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Anne Sweeney

Virgin Queen exactly paralleling the wearing of holy images by Catholics’. 60 Elizabeth’s (or her chief ministers’) estimation of the importance of such iconography can be measured by the lengths gone to in the control and dissemination of it. Spenser’s poetic project was part of this process: consider the Marianism implicit in Mercilla’s divine melding of majesty with

in Robert Southwell
Abstract only
Shakespeare’s brute part
Richard Wilson

enough ‘emotional literacy’ to universalize their wandering minds and hands. 102 So it is that in Shakespearean Windsor the master language meets its accidental match in the mother tongue spoken not by the Virgin Queen of the Castle, but by Dame Quickly, another kind of ‘quean, an old cozening quean!’ [ 4,2,149 ], who can have ‘nothing to do with marriage’. 103 ‘I pray you remember in your prain’: with

in Free Will
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Richard Wilson

Press, 1992), p. 244. 16 Ortega y Gasset, Ortega y Gasset: Velázquez, Goya, and the Dehumanization of Art , trans. A. Beeching (New York: Littlehampton, 1972), p. 88. 17 Arifa Akbar, ‘The Virgin Queen, the Serpent and the Doctored Portrait: Artist

in Free Will
Puritans and Dissenters
Robert G. Ingram

Elizabeth’s reign but rather by quoting repeatedly from the managers of Henry Sacheverell’s trial regarding Elizabeth’s persecution of the Puritans.84 The path from the persecutory Virgin Queen through Sacheverell to Edmund Gibson and his fellow orthodox churchmen was one that Neal left his readers to trace for themselves.85 Gibson became an increasingly polarizing figure during the 1730s, as he 212 Factions, seditions and schismatical principles strengthened the resolve of the bench of bishops to defend the established Church. The 1734 parliamentary election returned a

in Reformation without end
Lyly’s elusive theatre (1583–c.1590)
Andy Kesson

does not (V.i.103–4). In both plays, the dreams are composed of threatening images that articulate fears about sexuality and power, and so are especially provocative in court performance in front of a queen who had recently abandoned prolonged marriage negotiations and begun to promote herself as the Virgin Queen. These dreams are further tied to the real queen in the audience

in John Lyly and Early Modern Authorship
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Our Lyly?
Andy Kesson

contained by its courtly context and that he is a writer who writes only to flatter and pay tribute. The brilliance of Hunter’s book on the subject of the Renaissance means that this view of Lyly extends well beyond the rather diminutive field of Lylian criticism, so that in her study of Elizabethan literature and the Virgin Queen Philippa Berry reminds scholars that ‘G. K. Hunter suggested that Lyly was a

in John Lyly and Early Modern Authorship
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Annaliese Connolly and Lisa Hopkins

featured the Earl of Essex, including the two-part drama series Elizabeth I screened on Channel Four in 2005. This starred Helen Mirren as Elizabeth and concentrated on her relationships with the Earl of Leicester, played by Jeremy Irons, in episode one and with Hugh Dancy as the Earl of Essex in episode two. 24 The second drama series, for the BBC and called The Virgin Queen , starred Anne Marie Duff as the queen

in Essex
Heylyn and the Restoration church, 1660–1688
Anthony Milton

foundations of the state in the time of King Edward; nor in the fire in which so many godly and religious persons were consumed to ashes in the days of Queen Mary; but that he shewed himself in that ‘still small voice’ which breathed so much comfort to the souls of his people, in the most gracious and fortunate government of a virgin Queen.46 This represented a radical rethinking of the nature of England’s Reformation. Before Heylyn, accounts of the Reformation had emphasized the heroics of the early days of reformation – the attack on monkish superstition, the rejection of

in Laudian and royalist polemic in seventeenth-century England
Tim Thornton and Katharine Carlton

relationships, S. T. Bindoff, The House of Commons, 1509–1558 (3 vols. London: Secker & Warburg for the History of Parliament Trust, 1982), iii. 421; Jack Brierley Watson, ‘Lancashire Gentry 1529–58’ (unpubl. M.A. diss., London Univ., 1959), pp. 492–4. 66 BIA, CP.G 1586, CP.G 1515, CP.G 1663; CP.G 1588; HC.AB 6, fos. 88, 134–5, 158–9, 160; LRO, DDF/989. 67 Paul E. J. Hammer, ‘Sex and the Virgin Queen: Aristocratic Concupiscence and the Court of Elizabeth I’, Sixteenth Century Journal, 31 (2000), 77–97. 68 LP xviii/1. 65–6 (caps. xl, xliii, xliv); see below, pp. 89–90, 102

in The gentleman’s mistress
Tim Thornton and Katharine Carlton

. 211; G. C. Williamson, George, Third Earl of Cumberland (1558–1605): His Life andVoyages (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1920), p. 264; Anne Clifford’s Great Books of Record, ed. J. L. Malay (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015), p. 710. See above, p. 55n.29, for speculation as to the identity of this mistress. 2 The Letters of Lady Anne Bacon, ed. G. Allen, Camden Society, 5th ser., 44 (Cambridge, 2014), p. 263; P. J. Hammer, ‘Sex and the Virgin Queen: Aristocratic Concupiscence and the Court of Elizabeth I’, Sixteenth Century Journal, 31 (2000

in The gentleman’s mistress