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National trends in film popularity
Robert James

compilers. It referred to the practice of patrons from one cinema visiting an alternative cinema to watch a particular film. Comments on 1932 Questionnaire, SLB. Marcia Landy, British Genres. Cinema and Society, 1930–1960, Princeton, 1991, p. 433. The results of this survey are reproduced in Richards and Sheridan, eds, MassObservation, pp. 21–136. Ibid., pp. 32–33. Ibid., pp. 27–31. Ibid., pp. 29–30. Kineweekly, 8 August 1935. Richards and Sheridan, eds, Mass-Observation, William Turnock, aged 18. Ibid., James Hutchinson, aged 18. Ibid., p. 52, Mr A. Wiggans, aged 60

in Popular culture and working-class taste in Britain, 1930–39
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Imagining and planning for death in wartime
Lucy Noakes

, Literature and Conservatism Between the Wars (London: Routledge, 1991); M. Francis, ‘The domestication of the male? Recent research on nineteenth and twentieth century masculinity’, Historical Journal, 45:3 (2002) pp. 637–52. 25 J. Sedgwick, Popular Film Going in 1930s Britain: A Choice of Pleasures (Exeter: Exeter University Press, 2000), p. 78, 272; J. Richards, The Age of the Dream Palace: Cinema and Society in 1930s Britain (London: I. B. Tauris, 1984), p. 282. 26 Holman, The Next War in the Air, p. 60. 27 Miles, The Gas War of 1940 (London: Eric Partridge at the

in Dying for the nation
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Patrick Chaplin

& Nicolson, 1984), pp. 178 and 185–6. Gareth Stedman Jones, ‘Working-class culture and working-class politics in London 1870–1900: notes on the remaking of a working class’ in his Languages of Class – Studies in Working Class History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984), p. 237. Stephen Jones, Workers at Play – A Social and Economic History of Leisure 1918–1939 (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1986), pp. 4–7. Jeffrey Richards, The Age of the Dream Palace – Cinema and Society in Britain 1930–1939 (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1984). John K. Walton, The English

in Darts in England, 1900–39
Patrick Chaplin

, Association Football and English Society 1863–1915 (Brighton: Harvester Press, 1981), p. 242. Thompson, The Edwardians, p. 272. National Council on Public Morals, The Cinema – Its Present Position and Future Possibilities (London, 1917), p. xxiv, cited by Jeffrey Richards, The Age of the Dream Palace – Cinema and Society in Britain 1930–1939 (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1984), p. 12. James Walvin, Leisure and Society 1830–1950 (London: Longman Group, 1978), pp. 133–4. Elizabeth Roberts, A Woman’s Place – An Oral History of Working Class Women 1890–1940 (London: Basil

in Darts in England, 1900–39
Patrick Chaplin

, Seventy Rolling Years (London: Faber & Faber, 1958), pp. 76 and 104. Ted Elkins, Our Trade – The Story of the Major Associations of Interest to the Licensed Victualler (Shepton Mallet: Showerings, 1978), p. 118. The Association was formed primarily ‘to combat the open, and also the more or less veiled activity of teetotallers’ (p. 118). Oliver, Renaissance of the English Public House, p. 21. Jeffrey Richards, The Age of the Dream Palace – Cinema and Society in Britain 1930–1939 (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1984), pp. 11–12. Roy Armes, A Critical History of the

in Darts in England, 1900–39
Melanie Tebbutt

, The Age of the Dream Palace: Cinema and Society in Britain 1930–39 (London, Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1984), pp. 13–14. See also, John Sedgwick, Popular Filmgoing in the 1930s: A Choice of Pleasures (Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 2000). Morgan, Needs of Youth, p. 239. H. E. O. James and F. T. Moore, ‘Adolescent leisure in a working class district: Part I’, Occupational Psychology, 14:3 (1940), 132–45. R. McKibbin, Classes and Cultures: England, 1918–51 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998), p. 419–21. Harley, J.L., ‘Report of an enquiry into the occupations

in Being boys
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Melanie Tebbutt

Schoolchildren and Adolescents in the City (Edinburgh: Edinburgh City Library, 1933), pp. 14–18, cited in J. Richards, The Age of the Dream Palace: Cinema and Society in Britain, 1930–39 (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1984), p. 69; Kuhn, An Everyday Magic, pp. 147–8. 99 Norman MacDonald, ‘The Cinema Culture in 1930s Britain’, CCINTB. 100 ‘Diary’ (15 February 1936). 101 Ibid. (13 May 1936). 102 Ibid. (3 November 1936; 19 November 1936). 103 M. Eavis, ‘The picture palaces of Northampton, with particular reference to the • TEBBUTT 9780719066139 PRINT.indd 166 166 • 06

in Being boys
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Melanie Tebbutt

. G., Jones, Workers at Play: A Social and Economic History of Leisure, 1918–39 (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1986), p. 80. See also, • TEBBUTT 9780719066139 PRINT.indd 254 254 • 06/02/2012 15:00 place and mobility 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 K. Boyd, Manliness and the Boys’ Story Paper in Britain: A Cultural History, 1855–1940 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003). J. Mackie (ed.), The Edinburgh Cinema Enquiry (Edinburgh, 1933, pp.14–18, cited in J. Richards, The Age of the Dream Palace: Cinema and

in Being boys
Panikos Panayi

, for instance, David A. Welch, ‘Cinema and Society in Imperial Germany, 1905–1918’, German History, vol. 8 (1990), 28–45. Bauer, 1915–1918, p. 52; MNH/B115/43q, Camp IV, Knockaloe, I. O. M., Final Report and Statistical Record on the Internal Administration of the Prisoners of War Camp No. IV, 1915–1919. Werden, May 1915. Friedrich Ruge, Scapa Flow 1919: The End of the German Fleet (London, 1973), p. 130. Tony Mason and Eliza Riedi, Sport and the Military: The British Armed Forces, 1880–1960 (Cambridge, 2010), pp. 80–111. Charles Korr and Marvin Close, More than Just

in Prisoners of Britain
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Claire Hines

. In her analysis, Mulvey sets out to highlight the dominant patriarchal structures of cinema and society. She defines scopophilia as ‘pleasure in looking’, which she says is gendered in relation to spectatorship and the male gaze. ‘In a world ordered by sexual imbalance,’ writes Mulvey, ‘pleasure in looking has been split between active/male and passive/female. The determining male gaze projects its phantasy on to the female figure which is styled accordingly.’ She further argues that, ‘In their traditional exhibitionist role women are simultaneously looked at and

in The playboy and James Bond