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Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

In Chapter 1 we saw that the UK approach to anti-terrorism is relatively distinct from potential comparator states. This suggests that the consequences – intended and otherwise – of its framework may well be pronounced and distinctive too. Policy and legal apparatuses in the area of security and beyond impact on populations, communities and individuals in particular and

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Matt McDonald

dynamics of militarization, particularly in Northeast Asia. Both of these implications clearly undermine individual wellbeing in the region by exposing individuals to limits on political and civil freedoms and/or through increasing the possibility for large-scale violence. Further, both are inimical to the US’ self-professed goals of combating terrorism and contributing to regional stability

in Critical Security in the Asia-Pacific
Cohesion, contestation and constructivism
Andrew Whiting

the conceptualisations of war offered by Clausewitz when arriving at their definition ( Liff, 2012 , p. 408). However, even these widely accepted tenets of warfare are not safe within the definitional debate and a new definition of war may be required due to the ‘unpredictable nature of damage that cyber-attack can inflict’ ( Farwell and Rohozinski, 2012 , p. 113). Terrorism provides another rich vein of definitional work, albeit one in which ‘the lack of a consistent definition of terrorism’ presents a ‘significant barrier’ ( Embar-Seddon, 2002 , p. 1034

in Constructing cybersecurity
Abstract only
Tim Aistrope

important cultural driver of terrorism. Conspiracy theories about American power were said to be fuelling Arab-Muslim anger towards America; that this anger had motivated Al-Qaeda’s attacks; and that it continued to provide Al-Qaeda with moral support and a ready stream of recruits. Here is Thomas Friedman in the New York Times : I’m glad that

in Conspiracy theory and American foreign policy
Abstract only
Tim Aistrope

THIS BOOK HAS TRACED the Arab-Muslim paranoia narrative from its intellectual origins in Cold War liberalism, through post-9/11 foreign policy commentary on terrorism, to the heart of the Bush administration’s War of Ideas doctrine. I have shown that this narrative delegitimised criticism of American power, buttressed existing foreign policy

in Conspiracy theory and American foreign policy
Striking the balance
Tricia Bacon

crises are not primarily about terrorism for the U.S. They raise serious concerns about escalation and miscalculation that could lead to a nuclear confrontation between India and Pakistan. 6 These crises have produced both subsequent progress in the U.S.–India counterterrorism relationship – often leading to new initiatives and efforts to collaborate – as well as tensions, as the U.S. rarely satisfies India in its subsequent approach to Pakistan. In other words, crises caused by terrorist attacks create opportunities for

in The future of U.S.–India security cooperation
Abstract only
Edwin Bacon, Bettina Renz, and Julian Cooper

measures apparently designed to combat terrorism. These included the decision to halt elections for Russia’s regional heads in favour of a system of presidential appointment, and the declaration that from 2007 onwards elections to the lower house of the Russian parliament, the State Duma, would be conducted purely on a proportional representation basis, with the existing constituency element removed. The events of that one particular week in September 2004 in Russia serve to encapsulate the theme of this book. No one could deny the extent of the terrorist threat faced by

in Securitising Russia
Andrew Whiting

machines, the result can be devastating’ ( McAfee, 2012 ). The threat posed by cyber-crime is characterised as being more of a risk to the UK than a nuclear strike ( BullGuard, 2013c ) and even some more conservative assessments still rank similar threats very highly, with only terrorism and nuclear proliferation usurping them ( ESET Research, 2010b ). Elsewhere, cyberterrorism is said to be ‘the number one national security threat to the U.S.’, with terrorist organisations increasingly developing ‘digital specialists’ with particular interest in exploiting

in Constructing cybersecurity
The dynamics of multilateralism in Eurasia
Sean Kay

have also used these institutions to signal their intentions and to reinforce their domestic identity. None the less, international institutions in Eurasia have neither mitigated the security dilemma nor facilitated cooperative approaches to the new security challenges of transnational terrorism, ethnic strife, environmental degradation, food and energy scarcity, drug trafficking, unchecked population growth, rampant migration and organised crime.2 Eurasia hosts several variations in institutional forms, including the CIS, GUUAM, and the SCO. Yet these three

in Limiting institutions?
Tim Aistrope

their unsatisfactory circumstances in far-fetched delusions of hidden power. Here conspiracy theory was considered endemic in Arab-Muslim culture such that it informed Arab-Muslim interpretations of America’s regional engagement. However abhorrent terrorism might be, both these narratives disqualified the political grievances motivating resentment towards America. They made

in Conspiracy theory and American foreign policy