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Abstract only
David Geiringer

sense of agency in constructing their religious belief systems, even when these systems seemed to challenge their bodily instincts. The ‘existential contract’ he proposes reminds us of Margaret’s reflections on the condition of post-Vatican II Catholicism that this book opened with. 2 Margaret staunchly defended her form of ‘pick and mix’ Catholicism from accusations of hypocrisy, celebrating it as the

in The Pope and the pill
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Cara Delay

in vain to repeat the Lord’s Prayer as I felt it would help me, but I kept getting it all mixed up.1 Hyland’s concern that she would ‘lose’ her religion once she entered the Anglican Church testifies that some memoirists feared that they were ‘getting it all mixed up’ and not living up to the ideal of Catholic girlhood. Hyland worried that she would be changed, even contaminated, by her entry into the space of the Church of Ireland. From an early age, Hyland’s religion was integral to her identity – Catholicism was a central force in the lives of early twentieth

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
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Oliver P. Rafferty

in circumstances where the hegemony of Catholicism was challenged as indeed it was in the sixteenth century. But, on the other hand, it could be argued that challenges to identity formation were in many ways the norm in Ireland with successive waves of invaders becoming stakeholders in the culture culminating in the twelfth-century Norman invasion. Clearly Irish history, and therefore the sense of identity of the Irish, is complicated by the fact of the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation so that there is no easy equation between Irishness on the one hand and

in Irish Catholic identities
Bryan Fanning

5 A Catholic vision of Ireland In his 1911 novel The Dawn of All, Robert Hugh Benson, an English priest who converted to Catholicism (his father had been the Archbishop of Canterbury), imagined a future where most of the world had done the same. The Dawn of All recounts the story of a former priest living in a future atheistic 1973, who regains consciousness in a London hospital, in an England where the Reformation and secularism have been reversed. In this vision, religion had no influence in society and priests had no relevance. In the remainder of the book

in Irish adventures in nation-building
Louise Fuller

18 Identity and political fragmentation in independent Ireland, 1923–83 Louise Fuller The centrality of Catholicism to Irish identity in the post-independence era has to be understood against the background of nineteenth and early twentieth century Irish history. The mobilisation of bishops, priests and Catholic laity by Daniel O’Connell from the early nineteenth century led to Catholic emancipation and from that time the Catholic community was increasingly politicised. A chief priority for the bishops throughout the nineteenth century was the securing of

in Irish Catholic identities
José Álvarez-Junco

defence of the Baroque literary style was closely bound up with his own visceral anti-liberalism. Moreover, his wife, Francisca Ruiz de Larrea, published a pamphlet in the same year in which she claimed that the ‘ancient character of the nation’ and the ‘race of the Pelayos’ were both indissolubly linked to Catholicism and the absolute monarchy.1 Together with their Romanticism and conservatism, the Böhls manifested an appreciation of the Spanish identity as one of the most Romantic in Europe. Böhl de Faber, like Schlegel, was a follower of Johann Gottfried Herder, for

in Spanish identity in the age of nations
Brian Mac Cuarta SJ

5 • Scots Catholics in Ulster, 1603–41 brian mac cuarta sj Scottish migration to Ulster in the early seventeenth century has generally been considered in terms of the arrival of settlers marked in varying degrees by that strand of Protestantism prevalent in their native land.1 The smaller Scots Catholic influx by contrast has been little noted, yet it was of significance both for the Catholic community in Scotland, and for Catholicism in Ulster. Although the Catholic dimension to Scottish immigration is not easily or comprehensively traceable, several strands

in The Scots in early Stuart Ireland
Ireland’s contribution to Scottish Catholic renewal in the seventeenth century
R. Scott Spurlock

6 • Confessionalization and clan cohesion: Ireland’s contribution to Scottish Catholic renewal in the seventeenth century* r. scott spurlock Post-Tridentine Roman Catholicism has traditionally been understood to have made a minimal impact on the Gaelic-speaking west of Scotland during the seventeenth century. Having been chronically understaffed, the Catholic Church in the Western Isles was in a dire state by the reformation. Subsequently, it entered into a period between 1560 and 1620 labelled by Allan MacInnes and John L. Campbell as ‘moribund’.1 While

in The Scots in early Stuart Ireland
Louise Fuller

, who had been secretary to Pope Paul VI, Pope John Paul I and John Paul II, resigned as a result. In 1979, all had seemed well in Irish Catholicism, and the enthusiasm surrounding the Pope’s visit would have conveyed that to any outside observer. A  comprehensive survey of values and attitudes in the mid-​ 1970s recorded that 91 per cent of Irish Catholics attended mass weekly (Catholic Communications Institute of Ireland 1975:  71). But cracks were beginning to appear as early as the 1950s and certainly in the 1960s. However, the period addressed here, 1979 to 2011

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism
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Cara Delay

, consumerism, and the larger economy. More families lived in urban areas, where there were also increased opportunities for purchasing ready-made goods. Early twentieth-century Irish households in towns and cities thus were places where women not only managed devotional space but also made significant financial decisions. While scholars long have explored the connections between consumerism and secularisation, it is clear that popular Catholicism and modern consumerism were linked in Ireland and beyond. Vincent Miller writes that the consumption of religion is tied to the

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950