, and is moreover recognized as unachievable’.29 In the Connemara trilogy there seems to be an elegiac tone attached to this impossibility, not because Robinson seeks or even desires this unity, but because of the effect of this fracture on the earth: As to our own effects on the ground we stand on, our powers of creative destruction and destructive creativity are enmeshed inextricably … A new species has arrived, carrying a dreadful weapon, the intellect. An arms race has begun, the axe evolves from stone to bronze to iron to steel. Great woods with all

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
Art and the temporalities of geomedia
Gavin MacDonald

purposeful degradation of the consumer signal in May 2000, a function known as ‘Selective Availability’, meant accurate GPS receivers became cheaply available.3 This was a crucial move in establishing GPS as a ubiquitous consumer technology, and it opened a space for creative activity. For Polak and the other figures associated with ‘locative media’ as it emerged in the early 2000s, technologies had to be hacked together: Amsterdam RealTime’s participants carried a satchel with a PDA (Personal Digital Assistant) phone attached to a GPS signal receiver that required an

in Time for mapping