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Abstract only
Bill Dunn

Marx insists that money’s functions can also come into conflict, notably for example its functions as a measure of value and as a medium of circulation (Marx 1970 : 121). These potential conflicts between money’s functions are well established in the Marxist literature. They becomes particularly stark once non-commodity tokens come to stand in for commodity money. These function effectively as media of circulation but are fragile as measures and stores of value (Campbell 2005 : 154). In Marx’s time, paper could be acceptable in domestic markets but not in the

in Keynes and Marx
Bill Dunn

each case, the forms of accumulation were transformed by the monetary transformations. Conclusions The previous two chapters covered enormous ground and were accordingly unable to do justice to the depth of either Marx’s or Keynes’s thinking about money and only occasionally engaged with the vast secondary literatures. This chapter’s historical narrative similarly made no claim to completeness. However, it began to concretise what the previous chapters suggested: that the critical appropriation of Keynesian insights enrich a Marxist monetary analysis. First

in Keynes and Marx
Aris Komporozos-Athanasiou
and
Max Haiven

). 52 See Nishida, ‘Neoliberal Academia and a Critique from Disability Studies’; Mike Condra , Mira Dineen, Helen Gills, Anita Jack-Davies, and Eleanor Condra, ‘ Academic Accommodations for Postsecondary Students with Mental Health Disabilities in Ontario, Canada: A Review of the Literature and Reflections on Emerging Issues

in Clickbait capitalism
Abstract only
Ariane Agunsoye
,
Michelle Groenewald
,
Danielle Guizzo
, and
Kamal Ramburuth-Hurt

. When covering unemployment, you may want to teach the mainstream understanding of this topic and then contrast it with the Marxist concept of the reserve army of labour. When approaching economic growth theory, you can introduce students to the mainstream literature on this and then juxtapose it with Feminist Growth Theory. Finally, you might teach Real Business Cycle Theory and then

in Reclaiming economics for future generations
Clive L. Spash

or failed, but this does not in itself achieve integration of contemporary knowledge. The other four avenues seem to offer more potential for aiding integration, and I will therefore discuss in turn dialectics, metaphor and analogy, unity of science and interdisciplinarity compared to multidisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity. In doing so I will explore each broadly and in light of more recent developments and literature

in Foundations of social ecological economics
Russell Southwood

and Ethiopia. 82 In 2018 it ranked South Africa twentieth in worldwide use of the site. 83 The same year, Rwanda was ranked twenty-ninth out of all African countries accessing the site, with women making up a claimed 27% of its users. In 2019 it identified 37% of those using its site in South Africa as women – a higher-than-average level of use by women across Southern Africa. The authors of the only article on the subject noted that ‘nearly all literature … refers to

in Africa 2.0
Abstract only
Making sense of what has happened over thirty-five years
Russell Southwood

, Nyamnjoh's playful novella, Married but Available , also centres on gender relations around the mobile phone. 48 These different contributions to the literature suggest how closely mobile calling and internet use is entwined with family life and relationships. However, other accounts suggest that behaviours around attitudes to women's use of mobiles and the internet reflect historic tropes, including the potential for threatening male behaviour. As Burrell made clear in her study of Ghanaian cyber

in Africa 2.0
Open Access (free)
Issues, debates and an overview of the crisis
Shalendra D. Sharma

architecture, and what implications does it hold for emerging economies in Asia and elsewhere? The aim of the study is to provide answers to these complex and interrelated questions. Already a large and ever-growing body of literature (academic, policy-oriented and journalistic) has emerged addressing some of these issues – with the question dealing with why the crisis occurred receiving most of the attention. However, much of this literature remains either too general or too country-specific, with the country-specific usually being highly technical and specialized. This study

in The Asian financial crisis
Open Access (free)
The evolving international financial architecture
Shalendra D. Sharma

argued that only polar extremes – floating or fixed exchange rates supported by very strong commitment mechanisms (“hard pegs”) can be sustained for extended periods. Indeed, in the context of increased integration with international capital markets, it seems that there are two credible choices left: a country can either let its exchange 327 The Asian financial crisis rate float freely or adopt a truly fixed arrangement such as hard pegs. In fact, this vanishing middle ground for exchange-rate regimes has been identified in the literature as the “hollowing of the middle” in

in The Asian financial crisis
Joe Earle
,
Cahal Moran
, and
Zach Ward-Perkins

placed to provide students with a liberal education. This is apparent in our curriculum review. At Cambridge there is less of a reliance on textbooks and more engagement with economic literature; multiple-choice tests are not used; and they provide small-group supervision with academics instead of large tutorials with graduate students.9 Other universities cannot provide the same resources per student and so struggle to develop the personalised relationship between student and academic that is such an important part of liberal education. However, our curriculum review

in The econocracy