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Paul Currion

quantitative data are more highly valued than other approaches or knowledges’ ( Read et al. , 2016 : 7). At a meta level the ethos of humanitarianism innovation itself is suspect. The start-up mantra of ‘move fast and break things’ (the original motto of Facebook) is the opposite of what we want to achieve, since breaking things is how humanitarian crises are created, not how they are resolved – and the ethics behind such a motto are questionable ( Sandvik et al. , 2017 ). Yet there

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Planned Obsolescence of Medical Humanitarian Missions: An Interview with Tony Redmond, Professor and Practitioner of International Emergency Medicine and Co-founder of HCRI and UK-Med

community. They are all being developed in established medical settings, so we should just draw on these technologies. It is the application and to know that you can use the technology in a humanitarian setting that is the problem; it’s conceptual. I know professionalising the humanitarian sector is again another issue that poses problems for some people about what is meant by that. Well, I would like to think that you could combine professionalism and humanitarianism. There

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editors’ Introduction
Tanja R. Müller and Gemma Sou

efficiency, terms arguably more expected in a business environment than the field of humanitarianism. This has resulted, maybe not so unexpectedly, in a state of affairs where the main focus of innovation in relation to humanitarian action has remained on technical fixes or the development of new products, rather than a broader conception that interrogates innovation in a more holistic way, related to overarching humanitarian principles, strategies and partnerships. This understanding of innovation as a

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Róisín Read

sector are still the minority of research into gender and humanitarianism (see, for example, Ticktin, 2011 ; Martin de Almagro, 2017 ; Houldey, 2019 ; Partis-Jennings, 2019 ). The articles in this special issue seek to contribute to this growing body of critical research and reflection. Though each of the contributions offers distinct insights, a number of important cross-cutting themes emerge from the issue as a whole. A key focus throughout this issue is on the need to move beyond thinking about gender as

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Valérie Gorin and Sönke Kunkel

entanglements between visual media and humanitarianism. Meanwhile, other historians, international relations scholars, and political theorists have shed much light on the visual politics of aid, including works on the innocent figure of the child to depoliticize controversial contexts and build empathetic responses to distant suffering ( Burman, 1994 ; Campbell, 2012 ; Fehrenbach, 2015 ; Gigliotti, 2018 ; Gorin, 2015 ; Taithe, 2010 ), the dehistoricization and feminization of the refugee

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Phoebe Shambaugh

After a special curated issue on humanitarian history and communications ( JHA , 3:2) and a themed one on the politics of infectious disease ( JHA , 3:3), it is therefore apt that the Journal of Humanitarian Affairs publishes a general issue of articles that challenge us to think with both new research methods and partnerships, and to reflect on the events which have brought us here. If there is a thread which runs through this issue, perhaps it is most concretely focused on the relationship between humanitarianism – as an ideology, a discourse and a practice

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
The Politics of Infectious Disease
Duncan McLean and Michaël Neuman

contribution Jeffrey Flynn reviews two books, Humanitarian Photography: A History (2015) and The Biafran War and Postcolonial Humanitarianism: Spectacles of Suffering (2017). While his commentary on ethical questions over the use of images is particularly salient today, almost as striking are his observations on how the challenge of framing human suffering ‘has been debated ever since the pain of others could be captured on camera’. The pitfalls of humanitarian imagery are thus noted, as are

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Visual Advocacy in the Early Decades of Humanitarian Cinema
Valérie Gorin

Introduction When looking at the history of visual humanitarianism, one surprisingly realizes that film history has only scarcely been covered, while scholarly interest has increased in humanitarian campaigns on digital media ( Cottle and Cooper, 2015 ). Yet, debates that emerged in the 1980s about the paradigm of distant suffering, immersion and chronotopic engagement by means of communication technologies, such as virtual reality, remain to be examined through historical patterns. In the age of mass communication, aid agencies turned very early to motion

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanity and Solidarity
Tanja R. Müller and Róisín Read

This is the second general issue of the Journal of Humanitarian Affairs , following in the wake of two themed issues on Extreme Violence, and Gender and Humanitarianism respectively. It comes at a time when COVID-19 has resulted in rising global inequalities, including those based on gender, and the spectre of famine has returned to public consciousness – for example, in northern Ethiopia. Gender and violence – the latter of a more indirect form – both feature in this issue, as do

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Marie-Luce Desgrandchamps, Lasse Heerten, Arua Oko Omaka, Kevin O'Sullivan, and Bertrand Taithe

the conflict has become the object of global humanitarian concern, a global media and protest event. One of the many things that is interesting in a case like Biafra is that it allows us to study the ways humanitarianism depoliticises conflicts. However, at the same time, I think it is important to contextualise such humanitarian campaigns and representations within the different relevant political contexts that helped generate such an event; that is what I have tried to do with

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs