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Under-investment and confusion marketing
Andrew Bowman, Ismail Ertürk, Julie Froud, Sukhdev Johal, and John Law

market share. Far from curbing such behaviours, regulatory intervention has produced perverse and unintended secondary consequences. The opening of BT’s exchange network to competitors since 2006, has allowed BT to create a new, profitable Openreach division from the rents it charges competitors. In the telecoms sector, as in other utilities, regulators face an insoluble dilemma: if prices are forced down so that margins are reduced, then private investment will not be forthcoming. And so the regulatory agency becomes the promoter of Braudelian monopoly as the

in The end of the experiment?
Open Access (free)
Oonagh McDonald

obligations to federal and state governments, as well as regulators at each level of government. This mosaic of rules and regulations, and the various authorities and mechanisms by which they are implemented and enforced, make for an environment of frequent change and evolution. 1 That is certainly an understatement. The patchwork leads to confusion. It is entirely unclear which set of rules takes precedence over the others, where they conflict or appear to conflict. To an outsider that is a

in Lehman Brothers
Adam Hedgecoe

process typically presented as impersonal, methodologically mechanical, and in service to the ‘rule of rule’ – painting a picture that emphasises the central role of trust in such decisions, their local, embedded nature, and the importance of personal knowledge of researchers. The central insight of this book is that, to paraphrase Shapin, the closer you get to the heart of research ethics review, the greater is the acknowledged role of the personal, the familiar, and even the charismatic. In presenting RECs as a form of regulator, I am acknowledging John Abraham

in Trust in the system
Abstract only
Claudio M. Radaelli and Fabrizio De Francesco

process of rule-making and implementation than about reforms sector by sector. As such, it is an instance of meta-regulation. Its major aim is to address regulatory failure, rather than market failure. It is an instance of regulators governing themselves and the processes through which rules are created and enforced. Typically, meta-regulation is appraised on the basis of how effective it is in streamlining the regulatory policy process (in relation to objectives that include transparency, participation of stakeholders, accountability and evidence-based or evidence

in Regulatory quality in Europe
The cross-national experience
Claudio M. Radaelli and Fabrizio De Francesco

. Accordingly, it turned its attention to anecdotal evidence of the quality of regulatory decisions. For the Treasury Board it is more important to gauge whether departments have internalised the new regulatory culture than to produce a final indicator of success. Structured interviews of a sample of regulators have measured the change in their perception of the usefulness of RIA (in the context of a systematic external evaluation of RIA: Regulatory 86 Regulatory quality in Europe Box 4.3 Standards of regulatory process: a self-assessment checklist Internal management

in Regulatory quality in Europe
Abstract only
Ed Randall

regulators at the heart of British government with a forum in which they could try and ‘secure coherence and consistency within and between policy and practice in risk assessments undertaken by Government’. ILGRA was succeeded by a team working on risk within the Cabinet Office’s Strategy Unit. Its report, ‘Risk: Improving Government’s Capability to Handle Risk and Uncertainty’ (Strategy Unit, 2002), has become one of a series of substantial and impressive publications and initiatives. These include the developing role of the Civil Contingencies Secretariat (CCS) in the

in Food, risk and politics
Open Access (free)
Mark B. Brown

range of issues and types of participants in only some respects, while restricting them in others. Chapter 10, by Sarah Hartley and Adam Kokotovich, challenges the standard view of risk governance by disaggregating the riskassessment stage into different components. The authors argue that public involvement is necessary whenever regulators make choices about values, and they identify a need for value-laden choices in three components of risk assessment: risk-assessment guidelines, the process of conducting risk assessments and the use of scientific studies within risk

in Science and the politics of openness
Abstract only
Regulatory giraffes?
Adam Hedgecoe

focus. Yet the AMS final report largely ignores ethics review, suggesting that: ‘NRES and its predecessor, the Central Office for Research Ethics Committees (COREC), have made substantial improvements to the process of ethics review … streamlining regulatory and governance processes in the UK’. 5 The organisation that is currently responsible for coordinating RECs in England (and which de facto sets the standards for the other parts of the UK) the HRA, grew out of the AMS recommendation that a single regulator be set up ‘to oversee the regulation and governance of

in Trust in the system
Abstract only
Peter Kalu

. All for a couple of pounds, and now and then a wiper or wing-mirror gone. Pretty similar to Knowsley Safari, but only five pounds. ‘Let’s do it again, Daddy, let’s do it again!’ 35  (Previous page) Soapsuds on a windscreen 134 Work He’s squirted foam on my wheels and wants me to inch the car forward. A double-palm stop again. Car washes have minimal set-up costs, no regulation, and I presume it is easy for owners, if they get into scrapes with licensing, tax or other regulators, to dissolve, disappear, fly. They are a fording point to other things, a wonky

in Manchester
In search of political leadership
Shizuka Oshitani

number of successes. The EST, however, soon faced a financial crisis. The government originally intended to finance it until the gas and electricity markets were fully liberalised in 1998,4 with contributions from British Gas and the RECs, which in turn would impose a levy on gas and electricity bills in the form of an ‘E’ factor. The ‘E’ factor was a brainchild of the first Director-General of Ofgas, the regulator for the gas industry, Sir James McKinnon. The levy would be passed onto consumers only when the Director-General judged that the energy efficiency programmes

in Global warming policy in Japan and Britain