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New insights at the fin de siècle
Diana Donald

Shambles resembles that of an attractive storybook rather than a tract. Kipling’s Just So Stories had been published in 1902, with stories variously entitled ‘The cat that walked by himself’, ‘The butterfly •  245  • WOMEN AGAINST CRUELTY that stamped’ and so on. In echoing this idiom, and referring to the animals as though they, rather than the humans in attendance, were the subjects of the various episodes  –​empowered agents rather than denatured victims  –​ the authors of Shambles pointed the contrast between the Victorians’ fond anthropomorphic whimsy in animal

in Women against cruelty (revised edition)
New insights at the fin de siècle
Diana Donald

, and even the page format of the later editions of Shambles resembles that of an attractive storybook rather than a tract. Kipling’s Just So Stories had been published in 1902, with stories variously entitled ‘The cat that walked by himself ’, ‘The butterfly that stamped’ and so on. In echoing this idiom, and referring to the animals as though they, rather than the humans in attendance, were the subjects of the various episodes –​empowered agents rather than denatured victims –​the authors of Shambles pointed the contrast between the Victorians’ fond anthropomorphic

in Women against cruelty
Martine Monacelli

the victims of ignorance, I urge earnestly on every man, and yet more on every woman in this room, the duty of offering girls some education which will teach them what vast numbers of middle-class girls are not now taught, that there are higher objects in life than finery and amusement; that they are responsible to themselves, to the State, and to God, for the precious gift of womanhood. And if I urge the higher education of women for the sake of such as these foolish butterflies, how much more for the wise working bees of the human hive; for the two and a half

in Male voices on women's rights
Michael R. Lynn

following his balloon “as children who followed the butterflies in the field.” More typically, people described the peasants as reactionary. In one case, they apparently threw stones at the balloon.51 Nicolas, a chemistry professor in Nancy, ridiculed the peasants mercilessly. He launched an unmanned balloon and trailed after it on the ground. When he asked the peasants if they had seen it they responded that they did not understand what he meant by balloon, but that they had seen a large bird. In writing about the incident he emphasized their lack of understanding and

in Popular science and public opinion in eighteenth-century France
The conversion of Irish Catholics, c.1721–34
Andrew Sneddon

not worth a butterfly’ and ‘one swallow makes no summer’.129 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 Hutchinson, Almanack (2nd edn), p. ii. Ibid., p. iii. Ibid., p. v. Hutchinson, Church catechism in Irish, p. 35. Ibid. Hutchinson, Almanack (2nd edn), p. v. Ibid., p. ii. Ibid., sig. A1V [title page]. Ibid., p. iii. Ibid., pp. 16, 18, 13. Ibid., pp. 16, 14. 168 Ireland Although it ran to two editions identical in content,130 the Almanack failed to persuade other authors to publish texts that used phonetic Irish. In fact no other Protestant work was published

in Witchcraft and Whigs
Heather Walton

mother and to the child that she must separate from to love. This is the divided subject beatified: Recovered childhood, dreamed peace restored, in sparks, flash of cells, instant of laughter, smiles in the blackness of dreams, at night opaque joy that roots me in her bed, my mother’s, and projects him, a son, a butterfly soaking up dew from her hand, there, nearby, in the night. Alone: she, I and he. (Kristeva, 1987b: 247) 112 This extract is an example of Kristeva at her most brilliant and most disturbing. For what space, apart from psychosis, is there for a woman

in Literature, theology and feminism
Susan M. Johns

states that she was the ‘last true Princess of Wales’, who ‘was lost to her people and her nation for 700 years’: she was ‘like a butterfly that never took flight’ and ‘lived and died in a cocoon’. Her tale also features on the ‘Castlewales’ website, complete with an image of the modern tombstone at Cwmhir Abbey and the commemorative stone in Lincolnshire. 22 The latter two quotations were from Malt Anderson, who formed the Gwenllian Society, and shows that the impulse behind this twenty-first-century commemoration is a nationalistic sense of a Welsh medieval past

in Gender, nation and conquest in the high Middle Ages
Abstract only
Berny Sèbe

mentioned six different senses of the word ‘hero’ (including one referring to a butterfly); the first was related to ancient times, and the second was applied to ‘those who distinguish themselves through extraordinary value or memorable successes at war’. It quoted among other examples La Bruyère (1645–1696), who argued that ‘the hero, it seems, belongs to one profession only, that of arms’, and

in Heroic imperialists in Africa
Elizabeth C. Macknight

develop their estates and model farms.36 In Britain and Ireland too elite women invested in creating the interiors and gardens that were settings for a country-house lifestyle.37 When the weather was fine, gardens and parklands of a château were used for leisure pursuits and entertaining; walks and games, fishing, butterfly hunts and pony rides occupied children. As mistress of the home, a noblewoman made decisions either independently or in consultation with her husband and the régisseur. The flowers, herbs, or summer berries she desired to grow in her jardin d

in Nobility and patrimony in modern France
Paul Cavill

–3 passim; N.  Ramsay, ‘“The manuscripts flew about like butterflies”: the break-up of English libraries in the sixteenth century’, in J.  Raven (ed.), Lost Libraries: The Destruction of Great Book Collections since Antiquity (Basingstoke, 2004), pp. 125–44; R. H. Fritze, ‘“Truth hath lacked witnesse, tyme wanted light”: the dispersal of English monastic libraries and Protestant efforts at preservation, ca. 1535–1625’, Journal of Library History, 18 (1983), 274–91; C. de Hamel, ‘The dispersal of the library of Christ Church, Canterbury, from the fourteenth to the

in Writing the history of parliament in Tudor and early Stuart England