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A historiographical perspective
Susan Doran and Paulina Kewes

13, there existed a real possibility that, with or without the pope’s blessing, Spain or France or English Catholic exiles in cahoots with their co-­religionists at home might back an alternative candidate: in 1593, for example, a Catholic plot was hatched in Flanders to assassinate Elizabeth and raise Derby to the throne; and throughout the 1590s English spies warned of conspiracies to seize Arbella and marry her to a foreign Catholic prince. At the same time (as will be seen in Paulina Kewes’s Chapter 3), many godly Protestants in England were suspicious about

in Doubtful and dangerous
Education, migration and Catholicism in early modern Europe
Liam Chambers

heretical universities of Oxford and Cambridge, while awaiting a change of fortune at home.19 Eamon Duffy, by contrast, points to evidence for the intended missionary function of the college from the start, with the English college envisaged more as a Collegium Germanicum for the west.20 In any event, Douai quickly became central to the English Catholic mission, though financing the college was a constant challenge and the ongoing conflict in Flanders forced it to move to Reims in 1578 before returning to Douai in 1593.21 These earliest examples underline the basic point

in College communities abroad
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Ben Jonson’s admiration for Southwell’s ‘burning Babe’
Anne Sweeney

Pope had declared Elizabeth excommunicate six years earlier, and given English Catholics permission to consider her overthrow. 13 It therefore might be expected that those hoping for preferment at Court would be more than usually anxious to dissemble any family Catholicism. Despite this, and despite even the fact that his father was at that moment in Marshalsea prison accused of speaking against the

in Robert Southwell
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Carmen M. Mangion

English Catholic Church lacked the funds to develop the requisite number of Catholic educational institutions, which meant that the Catholic 18 H. Byerley Thomson, The Choice of a Profession: A Concise Account and Comparative Review of the English Professions (London: Chapman and Hall, 1857), pp. 1–2. 19 Holcombe, 1973, p. 19. 20 On 29 September 1850, Pope Pius IX re-established the English Catholic hierarchy, the canonical form of church government which included a hierarchy of bishops and archbishops who had episcopal authority over clergy and laity. See Chapter 1

in Contested identities
Raymond Gillespie

Again, the existing owners of estates could change confessional position. While George Touchet, earl of Castlehaven, may have seemed a safe pair of hands when he was granted his Ulster estates, after his death in 1616 his heir flirted with Catholicism and his brother was a committed Catholic. The third earl was likewise a committed Catholic, returning from a military career in Europe to fight for the Confederated Catholics in the 1640s. In addition, as the land market developed in the years after the plantation both English Catholics and Old English Catholics from the

in Irish Catholic identities
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Ulrike Ehret

divergence of English Catholics’ antisemitism from that of their German coreligionists was more visible among the general Catholic public. The differences lay not so much in the anti-Jewish images themselves, but in the emphasis that was placed on each stereotype, and the overall organisation of antisemitic prejudices. As a result, the nature of Catholic antisemitism in Germany was more secular, more nationalist and more systematic. Essentially, the antisemitism of German Catholics resembled more a modern ideology both in content and in its systematic formulation. Moreover

in Church, nation and race
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Laurence Lux-Sterritt

currently changing, but the process will be slow. Nuns are new players in a field which is not yet used to taking them into account, as testified by Gabriel Glickman’s omission of English convents in his otherwise thorough study of English Catholic life and Jacobite support.6 Aside from considerations about institutions and communities, beyond prescribed codes of conduct and affiliations, the archives of 252 MUP_Lux_Sterritt_Revised.indd 252 04/01/2017 14:50 CONCLUSION the English Benedictines also yield a veritable treasure of information about the lives of

in English Benedictine nuns in exile in the seventeenth century
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Carmen M. Mangion

C. Lutkehaus, eds, Gendered Missions: Women and Men in Missionary Discourse and Practice (Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Press, 1999). 15 Rhonda A. Semple, Missionary Women: Gender, Professionalism and the Victorian Idea of Christian Mission (Suffolk: Boydell & Brewer, 2003), p. 2. This text, like so many others in its genre, is based on Protestant missionary efforts. Historiography on nineteenth-century English Catholic women involved in overseas missionary work is sparse. The references to overseas missionary work by women religious tend to be

in Contested identities
Laurence Lux-Sterritt

did not have a vast pool of local benefactors, since they were mostly unknown to the indigenous populations and did not speak the same language – although some did become proficient French or Dutch speakers. The convents’ main supporters were English Catholics, either in exile themselves or back in England. Even a summary breakdown of the various sources of income reveals the great vulnerability of such resources. In Paris, for instance, a large proportion of the nuns’ money (4,664 livres tournois) came from England in the form of gifts from recusant patrons; a

in English Benedictine nuns in exile in the seventeenth century
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Oliver P. Rafferty

judged in the wider context of later medieval European Catholicism(s) as a whole. To what extent, then, did the burgeoning European devotional cultures of the later middle ages influence and shape practical Catholicism in Ireland? Did Catholics in Ireland regard themselves as part of a larger Catholic culture and, if so, how did this identity reconcile itself with assertions of distinctiveness? Furthermore, how different was one’s identity as an Anglo-Irish Catholic in the fifteenth century Pale from that of an English Catholic visitor, or indeed from the ‘mere Irish

in Irish Catholic identities