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Jennifer Mori

fossils and rock samples to illustrate a new series of lectures on geology and palaeontology, and the professor was pleased to report in 1782 that the study of petrology was gaining ground in Cambridge. In our time, you know, it was a study scarce heard of among us; we were looked upon as no better than cockle-shell pickers; butterfly-hunters and weed gatherers; and I remember very well when I walked forth now & then, with a little hammer concealed under my coat, I looked carefully around me, lest I should be detected in the ridiculous act of knocking a poor stone to

in The culture of diplomacy
Lichtenberg’s excretory vision of Hogarth’s A Harlot’s Progress
Anthony Mahler

augur (haruspex) did not see it, or the woman [the future in] the grounds of the coffee cup.’81 Lichtenberg does not dispute the idea that the future could be read out of entrails or coffee grounds: ‘no one will deny that, in a world in which everything is related by cause and effect, and where nothing occurs by miracles, every part is a mirror of the whole. … No one doubts this absolute readability of everything in everything.’82 With a Leibnizbased belief in a kind of butterfly-effect, Lichtenberg postulates that the form of the entrails is quite possibly

in Bellies, bowels and entrails in the eighteenth century
Abstract only
Museums in Sydney and Melbourne
John M. MacKenzie

thousand occupations; a botanist, a geologist, a hunter of beetles and butterflies, a musical amateur, a sketcher of no mean pretensions; in short, a complete virtuoso’. 54 He published books on natural history and geology discovered on his travels and seized the opportunities to pursue these interests on the south coast of Australia. Meanwhile, the Mechanics’ Institute, perhaps catering for middle

in Museums and empire
New roles for women
Diana Donald

sexist lines. ‘MK’ in a letter to the Standard, chose to attribute the spurious enterprise to a charlatan of the Charles Wheeler type –​‘the very prince of humbugs … he knows the world and I should not be surprised to find his ridiculous appeal answered by a great many old maids who love dogs and whose sympathies can easily be moved by reference to the miseries of the canine race to sending him subscriptions to a large amount’. Why not a ‘Butterfly and Caterpillar Protection Society’?43 A  charge of female gullibility, a reductio ad absurdum and a revival of the

in Women against cruelty (revised edition)
Orientalism, miscegenation fears and female fantasy
Lucy Bland

weeping and occasional swooning, with the press repeatedly referring to her as ‘pale and drooping’, her ‘two frightened eyes, barely visible beneath the deep brim of the small cloche hat’.75 She wept so ‘copiously’, according to Reynolds’s News, that ‘several women in the public gallery were crying too’.76 The butterfly analogy which we saw used so widely in the reportage of young women and drugs was made here too, the Empire News commenting that when she spoke ‘it was like the fluttering of the gossamer wings of a butterfly on the wheel’.77 Marshall Hall mentioned more

in Modern women on trial
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The children of the Vietnam War
Sabine Lee

Butterfly’s tragic tale, set in 1975 Saigon, where an entire song deals with the so-called Bui Doi (dust of life).2 Even away from Broadway and the West End their stories were shared. ‘Heartbreaking’, a ‘riveting family drama’ – were the reviewers’ comments on The Daughter from Danang,3 a documentary that recounts the story of Heidi Bob, to all appearances an ‘all-American girl’ in the small town Pulaski, Tennessee. Yet, Heidi is anything but ‘all-American’. Born in 1968 as Mai Thi Hiep in Da Nang, one of the major port cities on the South Central Coast of Vietnam, and

in Children born of war in the twentieth century
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FANY service after the Armistice 1918–19
Janet Lee

some women (like the ‘butterfly chauffeuses’ perhaps) must have been disappointed with their FANY lives and returned to England, their stories do not subvert the collective history of the organization. This collective history of solidarity was especially important since it was believed that one of the greatest obstacles for women working in military auxiliaries doing tradi- 211 212 War girls tionally male work was the inability of women to get along together. A Vogue article featuring ‘these sturdy girls’ of the FANY not only told stories of their heroism and how

in War girls
The formation of a female nursing yeomanry
Juliette Pattinson

nurses within the ANS and its reserve, which counted fewer than 200 to draw upon, many civilian nurses enlisted for service in the South African War, swelling the number to nearly 900. 79 One of them was Isabel Wicks, who a decade later, in October 1909 at the age of thirty-four, joined the FANY. In addition to professional nurses, untrained but altruistic upper-class women, dismissively referred to as ‘butterflies’ in that they were decorative, fragile and fluttering, also travelled to the veldt and set themselves up as ‘nurses’. 80 One of the very earliest FANY

in Women of war
New roles for women
Diana Donald

sexist lines. ‘MK’ in a letter to the Standard, chose to attribute the spurious enterprise to a charlatan of the Charles Wheeler type –​‘the very prince of humbugs … he knows the world and I should not be surprised to find his ridiculous appeal answered by a great many old maids who love dogs and whose sympathies can easily be moved by reference to the miseries of the canine race to sending him subscriptions to a large amount’. Why not a ‘Butterfly and Caterpillar Protection Society’?43 A charge of female gullibility, a reductio ad absurdum and a revival of the ancient

in Women against cruelty
R. N. Swanson

. CHAPTER 25 Many men are covetous for worldly honour and earthly riches, and think night and day, sleeping and waking, how and by what means they might achieve them, and forget to consider themselves, and the pains of Hell and the joys of Heaven. Surely they are not wise, they are like the children who run after a butterfly, and because they do not watch their feet

in Catholic England