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Power dynamics disclosed in Tania Bruguera’s Endgame
Luz María Sánchez Cardona

In April 2017 Cuban artist and activist Tania Bruguera had her directorial debut at the Biennial of Contemporary Arts (BoCA) in Porto (Portugal), introducing her personal take on Samuel Beckett's Endgame , a play that she has been acquainted with since 1998, from her early years as an art student and practitioner. 1 The international visibility that Bruguera's short- and long-term projects have obtained in recent years makes her approach to Beckett's Endgame interesting to follow. It is

in Beckett’s afterlives
Ruvani Ranasinha

holding court in a black corner: the leather-trousered misanthropist invited me to join the usual coterie of hunchbacked drones who were all busily engaged in stroking the Ego.’ Still, his talent was recognised. Talgarth Times reviewed The King and Me as ‘an excellent piece of dramatization written and acted with dedication enough to hold any audience’. Meanwhile, the writing life was hardly sufficient to keep him and Sally afloat financially. He even asked Samuel Beckett for a loan in 1979, a story he loved to retell. It marked a proximity to

in Hanif Kureishi
Ulrika Maude

. Attridge , Derek ( 2011 ), ‘ Once More with Feeling: Art, Affect and Performance ’, Textual Practice , 25 : 2 , pp. 329–43 . ‘ Automatic Obedience ’, APA Dictionary of Psychology , https://dictionary.apa.org/automatic-obedience (accessed 24 October 2019). Beckett , Samuel ( 1998 ), No Author Better Served: The Correspondence of Samuel Beckett and Alan Schneider , ed

in Beckett and media
Anna Sigg

’ (200) – the sound of embers. References Alpaugh, David J. (1973). ‘Embers and the Sea: Beckettian Intimations of Mortality’, Modern Drama 16.3–4, 317–28. Beckett, Samuel (2006a). Samuel Beckett, Volume 3: Dramatic Works. New York: Grove Press. Beckett, Samuel (2006b). Samuel Beckett: Works for Radio — The Original Broadcasts. British Library Publishing Division, BBC [Audio CD]. Boulter, Jonathan (2004). ‘Does Mourning Require a Subject? Samuel Beckett’s Texts for Nothing’, Modern Fiction Studies 50.2, 332–50. Branigan, Kevin (2008). Radio Beckett: Musicality in the

in Samuel Beckett and trauma
Authority in Mercier and Camier
Daniela Caselli

narrator within the texts of Mercier et/and Camier and that of the author-function Samuel Beckett, the instance responsible for the characters appearing and reappearing in the texts which bear his name. For instance, the ‘old man of weird and wretched aspect, carrying under his arm what looked like a board folded in two’ (75–76) and the ‘ragged shaggy old man plodding along beside a donkey’ (77) are both images shared with The End/La fin (67; 112–113 and 58; 97). Moreover, Mercier’s memory of having seen the old man somewhere before is followed by that of the old man

in Beckett’s Dantes
Abstract only
Pim Verhulst
,
Anna McMullan
, and
Jonathan Bignell

the audience that knows the adapted text as it is for the one that does not’, or would the latter ‘simply experience the adaptation as we would any other work?’ ( 2013 : 120) Put differently, ‘what if we never read the novels upon which they are based? Do the novels then effectively become the derivative and belated works, the ones we experience second and secondarily?’ ( 2013 : 122). This reality is what places the estate of Samuel Beckett in such a difficult position, charged as it is with looking after the author's legacy, preserving or conserving his work as

in Beckett’s afterlives
Remediating theatre through radio
Pim Verhulst

( 2009 ), which devotes a chapter to ‘Hearing Beckett’, but Anna McMullan's monumental study, Performing Embodiment in Samuel Beckett's Drama ( 2010 ), in particular, deserves special mention here. For McMullan, ‘the bodies of Beckett's late drama are intermedial’, because ‘Beckett uses characteristic properties of presenting or projecting the body in one medium, and uses them to refigure the possibilities and properties of another’ (McMullan, 2010 , 56). ‘In the radiophonic medium’, McMullan points out, ‘the body is not defined by the visual body image, but is

in Beckett and media
Company SJ’s staging of Beckett’s Company
Anna McMullan

Beckett's late prose work into the medium of live performance. She had previously staged Company in 1990, and again at the Project Arts Centre in 2004, remounted at the Samuel Beckett Theatre, Trinity College Dublin, in 2006. The 2006 version I saw featured a male performer (Jack Walsh) in a loincloth lit against a dark stage as in many of Beckett's late plays, with the text spoken as voice-over by Scaife herself. At times, when the voice-over evoked a life scene, a fragment or shadow of the scene appeared in the darkness, as when, returning home from the local shops

in Beckett’s afterlives
Mariko Hori Tanaka

). Beckett Writing Beckett: The Author in the Autograph. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. Adorno, Theodor W. (2001). Metaphysics: Concept and Problems. Ed. Rolf Tiedemann. Trans. Edmund Jephcott. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Barry, Elizabeth (2006). Beckett and Authority: The Uses of Cliché. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Beckett, Samuel (1990). The Complete Dramatic Works. London: Faber and Faber. Beckett, Samuel (2011). The Letters of Samuel Beckett 1941–1956. Ed. George Craig, Martha Dow Fehsenfeld, Dan Gunn and Lois More Overbeck. Cambridge

in Samuel Beckett and trauma
Daniela Caselli

1 Letter to Donald McWhinnie, 6 April 1960 (RUL) quoted in James Knowlson, Damned to Fame: The Life of Samuel Beckett (London: Bloomsbury, 1996), pp. 461–462. 2 Ruby Cohn, A Beckett Canon (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001), pp. 256–257. 3 Teodolinda Barolini, The Undivine Comedy. Detheologizing Dante (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1992), p. 25. Neal Oxenhandler, ‘Seeing and believing in Dante and Beckett’, in Mary Ann Caws (ed.), Writing in a Modern Temper: Essays on French Literature

in Beckett’s Dantes