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Watt’s unwelcome home
John Robert Keller

90 Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love 3 This emptied heart: Watt’s unwelcome home Beckett’s second published novel, Watt, tells the story of the title character’s journey to, stay in, and expulsion from the house of a Mr Knott, to which he has been drawn, or summoned, to act as a servant. After his stay in the house, Watt becomes psychotic, ending up in a sort of asylum. Sam, the narrator, befriends him there, but admits the text may not approximate reality, since he can trust neither Watt’s recollection (of his stay with Knott) nor his own recollection

in Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love
Open Access (free)
John Robert Keller

becomes part of the self. This is a fluid, ongoing process, but in its most basic form during early life, it involves the manner in which the emerging, nascent self begins to take into itself experiences of others, of the world, and of external relationships. In the earliest states of mind, there is a blurring between self and other, and boundaries shift and Keller_02_ch1pm 9 23/9/02, 10:48 am 10 Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love dissolve. A major focus of this study is the earliest, most fundamental sense of contact with a good mother, which I tend to view

in Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love
Abstract only
Barry Reay
and
Nina Attwood

work banned or impossible to publish in England or America (Radclyffe Hall, Charles Henri Ford and Parker Tyler, Miller, Lawrence Durrell and Nin). In the 1950s and 1960s, Kahane’s son, the publisher Maurice Girodias, and his Olympia Press, produced avant-garde, modernist literature (Samuel Beckett, William Burroughs, J. P. Donleavy, Lawrence Durrell, Jean Genet, Miller, Vladimir Nabokov and Alexander Trocchi) as well as unadulterated porn – dirty books, or ‘dbs’. Many of the pornographers mobilised by the New York syndicate

in Dirty books
Trish McTighe
and
Kurt Taroff

work, a fact that continues to be lived out in The Beckett Laboratory at the Samuel Beckett Summer School. 6 Then Gate Director Michael Colgan's approach to audiences involved what he termed ‘Eventing’ ( 2001 : 82), an approach that packages a work so that audiences understand and experience it as an ‘Event’ and will therefore ‘tolerate’ the less traditionally dramatic aspects of Beckett's later dramas. For the festival this meant programming multiple billings of the shorter work

in Beckett’s afterlives
Paul Stewart

, he wanted to read them. The interdiction provoked its own transgression. It defined it. Enforced it’ (Pheby, 2018 : 21). Later, and only briefly, Samuel Beckett is mentioned when an unnamed narrator speculates on Lucia's reaction to finding herself in Beckett's fiction: ‘It is painful to live within the pages of a book, and/or to be recognised, for example to be a pair of eyes removed and placed on a dish. Would you like it, Samuel Beckett?’ (2018: 145). The text is alluding to the Syra-Cusa in Beckett's posthumously published Dream of Fair to

in Beckett’s afterlives
Open Access (free)
Beckett and television technologies
Jonathan Bignell

his production notes for the 1986 Was Wo (Beckett, 1985 ) and when Asmus's new What Where was first released privately, the accompanying note on the Vimeo web page read: ‘This production of What Where is faithful to Beckett's original vision regarding the brightness of the image, it is therefore quite dark and best viewed in a dark room’. The video is presented integrally with a documentary, The Remaking of Samuel Beckett's What Where , lasting about 15 minutes. It begins with video documentation of the shoot, in which Asmus is seen spotlit in a dark studio

in Beckett and media
Open Access (free)
Murphy’s misrecognition of love
John Robert Keller

built this narrative system in order to reflect his own strange experience in it and thereby gain some expression of his identity. (Levy, 1980: 25) This reading suggests the narrative-self is reflected everywhere, as in a dream or psychoanalytical session, and the ‘text’ is a manifestation of the self and its owned, and disowned, parts. In this sense, then, the narrative-self is always stepping forward. The fundamental experience Keller_03_ch2pm 49 23/9/02, 10:56 am 50 Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love that dominates the narrative-self, supplying the work

in Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love
Open Access (free)
Self-entrapment in Waiting for Godot
John Robert Keller

something absolutely required by the self (of which Vladimir and Estragon are manifestations). This is not any sort of legitimacy, which would imply a false-self compliance, but a secure internal sense of love and recognition. The characters cannot be literally nostalgic, since this primary connection is something they have not had. The ‘infinite, postmodern world’ is understandable only as a part of the totality of the human mental universe. It is the province of those Keller_05_ch4 133 23/9/02, 11:00 am 134 Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love positions of the

in Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love
Abstract only
The father’s death and the sea
Julie Campbell

Mourning Require a Subject? Samuel Beckett’s Texts for Nothing’, Boulter suggests that trauma ‘in relation to Beckett, manages to avoid [the] ghostly metaphysical haunting, [the] nostalgia for an originary subject and scene of loss’ (2004: 333) which are a central focus of discussions of trauma. He considers that Beckett’s work ‘avoids this haunting precisely because the Beckettian narrator is unable to present itself as a stable, unified (or potentially unified) subject. My interest here is to explore how trauma and mourning play out in relation to a subject without

in Samuel Beckett and trauma
Adaptation and performance in Gare St Lazare Ireland’s How It Is
Dúnlaith Bird

. ( 2011 ). The Letters of Samuel Beckett Volume II: 1941–1956 . Ed. G. Craig , M. Dow Fehsenfeld , D. Gunn and L. More Overbeck . Cambridge : Cambridge University Press . Beckett , S

in Beckett’s afterlives