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Hilary Charlesworth and Christine Chinkin

Introduction Treaties have become increasingly important throughout the twentieth century as a means of securing states’ commitment to legal obligations. 1 The major advantages of treaties as a source of international law are perceived to be the certainty of a written text and the comparative ease of determining the parties. The wide acceptance of the Vienna Convention on

in The boundaries of international law
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Laurence Boisson de Chazournes

The discussions we had during the Fifth Annual Conference of the African Society of International Law were rich and dense. They highlighted that the relationships between the promotion and protection of foreign investment and law in its various dimensions are multifaceted. It is through this prism that I will address the three following themes: first, investment

in African perspectives in international investment law
Abstract only

Scope of the book This book is concerned with the public international law of the sea – that is to say, with the rules and principles that bind States in their international relations concerning maritime matters. Accordingly, it does not discuss, except incidentally, the rules of private maritime law, which concern matters such as marine insurance, carriage of goods by sea

in The law of the sea
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Imperialism and the (de)composition of law
Peter Fitzpatrick

Americas – dominium as a combination of sovereign and proprietary title – and fathered international law – and provided a consummate legitimation for one of the more spectacularly rapacious imperial powers. Beginning with Vitoria and that ambivalence, this chapter offers a brief history of imperial law, focusing ultimately on its terminal failure in colonialism. What this

in Law, history, colonialism
Leslie C. Green

Classic position Historically, international law is concerned only with the relations between states. As a result, the law of armed conflict developed in relation to inter-state conflicts and was not in any way concerned with conflicts occurring within the territory of any state or with a conflict between an imperial power and a colonial

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Nigel D. White

While the primary rules of international law are those norms applicable to IGOs in their decisions and operations, such as those rules governing the use of force or those protecting human rights, secondary rules of responsibility are concerned with the consequences of breach of those rules by an organisation, sometimes known as liability, although liability ‘has a broader meaning; it also refers to acts that are not unlawful (but cause damage)’. 1 IGOs possessing separate international legal personality are responsible for their internationally wrongful acts

in The law of international organisations (third edition)
Making progress?
Author: Casper Sylvest

This book explores the development, character and legacy of the ideology of liberal internationalism in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Britain. Liberal internationalism provided a powerful way of theorising and imagining international relations, and it dominated well-informed political discourse at a time when Britain was the most powerful country in the world. Its proponents focused on securing progress, generating order and enacting justice in international affairs, and it united a diverse group of intellectuals and public figures, leaving a lasting legacy in the twentieth century. The book elucidates the roots, trajectory and diversity of liberal internationalism, focusing in particular on three intellectual languages – international law, philosophy and history – through which it was promulgated, before tracing the impact of these ideas across the defining moment of the First World War. The liberal internationalist vision of the late nineteenth century remained popular well into the twentieth century and forms an important backdrop to the development of the academic study of International Relations in Britain.

Leslie C. Green

committed within a belligerent’s lines and intended to harm and aid the adverse party. However, such acts are offences only against the law of the particular belligerent, and, since they are not forbidden by international law, do not constitute war crimes in the proper sense of the term. The concept of war crimes, with trial and condemnation of those committing them, is not new. In ancient Greece ‘treacherous

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Leslie C. Green

The traditional view One of the longest and best established principles of international law has been that which recognises that states have no right to intervene in the internal or domestic affairs of another state. This principle receives conventional recognition in Article 2 (7) of the Charter of the United Nations, which declares that

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Hilary Charlesworth and Christine Chinkin

Introduction The world of international law has changed profoundly since this book was first published over twenty years ago. In 1999, when we finished writing Boundaries , international law was in a period of renaissance. The ending of the Cold War between the West and the Soviet bloc, symbolised by the dismantling of the Berlin Wall in 1989, appeared to have freed

in The boundaries of international law