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Neil Macmaster

8 The battle over the personal status law of 19591 Of the different measures taken by the French government for the advancement and emancipation of Algerian women none was potentially more important than the 1959 reform of marriage and family law (statut personnel). It is no co-incidence that throughout the Muslim world during the last hundred years political battles over reform and modernisation have inevitably been framed in relation to the legal position and rights of women. The structure of the family cell constituted the fundamental bedrock of the total

in Burning the veil
Abstract only
Derek Robbins

5 The 1950s Early career In this chapter I explore the beginnings of Bourdieu’s career. It was, perhaps, his enforced period of military service in Algeria which extinguished any aspiration to become a philosopher which may have lingered after his time at the École Normale Supérieure. What he saw in Algeria and how he saw it crystallized the awareness of the tension between familial and scholarly experience which he had already sensed in his youth. His time in Algeria enabled him to recognize the abyss between the way in which indigenous culture operated

in The Bourdieu paradigm
Madness and colonization
Azzedine Haddour

’s assimilationist policies, policies which impacted negatively on Algerian society, on its economy and its mental health. As we shall see in Chapter 5, not only did they lead to the expropriation, marginalization and acculturation of the Algerian people, they also precipitated the breakdown of their social structures and culminated in the emergence of a lumpenproletariat. Arguably, madness and what Fanon dubs the ‘North African syndrome’ were nothing but manifestations of colonial assimilation and the attendant violence to which it gave rise as it brought about the pulverization

in Frantz Fanon, postcolonialism and the ethics of difference
Guy Austin

Case studies: L’Arche du désert (Mohamed Chouikh, 1997), Rachida (Yamina Bachir Chouikh, 2002), Barakat! (Djamila Sahraoui, 2006) In Algeria the 1990s are known as ‘the black decade’, a period of widespread terror and trauma. Ostensibly this was a civil war, fought between the forces of the state and

in Algerian national cinema
Making contact with peasant society
Neil Macmaster

7 The mobile socio-medical teams (EMSI): making contact with peasant society The army faced a particularly daunting task in its ambition to create a strategy of contact, which would enable it to penetrate into the lives of the great mass of Algerian women that inhabited the interior. Here, as chapter 6 has shown, conditions were particularly adverse to such a project due to a combination of poverty, illiteracy and isolation, combined with forms of military action that alienated rural communities. The key instrument of contact that was developed during Operation

in Burning the veil
Sous les pieds des femmes and Vivre au paradis
Carrie Tarr

Rachida Krim (1997) and Vivre au paradis by Bourlem Gherdjou (1998), two first feature films set in part during the time of the Franco-Algerian war; Le Gone du Chaâba (1998), a feature film by white director Christophe Ruggia, but faithfully adaptated from Azouz Begag’s 1986 autobiographical coming-of-age novel, set in a bidonville (shanty-town) outside Lyons in the mid-1960s; and Yamina Benguigui’s highly acclaimed documentary triptych, Mémoires

in Reframing difference
Neil Macmaster

, loud-speaker lorries, mobile cinemas and other means of communication. This, and two further chapters, examine in more detail three key dimensions of the accelerating attempts at bridge-building, a ‘strategy of contact’: firstly, this chapter looks at the role of mass media communication (print, film and radio) which was developed centrally by the government and military to reach women across the entire geographical space of Algeria. This is followed by chapter 5 on the role of the MSF, local associations that operated mainly in the big cities and the smaller

in Burning the veil
Guy Austin

Algerian films where the father is absent, such as Bab El-Oued City (Allouache, 1994), where the brother plays the role of patriarch, or Le Vent des Aurès (Lakhdar-Hamina, 1966), Rachida (Bachir Chouikh, 2002), Viva Laldjérie (Mokneche, 2004) and Délice Paloma (Mokneche, 2007), where women’s mobility is predicated on the death or absence of the father, Algerian cinema tends to reflect the fact that ‘The patriarchal

in Algerian national cinema
Neil Macmaster

and intelligence logic of measures that it wished to dress in the clothing of liberal and democratic reform. However, an examination of this early stage is of interest, since the timing, and how and why the various initiatives were first undertaken, is informative as to the underlying concerns and objectives of the colonial authorities in moving towards such a strategy. This chapter, which covers the first half of the Algerian War from 1 November 1954 until the coup of ‘13 May’ 1958, falls into two parts. During a first phase from 1954 until mid-1956, which was

in Burning the veil
Neil Macmaster

9 The FLN and the role of women during the war The universally held image of women during the Algerian War is that, made famous by Frantz Fanon and Pontecorvo’s classic film The Battle of Algiers, of Muslim women as heroic resistance fighters. However, this enduring symbol of ‘Third World’ women confronting the might of colonial armies reflects more the propaganda success of the FLN in manipulating the representation of Algerian women than any real or enduring transformation of their position or rights. For the majority of FLN leaders the ‘woman question’ did

in Burning the veil