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Overview of conflict and assistance from 2001 to 2014
Eric James and Tim Jacoby

between organizational structure and individual agency, humanitarian ethics and the link between security and development. In Chapter 4 , attention shifted to the case study, examining the history of Afghanistan by deploying the three drivers of the military–humanitarian relationship first discussed in Chapter 2 . The purpose of this chapter is to describe the situation in

in The military-humanitarian complex in Afghanistan
Eric James and Tim Jacoby

principles were important to most organizations working in Afghanistan but they were heavily influenced by the politically charged environment. Finally, humanitarians understood that they are part of the stability and state-building process in Afghanistan and, for that reason, those issues relating to co-option and politicization are less significant than is commonly assumed

in The military-humanitarian complex in Afghanistan
Authors: Eric James and Tim Jacoby

Over recent years, the relationship between humanitarians and the military has become especially controversial. Concerns over inefficient and duplicated assistance programs and the compromised security of relief workers have been regularly highlighted. Many point to ongoing tensions and polarized positions that seem to leave NGOs a stark choice between “neutrality” and co-option. Using Afghanistan as a case study, this book analyses this apparent duality. It puts forward five basic arguments. First, the history of the relationship extends prior to the birth of modern humanitarianism. Second, inter-organizational friction is common between groups and it does not always have a detrimental impact. Third, working with the military does not necessarily create more dangerous situations for NGOs. Fourth, humanitarian principles are not a fixed set of propositions, but evolve according to temporal and situational context. Finally, humanitarians are generally not co-opted, but rather willingly take part in political-military endeavors. In all, it is suggested that NGOs tend to change their policies and actions depending on the context. The book thus transcends the simple “for” or “against” arguments, leading to a more refined understanding of the relationship between NGOs and the military.

Eric James and Tim Jacoby

Introduction Afghanistan’s experiences with war and resistance, development and crisis, ideology and big-power politics have had powerful influences and serve as a backdrop to the military–humanitarian relationship. The country’s history has been well covered elsewhere and the features of it political history are summarized in Table 4

in The military-humanitarian complex in Afghanistan
Roxana Ferllini

This article presents an account of the involvement of forensic anthropology in the investigation of human rights abuses in the modern era, and the difficulties it faces with respect to lack of adequate funding, volatile settings, the presence of unexploded ordnance, corruption in governmental agencies and a lack of good will, absence of support for NGOs and the curtailment of formal judicial proceedings to effect transitional justice. Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, Spain, Mexico and the Northern Triangle are provided as regional examples of the problems encountered when attempting to conduct forensic anthropological investigations to locate mass graves, retrieve victims and obtain proper identifications. Interventions by various organisations are highlighted to illustrate their assistance to forensic and non-forensic individuals through technical support, training and mentoring in the areas of crime-scene management and identification techniques. Interventions in mass-grave processing when state agencies have failed, the importance of DNA banks and information from family members and witnesses are also presented.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Colonial cultures of sport and diplomacy in Afghanistan, 1919–49
Maximilian Drephal

Colonial cultures of sport and diplomacy in Afghanistan 89 5 Contesting independence: colonial cultures of sport and diplomacy in Afghanistan, 1919–49 Maximilian Drephal Introduction: Afghanistan’s independence celebrations Afghanistan became independent in 1919, and the Afghan state commemorated the moment of statal independence and the making of an Afghan nation during weeklong celebrations in each following year, staging military parades, organising cultural programmes and hosting sports competitions. Amir Amanullah Khan established the festivities

in Sport and diplomacy
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Eric James and Tim Jacoby

Humanitarianism and war in Afghanistan On 4 June 2004, five staff members of the international NGO, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), were murdered in northwest Afghanistan. Within a month, the organization had withdrawn after more than two decades of providing assistance to the country. According to a senior MSF

in The military-humanitarian complex in Afghanistan
Memory and security without visibility
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

terrorism on Afghan soil. These ‘horse soldiers’ of the War on Terror have now been immortalised in bronze. Paid for by Wall Street firms whose employees lost friends in the 9/11 attacks, as well as right-leaning celebrity activists and a movie producer, the statue stands at the entrance to the PATH station at the WTC site. The statue was intended to reify the glory of the US military but, I will suggest

in Death and security
The 1980 Moscow boycott through contemporary Asian–African perspectives
Joseph Eaton

The 1980 Moscow boycott 203 11 Decentring US sports diplomacy: the 1980 Moscow boycott through contemporary Asian–African perspectives* Joseph Eaton The boycott of the 1980 Moscow Olympics is commonly described as having been a fiasco. The titles of books on the boycott tell of President Jimmy Carter’s failed response to the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan – Dropping the Torch: Jimmy Carter, the Olympic Boycott, and the Cold War by Nicholas Evan Sarantakes (2010) – and the unfair treatment given athletes, denied their chance to compete at Moscow – Boycott

in Sport and diplomacy
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Masculinities, ‘philanthrocapitalism’ and the military-industrial complex
Laura Clancy

After his second tour of duty serving with the Army Air Corps in Afghanistan in late 2012 as part of the ‘War on Terror’, in March 2014 Prince Harry launched the Invictus Games: an annual, international, multi-sport event featuring wounded armed services veterans. Pitched as demonstrating ‘the power of sport to inspire recovery, support rehabilitation and demonstrate life beyond disability’, the Invictus Games (hereafter Invictus) promote competitive spirit to deal with the physical and mental injuries of contemporary warfare

in Running the Family Firm