Search results

You are looking at 71 - 80 of 3,677 items for :

  • "migration" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Sarah Hackett

previous chapters and offers an in-depth overview and assessment of the existing historiography, and addresses the extent to which there has existed a rural dimension to the integration process. An insight into the academic literature on migration, race and Muslim communities in rural Britain was offered in this book’s introduction, and there are clear overlaps with that on rural Britain more broadly. The concept of the rural idyll has meant that rural settings have overwhelmingly been perceived as being untouched by immigration and ethnic minority communities, and thus

in Britain’s rural Muslims
Borders and images in migration narratives published in Norwegian
Johan Schimanski

limits between snow and sky is exchanged for the sublime – but strikingly reassuring – juxtaposition of sea and mountains, pointing to similar evocations in other migration narratives, such as those of Romeo Gill and Sara Azmeh Rasmussen, which I will address below. However, as a highly affective and symbolic mobilisation of stereotypes of Northernness, Amelie's description is surprisingly atypical. Most migration narratives like hers published in Norwegian, dealing with first- or so-called 1.5-generation migrants (born abroad but growing up in Norway), tend to avoid

in Border images, border narratives
Leif Eiriksson, the 1893 World’s Fair, and the Great Lakes landnám
Amy C. Mulligan

American Midwest in particular. While books and translations were most influential in getting the story of Viking America out – figures like the popular Norwegian-American scholar Anderson were doing much to promote the stories of Leif Eiriksson and a Nordic America that went back to the Middle Ages – performances, staged spectacles, and audience experiences of staged recreations of medieval events, spaces, and voyages cemented the migration of the Viking landnám onto Lake Michigan. The story begins in 1880, when a ninth-century Viking ship was uncovered in a burial

in From Iceland to the Americas
Middle-Aged Syrian Women’s Contributions to Family Livelihoods during Protracted Displacement in Jordan
Dina Sidhva, Ann-Christin Zuntz, Ruba al Akash, Ayat Nashwan, and Areej Al-Majali

governance in Jordan. Recent scholarship on gender and forced migration emphasises ‘women’s multiple positions within conflict and displacement situations, and […] female agency rather than depicting women as non-agentic victims’ ( Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, 2014 : 395; cf. Hajdukowski-Ahmed et al. , 2008 ; Freedman et al. , 2017 ). Still, women seem to be visible in the Syria humanitarian response in binary ways, either as victims (of gender

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Experience of Dislocated Listening
Rashida K. Braggs

“It is only in his music [. . .] that the Negro in America has been able to tell his story. It is a story which otherwise has yet to be told and which no American is prepared to hear,” so wrote James Baldwin in “Many Thousands Gone.” Throughout his career, James Baldwin returned to this incomprehension of African-American experience. He continually privileged music in his literature, crafting his own literary blues to address it. Baldwin’s blues resonated even more powerfully and painfully for its emotional and geographical dislocation. In this article, Rashida K. Braggs argues that it was the combination of music, word, and migration that prompted Baldwin’s own deeper understanding. Exploring her term dislocated listening, Braggs investigates how listening to music while willfully dislocated from one’s cultural home prompts a deeper understanding of African-American experience. The distance disconcerts, leaving one more vulnerable, while music impels the reader, audience, and even Baldwin to identify with some harsh realities of African-American experience. Baldwin evokes the experience of dislocated listening in his life and in “Sonny’s Blues.” Braggs also creates an experience of dislocated listening through her video performance of Baldwin’s words, thus attempting to draw the reader as well into a more attuned understanding of African-American experience.

James Baldwin Review
German Responses to the June 2019 Mission of the Sea-Watch 3
Klaus Neumann

-named Triton, which, however, did not result in a decrease of drownings in the Mediterranean. Privately funded NGOs have carried out SAR missions in the Mediterranean since August 2014, when Migration Offshore Aid Station (MOAS), which was founded and largely funded by Maltese-based entrepreneurs Christopher and Regina Catrambone, commenced SAR operations with its rescue vessel M/Y Phoenix . MOAS was soon joined by established humanitarian organisations such as Save the Children and NGOs specifically set up to carry out SAR missions. Their approaches varied, with MOAS and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
An Interview with Caroline Abu Sa’Da, General Director of SOS MEDITERRANEE Suisse
Juliano Fiori

people access to information – facts – on the situation in the Mediterranean, so that they at least are able to form their own judgement on it. They can then decide whether they have a responsibility. Definitely the need is there. After eleven years with MSF, it was really this kind of political and social engagement that interested me. SOS is a ‘hydroponic NGO’, if I may put it like that – nourished from below. Working with the organisation in Switzerland is particularly interesting, given that the country is not very open-minded on migration. It

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Anne Ring Petersen

Mining the museum in an age of migration Migratory aesthetics and artists with a migrant background can have various points of entry into museums, galleries and collections. The genre of artists’ interventions is one of the most important in this regard because of its critical, transformative and bridge-building potential. After a brief introduction to the practice, this chapter examines interventions by three artists, Fred Wilson, Yinka Shonibare and Rina Banerjee, who all take a critical de- and postcolonial approach to the institutional structures and spaces

in Migration into art
Maria Cioată

This article presents a forgotten manuscript of a personal account of one of the first Jewish settlers who departed from Romania to Palestine in 1882 and helped found the colony of Samarin, which was later taken over by Baron de Rothschild and renamed Zichron Yaakov. Friedrich Horn, a schoolmaster with Austrian nationality who had settled in Romania fifteen years before his departure to Palestine, gave the manuscript of his unfinished work Nationaltraum der Juden to Moses Gaster. Gaster kept it among his collection of manuscripts. He considered it a diary rather than as Horn obviously had in mind, a contribution to historiography intended to be published. The text provides significant evidence concerning the underappreciated role of Jews from Romania in the historiography of Zionism.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Stories from modern nomads

On the global stage the British diaspora, proportionate to its population, remains one of the largest. This book is the first social history to explore experiences of British emigrants from the peak years of the 1960s to the emigration resurgence of the turn of the twentieth century. It explores migrant experiences in Australia, Canada and New Zealand alongside other countries. The book charts the gradual reinvention of the 'British diaspora' from a postwar migration of austerity to a modern migration of prosperity. It is divided into two parts. First part presents a decade-by-decade chronology of changes in migration patterns and experience, progressing gradually from the postwar migration of austerity to a more discretionary mobility of affluence. It discusses 'pioneers of modern mobility'; the 1970s rise in non-white migration and the decline of British privilege in the old Commonwealth countries of white settlement; 'Thatcher's refugees' and cosmopolitanism and 'lifestyle' migration. Second part shifts from a chronological to a thematic focus, by drilling down into some of the more prominent themes encountered. It explores the interplay of patterns of change and continuity in the migrant careers of skilled workers, trade unionists, professionals and mobile academics. The push and pull of private life, migration to transform a way of life, and migrant and return experiences discussed highlight the underlying theme of continuity amidst change. The long process of change from the 1960s to patterns of discretionary, treechange and nomadic migration became more common practice from the end of the twentieth century.