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Roxana Ferllini

This article presents an account of the involvement of forensic anthropology in the investigation of human rights abuses in the modern era, and the difficulties it faces with respect to lack of adequate funding, volatile settings, the presence of unexploded ordnance, corruption in governmental agencies and a lack of good will, absence of support for NGOs and the curtailment of formal judicial proceedings to effect transitional justice. Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, Spain, Mexico and the Northern Triangle are provided as regional examples of the problems encountered when attempting to conduct forensic anthropological investigations to locate mass graves, retrieve victims and obtain proper identifications. Interventions by various organisations are highlighted to illustrate their assistance to forensic and non-forensic individuals through technical support, training and mentoring in the areas of crime-scene management and identification techniques. Interventions in mass-grave processing when state agencies have failed, the importance of DNA banks and information from family members and witnesses are also presented.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Open Access (free)
Deaths at sea and unidentified bodies in Lesbos
Iosif Kovras and Simon Robins

the destabilisation of the Middle East, massive waves of refugees and immigrants from Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran, Syria and Egypt started inundating the Aegean islands, which have become a principal entry point to the EU (see Figure 8.1). Although accurate data remains unavailable, it is estimated that in the period 2007–8 the number of arrested ‘illegal’ immigrants entering the Aegean was 29,000 (Troumpeta 2012: 21). The construction of a wall in the region of Evros in 2012 in an effort to deter border crossers entering from Turkey, coupled with the turmoil in Syria

in Migrating borders and moving times
Christian Suhr

information from. He is not himself a practising Muslim, but nevertheless he was brought up in Islam. He has never heard anything like the things I am recounting here. ‘Surely it must be a very small minority of Muslims who hold these beliefs?’ he asks. I point out that what I say here is based on my fieldwork among neo-orthodox Arab, Turkish, Iraqi, Afghan, and Somali Muslims in Aarhus. What I present is by no means representative of all Muslims. The Iranian psychiatrist suggests that he could put me in contact with some Muslim theologians with a deeper and more nuanced

in Descending with angels
Christian Suhr

the outskirts of Aarhus in August 2010. The new owner, a former leader of the so-called ‘immigrant gang’ Black Cobra, had offered the place to the group as a way to expiate for his previous sins, which had included drug dealing, gambling, and other illegal activities. The young men wanted to build a small mosque as a refuge from the demands of parents and the corrupting influences of Danish society. They were children of refugees or immigrants who moved to Denmark from Iraq, Lebanon, Afghanistan, Somalia, and Turkey. Some participants in

in Descending with angels
Mass graves in post-war Malaysia
Frances Tay

-loving nation’, Deputy Minister Datuk Donald Lim was quoted as saying, ‘and the idea behind this memorial is more of an anti-war stance, which is fitting, considering that at this juncture there are wars going on around the world, like Afghanistan for instance.’30 In the mainstream press, the event was reported as a nostalgic reunion of former resistance fighters. In the alternative media, the opportunity was taken to remind the public that MPAJA fighters, who had sacrificed for the nation, had once been hunted as communist terrorists and bandits. Readers were also reminded

in Human remains and identification
From Ottoman railway lines to contemporary migrant transportation
Rozita Dimova

wave of 2015–16, when over 300,000 people crossed the country, many on foot but many using trains through the Balkan corridor on their way to Serbia and further, to Western Europe. The public became aware of the Balkan corridor on 6 November 2014 when, in broad daylight at around 2 p.m. near the town of Veles in central RN Macedonia, a father and a seven-month-old baby from Afghanistan were run over by the express train traveling from Thessaloniki to Belgrade. This was the first incident, marking a trend that would claim many more lives in the

in Border porosities
Abstract only
Stewart Allen

profile as their domestic intake of trainees waned and they began focusing on the training of individuals from outside India. From 2005 to 2006, thirty-four individuals, a mix of men and women, arrived from Ethiopia, Sierra Leone and Afghanistan, all funded by Norwegian Church Aid (NCA). Numbers continued to rise year on year, with thirty-six trainees from Bhutan arriving in 2007, funded jointly by the Bhutanese government and the Asian Development Bank, and approximately the same number from Cameroon, Mali, Bolivia, the Gambia and Afghanistan, who were funded by

in An ethnography of NGO practice in India
Challenges and technological solutions to the ­identification of individuals in mass grave scenarios in the modern context
Gillian Fowler and Tim Thompson

of the remains correlates with the probability of positive identification.18 Very short time periods can also be challenging, since the conflict that caused the mass grave may still be ongoing, thus making it difficult or dangerous to access the graves (as is the case in Afghanistan). A key problem associated with multiple individuals in a single grave is commingling. This is a process where body parts from one person become associated with another. This can lead to problems when trying to determine the minimum number of individuals in a grave context and when

in Human remains and identification
Open Access (free)
The politics of exhumation in post-genocide Rwanda
Rémi Korman

necessarily embryonic. Nevertheless, what comes across very clearly is that several organizations working in the field of forensic anthropology, including INFORCE, have developed close links with certain political and military institutions. The debates surrounding ‘embedded anthropology’ have become particularly important following the wars in Afghanistan and then Iraq in the context of the ‘Human Terrain System’, which saw the incorporation of anthropologists and other researchers in the social sciences within the armed forces, with a view to gaining a better understanding

in Human remains and identification
Abstract only
Stewart Allen

-centred approach to solar power promoted by the College. Relationships and links were established with international NGOs, a process amplified and made easier through the then novel, yet growing, use of Internet-based communication networks. The College eventually became host to participants from partner NGOs, acting as a demonstration project itself in sustainable, community led development, providing training and know-how to individuals from Afghanistan, Costa Rica, Uruguay, Tanzania and Kenya, to name just a few. This informal, trial-and-error, understanding

in An ethnography of NGO practice in India