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Guy Austin

It has become a commonplace that ‘Algerian cinema was born out of the war of independence and served that war’ (Salmane 1976 : 5). Film in Algeria also preserved the memory of that war, legitimising the FLN regime after independence by mythologising the liberation struggle. State-controlled culture played an important role in the formation of a national imaginary after 1962, thus fulfilling

in Algerian national cinema
Guy Austin

Being Algerian has been described as ‘the most complicated history of citizenship in the world’ (Khanna 2008 : 70). Algeria combines an ancient Berber culture with the historical influence of diverse invasions and colonial occupations (Carthaginian, Roman, Vandal, Arab, Byzantine, Egyptian, Spanish, Ottoman and French). For Pierre Bourdieu, the French sociologist who worked on Algeria throughout his career, this complex

in Algerian national cinema
Author: Guy Austin

In terms of the so-called 'clash of civilisations' after '9/11', Islamic states such as Algeria have too often been perceived in the West as 'other' and hence as threatening. This book, via an analysis of cinema, provides a discussion on some misunderstandings and assumptions about Algeria, which remains to a large extent underrepresented or misrepresented in the UK media. It is about Algerian national cinema and illuminates the ways in which the official mythologising of a national culture at the 'centre' of the postcolonial state has marginalised the diverse identities within the nation. Tahia ya didou occupies a pivotal position between fiction and documentary, capturing the hectic modernization of the Boumediene era while reflecting back on the aftermath of historical trauma. La Citadelle presents gender differences as culturally engrained and patriarchal power as secure. Youcef, Bab El-Oued City and Rome plutôt que vous present differing visions of how a Freudian melancholia in the shadow of a crushed revolt might relate to Algerian experience after Black October. Lettre à ma soeur listens to the voices of the subaltern; the film is a sense of re-emergence that follows the initial insurgency of Nabila's activism, the trauma of her killing and the subsequent years of silence and self-imposed incarceration.

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Algerian national cinemas
Guy Austin

Currently, Algerian cinema is starting to reconfigure itself after two decades of attrition and collapse. The nationalised film industry of the Boumediene era is long gone, but there are signs that a national film industry might be under (re)construction. Those signs are small-scale. It was taken as significant that the comedy Mascarades (Salem, 2007) was released on as many as eleven screens

in Algerian national cinema
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Representing people of Algerian heritage
Joseph McGonagle

Representing people of ­Algerian heritage 2 Shaping spaces: representing people of ­Algerian heritage French colonial and postcolonial relations with the countries of the Maghreb have been long and troubled. Post-1945, significant numbers of Moroccans, Tunisians and Algerians migrated to France and eventually settled there definitively: they and their families now constitute a significant proportion of France’s ethnic minority population. Aside from being numerically the greatest, arguably the symbolically most important and prominent component of this

in Representing ethnicity in contemporary French visual culture
From Le Thé à la menthe to La Fille de Keltoum
Carrie Tarr

The beur and banlieue films discussed in previous chapters have been the work of either beur or white French filmmakers. However, the book would not be complete without a consideration of how difference has been reframed by Algerian filmmakers working in France. 2 The transnational status of such filmmakers makes their work particularly difficult to categorise. The 2003 film season ‘Hommage aux cinéastes algériens’, held at the

in Reframing difference
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From lost sites to reclaimed images
Guy Austin

Case studies: Viva Laldjérie (Nadir Mokneche, 2004), Délice Paloma (Nadir Mokneche, 2007), La Maison jaune (Amor Hakkar, 2007) A loss of identity and a sense of dispossession are two related and painful threads that run through modern Algerian history. They can be

in Algerian national cinema

The issue of ethnicity in France, and how ethnicities are represented there visually, remains one of the most important and polemical aspects of French post-colonial politics and society. This is the first book to analyse how a range of different ethnicities have been represented across contemporary French visual culture. Via a wide series of case studies – from the worldwide hit film Amélie to France’s popular TV series Plus belle la vie – it probes how ethnicities have been represented across different media, including film, photography, television and the visual arts. Four chapters examine distinct areas of particular importance: national identity, people of Algerian heritage, Jewishness and France’s second city Marseille.

Mourning and melancholia
Guy Austin

Case studies: Youcef (Mohamed Chouikh, 1993), Bab El-Oued City (Merzak Allouache, 1994), Rome plutôt que vous (Tariq Teguia, 2006). The events of October 1988 form a watershed in recent Algerian history. Known as Black October, this was the moment when popular trust in the state, eroded for years

in Algerian national cinema
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Tradition and taboo
Guy Austin

Case studies: Omar Gatlato (Merzak Allouache, 1976), La Nouba des femmes du Mont Chenoua (Assia Djebar, 1978), La Citadelle (Mohamed Chouikh, 1988) Gender is one of the most vexed questions in modern Algeria and has been approached in diverse films of different genres

in Algerian national cinema