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Abstract only
Gordon Pirie

registered a new challenger. After a succession of promising private flights from Britain into the Empire, a sparse British imperial landplane network was achieved only gradually. At territorial outposts in the Colonies and Dominions, expatriate administrators and surveyors used local labourers to construct landing grounds, and then to staff the refuelling and rest stops. Under indirect rule, local chiefs

in Air empire
Mark Hampton

highlight what the theme of British leisure did not entail: either high culture or British popular culture. As May Holdsworth notes, most western expatriates, at least until the 1980s, ‘thought Hong Kong merely provincial and its denizens philistine. The place had no culture.’ As an illustration, she tells the story of a Jardines executive giving a forty-eight-page booklet entitled The Artistic and

in Hong Kong and British culture, 1945–97
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Georgina Sinclair

expatriate officers who commanded a locally recruited rank and file. The numbers of colonial constabularies fluctuated with the changing shape of the Empire: independence in a colony led to the disbandment of a police force. With the onset of decolonisation following the Second World War, many expatriate police officers sought employment elsewhere; a significant number stayed on within the police forces of

in At the end of the line
The German community in Shanghai, 1933-1945
Françoise Kreissler

really concerning themselves with the underlying ideology, the Germans in Shanghai were at first highly sympathetic to Chancellor Hitler’s government, which stood up against the democratic powers and announced that the main object of its foreign policy was to wipe away the indignity of the Treaty of Versailles. Such a policy immediately found support within the communities of German expatriates. Germany’s strong man had promised to return to the German people the honour which they had lost in 1918, but, as the months and years went by

in New frontiers
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Garden cities and colonial planning: transnationality and urban ideas in Africa and Palestine
Liora Bigon

referred to in colonial planning literature in terms of ‘development’, ‘betterment’, ‘efficiency’ and the like, reflecting the apparent scientific and rational facets of the colonial enterprise. British and French town planning policies, intended for the benefit of the expatriates rather than that of the colonised populations, were most blatant in Africa. At this point, as we shall

in Garden cities and colonial planning
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Returned migrants and the Canada Club
Kathleen Burke

Nevertheless, membership remained limited, and perhaps because of the relatively small number of members, the club soon acquired, among expatriate Canadians at least, an exclusive reputation, especially because every visiting politician or businessman of note attended Club dinners when visiting London, these visitors including such diverse figures as Sir John A. Macdonald and the venerable Archbishop John Strachan. Returned migrants Given the increasing cachet of Club membership, it is easy to understand why some returned

in Emigrant homecomings
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The British Empire Exhibition and national histories of art
Christine Boyanoski

organising national exhibitions abroad. 20 In this way, central control could be exercised over all aspects of each national presentation, including the fine arts. One reason for the exclusion of expatriate artists from the Australian, New Zealand and South African sections was the logistical complexity of adding work sight-unseen after the final selection had been made at home; but, more importantly, it would have meant the loss of official control over the final presentation. In Canada, where the selection committee enjoyed

in Rethinking settler colonialism
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Multilateral channels, garden cities and colonial planning
Liora Bigon
and
Yossi Katz

‘garden city’ neighbourhoods were the preferred form of residence offered by the colonial authorities to their employees and other white expatriates. Though there were some exceptions, normally in the form of layout or model housing intended for the African (Zanzibar) or the Indian (South Africa) urban population, these also celebrated the colonial power. In the context of colonial Palestine during the second

in Garden cities and colonial planning
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Gordon Pirie

Indiscreet display is precisely how John Bull commentators would have distinguished the French and British air empires. Concern about expatriate behaviour and reputations when off duty could be compounded by anxiety about the agents who represented and acted for Imperial Airways overseas. At Moshi, a minor Tanganyikan airfield, the local hotel proprietor

in Cultures and caricatures of British imperial aviation
Gordon Pirie

obliteration. Civilisation might be served in another way too: aircraft could assist archaeological discovery, itself worthy of an Empire ‘interested in more than just material things’. Airships were set to alter the ‘social structure of the Empire’ by encouraging Empire settlement, not by replacing migrant ships, but by expediting the exchange of letters and enabling expatriates to return home quickly for

in Air empire