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Brian McFarlane

Marcia Landy, British Genres: Cinema and Society, 1930–1960, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1991, p. 272. 27 Monthly Film Bulletin, June 1947, p. 78. 28 Lionel Collier, ‘Shop for your films’, Picturegoer, 2 August 1947, p.12. 29 Kinematograph Weekly, 19 June 1947, p. 22. 30 Robert Murphy, Realism and Tinsel: Cinema and Society in Britain 1939–48, London: Routledge, 1989, p. 182. 31 Quoted in Andrew Spicer, Sydney Box, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2006, p. 210. 32 Sydney Box, ‘Puzzle – find the director’, in Peter Noble (ed.), The British

in Four from the forties
Comedies of class, culture and community
Nigel Mather

weaving which enables the factory to reopen at the close of the film, making the intervening period of unemployment depicted in the film seem as if it were merely an extended holiday for the workers in which they were able to enjoy a state of freedom and mobility normally denied to them. Marcia Landy in British Genres: Cinema and Society 1930–1960 (1991), however, warned against too easily assuming that 1930s audiences would

in Tears of laughter
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Brian McFarlane

1944, in Film Criticism and Caricatures: 1943–53, London: Paul Elek, 1975, p. 46. 42 Robert Murphy, Realism and Tinsel: Cinema and Society in Britain 1939–48, London: Routledge, 1989, p. 50. 43 Lockwood, pp. 108–9. 4 4 Robert Murphy, ‘Gainsborough after Balcon’, in Cook (ed.), Gainsborough Pictures, p. 143. 45 Arliss in Picturegoer, 10 November 1945, p. 7. 46 Lockwood, p. 108. 47 Barbara Klinger, Melodrama and Meaning, Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 199, p. 70. 48 Lockwood, p. 109. 49 Raymond Durgnat, Films and Feelings, London

in Four from the forties
Abstract only
Brian McFarlane

Rachael Low, Film Making in 1930s Britain, London: George Allen & Unwin, 1985, p. 142. 4 Peter Graham Scott, British Television: An Insider’s History, Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co., 2000, p. 12. 5 Petrie, British Cinematographer, p. 113. 6 Robert Murphy, Realism and Tinsel: Cinema and Society in Britain 1939–48, London: Routledge, 1989, p. 171. 7 Picturegoer, 11 November 1944, p. 5. 8 Lionel Collier, ‘Shop for your films’, Picturegoer, 26 May 1947, p. 12. 9 James Mason, Before I Forget, London: Hamish Hamilton, 1981, p. 143. 10 Monthly Film Bulletin, April 1945

in Four from the forties
Zheng Yangwen

: University of Chicago Press, 2006); Victor Fan, Cinema Approaching Reality: Locating Chinese Film Theory (St Paul: University of Minnesota Press, 2015); Bao Weihong, Fiery Cinema: The Emergence of an Affective Medium in China, 1915–1945 (St Paul: University of Minnesota Press, 2015). 34 Michael Berry, Speaking in Images: Interviews with Contemporary Chinese Filmmakers (New York: Columbia University Press, 2005); Zhang Zhen, ed., The Urban Generation: Chinese Cinema and Society at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century (Durham: Duke University Press, 2007

in Ten Lessons in Modern Chinese History
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The importance of cartoons, caricature, and satirical art in imperial contexts
Richard Scully and Andrekos Varnava

University Press, 2003; Stephen Clark, Travel Writing and Empire: Postcolonial Theory in Transit , London: Zed, 1999; Mary Louise Pratt, Imperial Eyes: Travel Writing and Transculturation , second edition, London: Routledge, 2007; James Burns, Cinema and Society in the British Empire, 1895–1940 , Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. 13 Brian Maidment, Comedy, Caricature and the Social Order, 1820–50 , Manchester and New York

in Comic empires
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Contested histories
Penny Summerfield and Corinna Peniston-Bird

Press, 1994 [1986]); J. Richards, Films and British National Identity: From Dickens to ‘Dad’s Army’ (Manchester: 21 Introduction 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 Manchester University Press, 1997); A. Aldgate and J. Richards, Best of British: Cinema and Society from 1930 to the Present (London: I. B. Tauris, 1999); J. Chapman, The British at War: Cinema, State and Propaganda, 1939–1945 (London: I. B. Tauris, 1998). A. Lant, Blackout: Reinventing Women for Wartime British Cinema (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1991); C. Gledhill

in Contesting home defence
Penny Summerfield and Corinna Peniston-Bird

, Britain 1939–45 (London: Panther Books, 1971), pp. 583–584. 4 V. Holman and D. Kelly, ‘Introduction. War in the Twentieth Century: The Functioning of Humour in Cultural Representation’, Journal of European Studies, 31:3–4 (2001), especially pp. 252–253 and 262. 5 See also C. Peniston-Bird and P. Summerfield, ‘“Hey, You’re Dead”: The Multiple Uses of Humour in Representations of British National Defence in the Second World War’, Journal of European Studies, 31:3–4 (2001), pp. 413– 435. 6 A. Aldgate and J. Richards, Best of British: Cinema and Society from 1930 to the

in Contesting home defence
Lucy Bland

remains the leading text on black GIs in wartime Britain. 15 Ministry of Information, British Public Feeling about America: A Report by Home Intelligence Division (London, 1943), FO 371/44601, TNA. 16 Jeffrey Richards, The Age of the Dream Palace: Cinema and Society in 1930s Britain (London, 2010); Richard Farmer, Cinemas and Cinemagoing in Wartime Britain, 1939–45 (Manchester, 2016). 17 Quoted in Sheila Ferguson and Hilde Fitzgerald, History of the Second World War: Studies in the Social Services (London, 1954), p. 97. See also Marilyn Lake, ‘The desire for a

in Britain’s ‘brown babies’
The growth in cinema-going and reading habits
Robert James

-going and reading habits personnel were also keen to understand it. Both attempted to improve it. The next chapter, then, assesses official attitudes towards both the cinema and popular fiction; Chapter 3 looks at trade attitudes towards them. Both chapters reveal contemporary attitudes towards working-class taste. Notes 1 A.J.P. Taylor is cited in Jeffrey Richards, The Age of the Dream Palace: Cinema and Society in Britain 1930–1939, London, 1984, p. 11. 2 H.L. Llewellyn Smith, ed., New Survey of London Life and Labour, vol. 9, London, 1935, pp. 43 and 47. 3 Simon

in Popular culture and working-class taste in Britain, 1930–39