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Syrithe Pugh

style of government which had been so controversially introduced by Julius Caesar and would be continued by Augustus, since ‘In the Republic, only Roma, the Roman people, could be said to rule the world, not an individual 45 Pliny, Natural History 2.93–4: admodum Faustus Divo Augusto iudicatus ab ipso …. namque his verbis in gaudium prodit is: ‘…. eo sidere significari vulgus credidit Caesaris animam inter deorum inmortalium numina receptam …’ haec ille in publicum; interiore gaudio sibi illum natum seque in eo nasci interpretatus est. et, si verum fatemur, salutare

in Spenser and Virgil
Syrithe Pugh

‘the God of shepheards Tityrus … / Who taught me homely, as I can, to make’ (81–2), seeming to align his plaints with the genre of pastoral elegy. Theocritus’ first idyll, we remember, was focused on an elegy for the legendary shepherd Daphnis, himself a singer ‘whom the Muses loved’ (Idyll 1.141).40 Virgil imitates this eclogue twice, both in Eclogue 5’s elegy for a ‘Daphnis’ probably (and traditionally read as) representing Julius Caesar, which makes no reference to Daphnis as a poet, and in Eclogue 10, where the poet Gallus laments his imagined or metaphorical

in Spenser and Virgil
Abstract only
Syrithe Pugh

want to cry ‘Why keep me waiting, Fortune? Enter the lists! Behold, I am ready for you!’ (64.2–4) Though Sextius is long dead (he lived in the time of Julius Caesar), he is ‘alive’ and ‘free’ in several senses. As a ‘real Stoic’, who knows the true value of things, he is free from subjection to Fortune and the body, and to enjoy such mental freedom is to be most alive. Since he has actually died, he has been liberated from the trammels of the body in a more literal and Platonic sense, too. As Seneca explains in the very next letter (65), while pondering the

in Conversations
Metaphor and mental space in Ralegh’s History of the World
Michael Booth

miseries’. Julius Caesar, IV.iii.218–21. The boat departing at high tide will get you clear of the shoals. Here too, there is a compression of time to the small scale of one tidal cycle. What differs is the mapping of roles in the tidal scenario. In Raleigh’s figure, the ebbing tide is one’s life itself, one’s failing energy. In Shakespeare’s, the tide is a moving target, a passing opportunity that one must move energetically to exploit. MUP_Armitage_Ralegh.indd 211 07/10/2013 14:09 212 Michael Booth (b) overwhelms the integration principle that would otherwise

in Literary and visual Ralegh
Ralegh and the call to arms
Andrew Hiscock

Kempe, The Education of Children (1588), sig. D1r. This contention might be compared with that of Ralegh himself: ‘it is well knowne, that Rome (or perhaps all the world besides) had never nay so brave a Commander in war as Julius Caesar: and that no Roman armie was comparable unto that which served under the same Caesar.’ See History, 5.1.1.263. 19 I am indebted for these references to Rapple, Martial Heroism, 80–1. 20 For an age which had been profoundly (and violently) exercised by a prolonged interrogation of Early Stuart sovereignty, an indication of Ralegh

in Literary and visual Ralegh
Syrithe Pugh

Chapters 1 and 2 – Vives’ identification of Daphnis as Christ and Servius’ identification of Daphnis as Julius Caesar. In his hymn to the newly deified Daphnis, Virgil’s Menalcas institutes a cult, teaching his community how to worship the new god. (More than half of his song (ll. 65–80) is devoted to the altars he will set up and the annual feasts he will institute in Daphnis’ honour.) In this he resembles Colin, especially when viewed through the lens of Vives’ Christian interpretation, by which Daphnis is in fact the same god represented by Colin’s Cupid under a

in Spenser and Virgil
Semiramis and Titania
Lisa Hopkins

his now lost Latin play Caesar Interfectus was on the same theme as Julius Caesar and is sometimes suggested as a source for it). 49 Such parallels suggestively invite us to read Shakespeare’s Athens in openly English terms. While Athens is clearly identified with the civic, Spenser specifically associates Ireland with wood-lore when he has

in Goddesses and Queens
Abstract only
Mark Robson

In Shakespeare’s works, the ear is treated with an ambivalence that cannot be simply idiomatic. One of the most famous invocations of the ear is, of course, Antony’s ‘Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears!’ (3.2.65) in Julius Caesar . 2 Antony’s rhetorical display is one of the clearest examples of persuasion as force, and stands against seemingly more naive

in The sense of early modern writing
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Queen Elizabeth, and Joan La Pucelle in 1 Henry VI
Ben Spiller

; A far more glorious star thy soul will make Than Julius Caesar. (I.1.53–6) Exeter questions whether the French have brought about Henry V’s death through conjuring; and Bedford attempts to conjure a ghost. Later, Joan will evoke fiends from hell. Invocation of the

in Goddesses and Queens
Milton and the Restoration
Warren Chernaik

office of a King, His Honour, Vertue, Merit and chief Praise That for the Publick all this weight he bears. Yet he who reigns within himself, and rules Passions, Desires, and Fears, is more a King –​ Which every wise and vertuous man attains; And who attains not, ill aspires to rule Cities of men, or headstrong Multitudes, Subject himself to Anarchy within, Or lawless passions in him which he serves.63 Satan then turns to glory, prowess in arms, holding up for emulation such great classical figures as Alexander, Scipio, Pompey and Julius Caesar, ‘whom now all the

in From Republic to Restoration