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Daniel Dezeuze and China from scroll to (TV) screen
Sarah Wilson

Mao, militancy and media: Daniel Dezeuze and China from scroll to (TV) screen Sarah Wilson Experimental practice Linguistics, semiotics Chinese thought and writing With Marxism-Leninism Psychoanalysis The thought of Mao Zedong Peinture: Cahiers Théoriques, editorial, May 19711 In 2015 I proposed the French artist Daniel Dezeuze for the first Asian Biennale/fifth Guangzhou Triennale at the Guangdong Museum of Art. ‘Asia Time’, had prevailed over ‘Search: Asia’ as the exhibition concept, inspired by my fellow curator Zhang Qing’s readings around the clash of

in Art, Global Maoism and the Chinese Cultural Revolution
Institutions and the challenges of refugee governance
Dalia Abdelhady

7 Dalia Abdelhady Media constructions of the refugee crisis in Sweden: institutions and the challenges of refugee governance In an article entitled ‘The Death of the Most Generous Nation on Earth’, American journalist James Traub (2016) claims that ‘The vast migration of desperate souls from Syria, Iraq, and elsewhere has posed a moral test the likes of which Europe has not faced since the Nazis forced millions from their homes in search of refuge. Europe has failed that test.’ Sweden stands out as an exception in Traub’s analysis due to the country’s generous

in Refugees and the violence of welfare bureaucracies in Northern Europe
Michael Breen, Michael Courtney, Iain Mcmenamin, Eoin O’Malley, and Kevin Rafter

3 The media and political change This chapter assesses three broad perspectives on how the Irish media has covered political change in Ireland over almost fifty years. The first, which we call ‘hypercritical infotainment’, emphasises the media as a collective agent of change. According to this approach, the media shifts from passive reporting of politics to framing it as a political competition and adopting a negative tone towards politics. This, in turn, imposes a media logic on politicians, who become more interested in spin and soundbites than policymaking

in Resilient reporting
Adam O’Brien

An important theme in current studies of environmental representation is the inadequacy of many narratological and stylistic techniques for registering ecological complexity. This article argues that, in the case of cinema, water constitutes an especially vivid example of an allusive natural subject, and it examines the means by which one film, The Bay (Barry Levinson, 2012), manages to confront that challenge. It pays particular attention to The Bay’s treatment of animal life, and its acknowledgement of water’s infrastructural currency. The article draws on the writings of ecocritical literary theorist Timothy Morton and media historian and theorist John Durham Peters.

Film Studies
Mattias Frey and Sara Janssen

This introduction to the Film Studies special issue on Sex and the Cinema considers the special place of sex as an object of inquiry in film studies. Providing an overview of three major topic approaches and methodologies – (1) representation, spectatorship and identity politics; (2) the increasing scrutiny of pornography; and (3) new cinema history/media industries studies – this piece argues that the parameters of and changes to the research of sex, broadly defined, in film studies reflect the development of the field and discipline since the 1970s, including the increased focus on putatively ‘low’ cultural forms, on areas of film culture beyond representation and on methods beyond textual/formal analysis.

Film Studies
Open Access (free)
Valérie Gorin and Sönke Kunkel

humanitarian communication, and you get a different picture: here, history is everywhere. No website of any major humanitarian organization comes along without its own history section. On YouTube, humanitarian players provide an ever growing number of documentaries about their past and origins. Fundraising campaigns, mass mailings, and social media posts all point frequently to historical achievements. Major aid organizations now also call on their branches to ‘enhance the historical and cultural

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Goth Subcultures in Cyberspace
Jason Whittaker

While Goths tend to be neglected in more mainstream media, they are thriving as part of online communities as part of the phenomenon of net.Goths. This paper considers some of the recent manifestations of such subcultural activities online, especially in relation to the practice of demarcating the boundaries of participation through displays of cultural capital (such as music and fashion), and aspects of communication that have emerged on the Internet such as ‘trolling’. The overarching concern of this paper is to explore some of the ways in which defining a subculture virtually may reinforce activities of the group in other environments.

Gothic Studies
Toby Fricker

the rapid influx of people, the Jordanian government opened Za’atari refugee camp in late July 2012, with support from the Jordan Hashemite Charity Organisation, United Nations agencies and other partners. 3 In the harsh conditions of Jordan’s northern desert, Za’atari rapidly became a massive aid operation and at the same time the media face of not only the refugee crisis in Jordan but across the

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Laurens de Rooij

Muslims to ones of white hegemony, nationalism, imperialism, and the place of minorities in Britain as one that should be defined by the pre-existing population and not by the minorities themselves. Edward Said stated in 1987 that there were a number of essential themes associated with Muslims. 2 We can conclude that when it comes to Muslims in the British media today some of those same tropes are still currently used. I will discuss the ones most common in my research here. Even

in Islam in British media discourses
Regina E. Rauxloh

69 4 Regina E. Rauxloh ‘Kony is so last month’ –​lessons from social media stunt ‘Kony 2012’ Introduction The role of the International Criminal Court (ICC) is to bring those responsible for committing the most serious crimes to justice when no domestic court is willing or able to do so. Although as of 2015, the Court has as many as 123 member states, one of its most crippling weaknesses is its lack of enforcement power.1 The ICC is entirely dependent on the co-​operation of national states, whether it is for enabling investigation by permitting entry into a

in Law in popular belief