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Ariane Agunsoye, Michelle Groenewald, Danielle Guizzo, and Kamal Ramburuth-Hurt

Francesca Rhys-Williams, a contributor to this book, encountered stigma from other students, as they assumed she had chosen economics because she wanted ‘to make lots of money’. Frustrated with this stereotype, Francesca was compelled to carry on studying economics to prove it can be a force for good in society. With this goal, she and many others

in Reclaiming economics for future generations
Joe Earle, Cahal Moran, and Zach Ward-Perkins

Chapter 5 Rediscovering liberal education Economics as a pluralist, liberal education [The purpose of universities] is not to make skilful lawyers, or physicians, or engineers, but capable and cultivated human beings. John Stuart Mill, 18671 The School again is not a place of technical education fitting you for one and only one profession. It makes you better for every occupation, it does help you get on in life … But you will lose most of the value of the School if you regard it solely as a means of getting on in life. Regard it as a means of learning, to

in The econocracy
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Joe Earle, Cahal Moran, and Zach Ward-Perkins

McDonnell, made a highly publicised move to establish an Economic Advisory Committee in 2015, which included some of the world’s most prominent economists, in order to establish his economic credibility.2 It is unheard of for a political party to win an election without being seen as economically credible. In the build-up to the UK’s 2015 general election the economy was the most discussed issue in the news apart from the election itself.3 Politicians and commentators try to dismiss their opponents’ policies as being ‘good politics; bad economics’,4 claiming that these

in The econocracy
Brototi Roy and Francesca Rhys-Williams

In this chapter, we argue that economics has not done enough to prioritise democracy or self-determination in economic development. This builds on our argument in the last chapter , that globalisation has for many countries prescribed a single predetermined pathway from ‘poor’ to ‘developed’, rather than supporting countries to chart their own

in Reclaiming economics for future generations

. Defying this convention, Brototi moved to Calcutta, India, to pursue a degree in economics, because she wanted to understand and address the socioeconomic inequalities she saw in her country. Straight away she became uncomfortable with what she was being taught without yet understanding why. Here we turn to explore the source of that discomfort, which so many economics students

in Reclaiming economics for future generations
Share and share alike
Author: Amy Harris

Since spousal and child-parent relationships have undergone enormous changes, they are subject to weighty legal and religious control, and exert a powerful influence on people's cultural imagination. The emphasis on marriage and parents and children has generated a rich and deep historiography. This book outlines the contours of Georgian siblinghood to understand its specific advantages and disadvantages because it was in this period that lived siblinghood began to lose the public recognition of its meaning and function while fictive siblinghood increased its abstract reach. It suggests that couples and parents had other important and demanding family relations, relations they had to negotiate and combine with spousal and parental duties. In particular, it draws attention to the sibling relationships that supported, supplemented, and even supplanted marital and parental relations. The book considers siblings as children and how they learned the role of sibling in both familial and social settings. Parental advice literature and parents' own accounts demonstrate that mothers and fathers were expected to teach morals and class- and gender-specific behaviour and to treat their children fairly. The book explores injunctions about friendship, affection, and love between siblings, revealing that that for siblings, love, affection, and friendship meant ideas of unity, solidarity, and unwavering support. Discussing sibling economics, the book focuses on the familial, material, social, and financial work done by siblings, particularly within and between households. Shifting attention to sibling relations reveals the essential labour of and contribution of siblings to early modern family economics and politics.

Problems of polysemy and idealism
Andrew Sayer

2 Markets, embeddedness and trust: problems of polysemy and idealism Andrew Sayer Introduction In this paper I develop a critique of certain approaches to markets and firm behaviour in economics and economic sociology. There are two main targets of the critique. The first concerns some common approaches to markets and the nature of firms in relation to them. Here I argue that the diverse uses of the term ‘market’ in contemporary lay and academic discourse cause confusion. Also problematic in both mainstream and institutional economics is the tendency to treat

in Market relations and the competitive process
Open Access (free)
Stan Metcalfe and Alan Warde

9 Conclusion Stan Metcalfe and Alan Warde In conclusion we draw together and evaluate a number of the themes raised in this volume and begin to sketch an agenda for future research about markets and the competitive process. Happily, this book resides within a now-flourishing broader stream of ideas at the interface between economics and sociology. Some of this new work signals the resurrection of economic sociology, while other aspects of it emanate from within the literature on innovation processes and, more generally, from evolutionary economics. There has

in Market relations and the competitive process
Open Access (free)
Stan Metcalfe and Alan Warde

1 Introduction Stan Metcalfe and Alan Warde There has been increasing interest and debate in recent years on the instituted nature of economic processes in general and the related ideas of the market and the competitive process in particular. This debate lies at the interface between two largely independent disciplines, economics and sociology, and reflects an attempt to bring the two fields of discourse more closely together. In many ways this is to return to a previous age when the study of institutional arrangements was at the centre of the study of

in Market relations and the competitive process
Richard R. Nelson

1 On the complexities and limits of market organisation Richard R. Nelson Introduction The close of the twentieth century saw a virtual canonisation of markets as the best, indeed the only really effective, way to govern an economic system. The market organisation being canonised was simple and pure, along the lines of the standard textbook model in economics. For-profit firms are the vehicle of production and provision. Given what suppliers offer, free choice on the part of customers, who decide on the basis of their own knowledge and preferences where to spend

in Market relations and the competitive process