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"Arbitration, mediation, and third- party intervention"

of medieval law – whether domestic, canon, or Roman – was procedural. 73 From the evidence presented then it is apparent that if we are looking for law against which the facts of a case could be applied in making any decision, there are several options, or combinations of options. And, as arbitration always took place in circumstances in which men, lay and clerical, acted as advisers, we can be

in International law in Europe, 700–1200
Tobias B. Hug

, containing the description of Christ he sent to the Roman Senate, see Joseph Ziegler, ‘Text and context: on the rise of physiognomic thought in the later Middle Ages’, in Yitzak Hen (ed.), De Sion exhibit et verbum domini de Hierusalem: Essays on Medieval Law: Liturgy and Literature in Honour of Amnon Linder (Turnhout, 2001), pp. 159–82. A woodcut illustration to ‘Lentulus’ Letter’ can be found in Joseph L. Koerner, The Moment of Self-Portraiture in German Renaissance Art (Chicago, 1993), p. 117. 83 5287P IMPOSTURES MUP-PT/lb.qxd 14/10/09 15:12 Page 84 Impostures in

in Impostures in early modern England
Lindy Brady

., Welsh Medieval Law (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1909; repr. Aalen: Scientia Verlag, 1979), 116. 30 Owen, ‘Gwentian Code’, 2.40.23. 31 Dieter Bitterli, Say What I Am Called: The Old English Riddles of the Exeter Book and the Anglo-Latin Riddle Tradition, Toronto Anglo-Saxon Series 2 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2009), 31. 32 See the entry for wealh, in Joseph Bosworth and T. Northcote Toller, An AngloSaxon Dictionary (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1898) and T. Northcote Toller, An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Supplement (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1921), Ia, II. For

in Writing the Welsh borderlands in Anglo-Saxon England
Gervase Rosser

boroughs’, in W. J. Turner (ed.), Madness in Medieval Law and Custom , Leiden, 2010, pp. 17–39. 25 Lady Godiva. 26 When he was mayor, in 1494. 27 The restriction on

in Towns in medieval England
Anthony Musson
and
Edward Powell

–6; A. Musson, ‘Appealing to the past: perceptions of law in late medieval England’, in Expectations , ed. Musson, p. 174. 9 Crook, ‘Later eyres’, pp. 241–43; Musson, Medieval Law , pp. 137–45. 10 A. Harding, ‘Early trailbaston proceedings

in Crime, Law and Society in the Later Middle Ages
Anthony Musson
and
Edward Powell

. 23 Musson, Medieval Law , pp. 244–6. 24 Ormrod, Political Life , p. 63; R. W. Kaeuper, Chivalry and Violence in Medieval Europe (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1999), pp. 113–18; W. M. Ormrod, ‘Law in the landscape: criminality, outlawry and regional identity

in Crime, Law and Society in the Later Middle Ages
Anthony Musson
and
Edward Powell

). 6 See Chapter 4 (at 4.2 , 4.6 ). 7 Musson, Medieval Law , pp. 150–51. 8 J. A. Yunck, The Lineage of Lady Meed: The Development of Medieval Venality Satire (Notre Dame, IN, University of Notre Dame Press, 1963

in Crime, Law and Society in the Later Middle Ages
Socio-cultural considerations of intellectual disability
Irina Metzler

Literature of the Middle Ages , ed. J. O. Halliwell et al. (London: Percy Society, 1840), vol. II, 165. 103 Schmitt, Logik der Gesten , 246–7. 104 Paul Freedman, Images of the Medieval Peasant (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1999), 150. I have discussed this in Metzler, ‘Afterword’, in Wendy J. Turner (ed.), Madness in Medieval Law and Custom (Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2010), 197–217, at 207. 105 T. F. Hoad, The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology (Oxford: Clarendon

in Fools and idiots?
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Labour, capital and corporate power
Laura Clancy

’. 49 The Crown is legally a common law corporation. Medieval law used Roman ideas of the body politic as ‘ universitas , a corporation of the polity’, to distinguish between the Crown and the monarch's natural body, meaning that laws made regarding, and assets belonging to, the monarch(y) will pass to the succeeding monarch. 50 Historically, the Crown used private corporations to manage public services, such as municipalities, universities or the Corporation of London, and to manage

in Running the Family Firm
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Phillipp R. Schofield

Ian Blanchard on the occasion of his 70th Birthday (Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2012), pp. 77–88; also P.R. Schofield, ‘Peasant debt in English manorial courts: form and nature’, in Julie-Mayade Claustr, ed., Endettement privé et justice au Moyen Age (Paris: Publications de la Sorbonne, 2007), pp. 55–67. 35 A. Musson, Medieval law in context. The growth of legal consciousness from Magna Carta to the Peasants’ Revolt (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001), pp. 84–134. 36 See above, Chapter 7, pp

in Peasants and historians