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Jonathan Rayner

Second World War, 2nd edn. (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1994), pp. 326–43. 7 Correlli Barnett, Engage the Enemy More Closely: The Royal Navy in the Second World War (London: Penguin, 2001), pp. 69–70. 8 Aldgate and Richards (1994), p. 329. 9 Marcia Landy, British Genres: Cinema and Society, 1930–1960 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1991), p. 157. 10 Aldgate and Richards (1994), p. 328. 11 Landy (1991), p. 158. 12 Philip Kaplan and Jack Currie, Wolfpack: U-Boats at War 1939–1945 (London: Aurum Press, 1997), p. 73. 13 A possible historical source for

in The naval war film
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Ruth Barton

little bit repressed and kept down. People aren’t marching in the streets and burning buildings down the way maybe the Greeks let off steam about their situation. This commentary on the film chimes with the dominant critical approach to analysing Irish cinema, that is, societal. At some point, most writers in the field, myself included, have asked: what does Irish cinema tell us about Irish society? While the ‘cinema as social mirror’ model now seems simplistic, we can argue instead that the relationship between cinema and society is based on

in Irish cinema in the twenty-first century
Sarah Wright

in Cinema: The Articulation of Body and Space’, Yale French Studies, 60, 33–​50. Doane, Mary Ann (2003) ‘The Close Up: Scale and Detail in the Cinema’, differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies, 14.3, 89–​111. Faulkner, Sally (2013) A History of Spanish Film: Cinema and Society 1910–​ 2010, London: Bloomsbury. Gaines, Jane (2013) ‘Wordlessness, to be Continued …’, in Monica Dall’Asta and Victoria Duckett (eds), Women in Silent Cinema:  New Findings and Perspectives, Bologna: Dipartimento delle Arte, pp. 288–​302. García Carrión, Marta (2007) Sin

in Performance and Spanish film
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‘’Mid pleasures and palaces’
Hollie Price

Film Book Club, 1947), p. 25. 17 As pictured in S. Lee, British Film Stars at Home (London: Findon Publications, 1947) , n.p; ‘He plays what she writes’, Picture Post (4 August 1945), pp. 22–3; The neighbourly proximity of Mills and Lean is mentioned in G. D. Phillips, Beyond the Epic: The Life and Films of David Lean (Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky, 2006) , p. 67. 18 J. Richards, The Age of the Dream Palace: Cinema and Society in 1930s Britain (London: I. B. Tauris, 2010). Richards quotes a twenty-five-year-old male respondent from J

in Picturing home
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Brian McFarlane

Marcia Landy, British Genres: Cinema and Society, 1930–1960, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1991, p. 272. 27 Monthly Film Bulletin, June 1947, p. 78. 28 Lionel Collier, ‘Shop for your films’, Picturegoer, 2 August 1947, p.12. 29 Kinematograph Weekly, 19 June 1947, p. 22. 30 Robert Murphy, Realism and Tinsel: Cinema and Society in Britain 1939–48, London: Routledge, 1989, p. 182. 31 Quoted in Andrew Spicer, Sydney Box, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2006, p. 210. 32 Sydney Box, ‘Puzzle – find the director’, in Peter Noble (ed.), The British

in Four from the forties
Mapping the industrial working-class home
Hollie Price

move from the public to the private was an ‘aesthetic convention’ used in documentaries focusing on working-class homes. K. Dodd and P. Dodd, ‘Engendering the Nation: British Documentary Film, 1930–39’, in A. Higson (ed.) Dissolving Views: Key Writings on British Cinema (London: Cassell, 1996) , pp. 38–50, at p. 41. 19 P. Gillett, The British Working Class in Postwar Film (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2003) , p. 19; R. Murphy, Realism and Tinsel: Cinema and Society in Britain 1939–1949 (London: Routledge, 1992), p. 25; R. Mengham

in Picturing home

Screening the Hollywood Rebels in 1950s Britain explores the relationship between classic American films about juvenile delinquency and British popular youth culture in the mid-twentieth century. The book examines the censorship, publicity and fandom surrounding such Hollywood films as The Wild One, Blackboard Jungle, Rebel Without a Cause, Rock Around the Clock and Jailhouse Rock alongside such British films as The Blue Lamp, Spare the Rod and Serious Charge. Intersecting with star studies and social and cultural history, this is the first book to re-vision the stardom surrounding three extraordinarily influential Hollywood stars: Marlon Brando, James Dean and Elvis Presley. By looking specifically at the meanings of these American stars to British fans, this analysis provides a logical and sustained narrative that explains how and why these Hollywood images fed into, and disrupted, British cultural life. Screening the Hollywood Rebels in 1950s Britain is based upon a wide range of sources including censorship records, both mainstream and trade newspapers and periodicals, archival accounts and memoirs, as well as the films themselves. The book is a timely intervention of film culture and focuses on key questions about screen violence and censorship, masculinity and transnational stardom, method acting and performance, Americanisation and popular post-war British culture. The book is essential reading for researchers, academics and students of film and social and cultural history, alongside general readers interested in the links between the media and popular youth culture in the 1950s.

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Brian McFarlane

1944, in Film Criticism and Caricatures: 1943–53, London: Paul Elek, 1975, p. 46. 42 Robert Murphy, Realism and Tinsel: Cinema and Society in Britain 1939–48, London: Routledge, 1989, p. 50. 43 Lockwood, pp. 108–9. 4 4 Robert Murphy, ‘Gainsborough after Balcon’, in Cook (ed.), Gainsborough Pictures, p. 143. 45 Arliss in Picturegoer, 10 November 1945, p. 7. 46 Lockwood, p. 108. 47 Barbara Klinger, Melodrama and Meaning, Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 199, p. 70. 48 Lockwood, p. 109. 49 Raymond Durgnat, Films and Feelings, London

in Four from the forties
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Brian McFarlane

Rachael Low, Film Making in 1930s Britain, London: George Allen & Unwin, 1985, p. 142. 4 Peter Graham Scott, British Television: An Insider’s History, Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co., 2000, p. 12. 5 Petrie, British Cinematographer, p. 113. 6 Robert Murphy, Realism and Tinsel: Cinema and Society in Britain 1939–48, London: Routledge, 1989, p. 171. 7 Picturegoer, 11 November 1944, p. 5. 8 Lionel Collier, ‘Shop for your films’, Picturegoer, 26 May 1947, p. 12. 9 James Mason, Before I Forget, London: Hamish Hamilton, 1981, p. 143. 10 Monthly Film Bulletin, April 1945

in Four from the forties
Comedies of class, culture and community
Nigel Mather

weaving which enables the factory to reopen at the close of the film, making the intervening period of unemployment depicted in the film seem as if it were merely an extended holiday for the workers in which they were able to enjoy a state of freedom and mobility normally denied to them. Marcia Landy in British Genres: Cinema and Society 1930–1960 (1991), however, warned against too easily assuming that 1930s audiences would

in Tears of laughter