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Mark Harvey

hand, and in a network of researchers clustered around the Applied Economics Department and the ESRC Centre for Business Research at Cambridge University, on the other. In an historical analysis of different forms of competition, Best argues that changing forms of competition are the outcome of complex interactions between industrial divisions and productive organisation, on the one hand, and formal competition regulatory systems, on the other. Thus, in the USA the multi-divisional Chandlerian corporation involved a form of competition in which Big Business mass

in Market relations and the competitive process
Jonathan Michie

7 Regulatory issues and industrial policy in football 1 Jonathan Michie and Christine Oughton Introduction The peculiar economics of professional sports leagues has long been recognised (see Neale, 1964). Traditionally, the essence of the problem was seen to lie in the fact that sports leagues and the individual clubs that make up the league provide a joint product that depends on effective co-operation between competing clubs. Clubs agree to join, and be regulated by, a league because co-operation in the supply of a joint product increases the economic value

in Market relations and the competitive process
The Foundation Economy Collective

technical policy for ‘steering the economy’ without recognising the broader context of Keynes’ thinking, especially in The End of Laissez Faire (1926), about the role of intermediary institutions which are outside 88 Foundational economy of the state and the market but play important roles in promoting social objectives. The aim of this chapter is to re-establish the connection between technical policy and political philosophy which has (despite spirited challenges) since been ossified by the tripartite academic division of labour between economics, politics and

in Foundational economy
Abstract only
Frugality, de-growth and Voluntary Simplicity
Alison Hulme

 al., 2006; Scott-​Cato, 2006). In addition, many commentators feel the term does not sufficiently recognise the role of capitalism in environmental destruction, or that it is capitalism rather than environmental practice that needs to change (see Malm, 2016; Sklair, 2016). Much, but not all, of this critique of neo-​ classical economics and its assumptions of the necessity of growth are explicitly anti-​capitalist. Here, Andreas Malm’s work on ‘fossil capital’ is key. Malm argued that the shift to steam power took place essentially because it allowed capitalists to better

in A brief history of thrift
Abstract only
Keynes, consumer rights and the new thrifty consumers
Alison Hulme

, home economics, calls for improved food and drug laws, the cooperative movement, the labour movement, fledgling consumer organisations and leftist politics. In 1929 democratic and educational theorist John Dewey and progressive economist Paul Douglas founded a new third party, the League for Independent Political Action, around the interests of consumers, saying ‘the needs and troubles of the people are connected with problems of consumption, with problems of the maintenance of a reasonably decent and secure standard of living’. They felt the other parties were

in A brief history of thrift
Abstract only
Alison Hulme

1 Introduction At the conclusion of my last book –​On the Commodity Trail –​I asserted that consumptive thrift (i.e. that which essentially still encourages spending, but as part of seeking a ‘bargain’) was, in the current age, the only type of thrift fully condoned by those in positions of power in the West. Furthermore, I argued, it was used to obscure the fact that trickle-​down economics have failed both the developed and the developing world. Consumptive thrift, I argued, required people to consume; insisted upon itself as an activity engaged in, not in

in A brief history of thrift
Don Slater

thought It is in relation to markets that goods are most obviously conceptually stabilised within economic thought. (For a full discussion of the argument presented in this section, see Slater, 2002.) In everyday language, we define markets as markets for particular goods: there are markets for consumer electronics, or cars, or clothes. Similarly, marketing directors or financial analysts are concerned with futures markets or housing markets. And this is fundamental to both conventional economics and critical economic discourses: markets are delineated by virtue of

in Market relations and the competitive process
Costas Simitis

Bruegel is a European think-tank specializing in economics. Its membership includes EU member state governments, international corporations and institutions.  2 Jean Pisani-Ferry, André Sapir and Guntram Wolff, EU–IMF Assistance to the Euro-Area Countries: An Early Assessment, Bruegel, May 2013.   3 Ibid., pp. 44, 54.   4 Ibid., p. 60.   5 Ibid., p. 51.   6 Ibid., p. 51.   7 Ibid., p. 56.   8 Ibid., p. 93.   9 Ibid., p. 65. 10 See pp. 61, 196ff. 11 Pisani-Ferry et al., EU–IMF Assistance to Euro-Area Countries, p. 53. 12 Ibid., p. 118. 13 Ibid., p. 65. 14

in The European debt crisis
The Foundation Economy Collective

view of the scope and importance of a kind of invisible economy whose goods and services lie at the foundation of everyday civilised life. The singular economy: GDP and knowledge-intensive business services The roots of this invisibility lie in the way academic economic language, and the policymakers who borrow from it, think and talk about ‘the economy’. They construct a field of the visible – and as a result make important things invisible. Although there are many kinds of economics (mainstream and heterodox) in our time, they generally share a view of the world in

in Foundational economy
Seeking a new solution
Costas Simitis

.   2 See M. Wolf, ‘Economie’, Le Monde, 24 May 2011, p. 2.  3 FAZ, 20 April 2011, p. 9; see also, N. Economides, Economics section, Kathimerini, 23–24 April 2011 p. 6.  4 ‘Economie’, Le Monde, 10 May 2011, p. 14.   5 See ‘Restructuring a horror scenario’, Kathimerini, 25 May 2011.   6 G. Papaconstantinou, Kathimerini, 5 April 2011, p. 23.   7 Issue 15, 2011, p. 66.  8 Ekthesi gia to etos 2011, Trapeza tis Ellados, April 2012.  9 See Kathimerini, 7 May 2011, p. 4. 10 See Kathimerini, 30 December 2011, p. 16, which refers to a Wall Street Journal report. 11

in The European debt crisis