Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 168 items for :

  • Manchester Political Studies x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Approaching the Other
François Burgat

In September 1973, after this “round-the-world trip,” I moved to Algeria. Since my PhD also involved teaching at the Law faculty of the University of Constantine, this also meant leaving strictly student life behind. It is at this stage that I took up a less impressionistic, more professional, and more systematic approach to knowledge. Algeria—which had, via cousins from there, filled my adolescent imagination—was no longer quite unknown to me. It had not been a part of my “small” tour of the Mediterranean. But

in Understanding Political Islam
The international connection
Francesco Cavatorta

3 Explaining Algeria’s transition: the international connection This chapter has three main objectives. First of all it aims to construct a framework of transitions that includes international variables, using theoretical assumptions drawn from international relations theories. Such framework can also help understand the subsequent role that the country under examination will play in the international system. The second objective is to specify the components of this framework. In particular, it will focus on detailing the two fundamental dimensions briefly

in The international dimension of the failed Algerian transition
Democracy betrayed?

This book builds a theoretical framework through which previously neglected international factors are brought into the analyses of transitions to democracy. It then explores the case of Algeria. It contributes to the literature on democratisation and provides an analysis of Algerian politics during the last two decades. More specifically, it examines how international variables influence the behaviour and activities of Algerian political actors. By bridging the comparative politics and international relations literature, the book offers a new understanding of the initiation, development and outcome of transitions to democracy. International factors, far from being marginal and secondary, are treated as central explanatory variables. Such external factors were crucial in the failed Algerian transition to democracy, when the attitudes and actions of key international actors shaped the domestic game and its final outcome. In particular, the book looks at the controversial role of the Islamic Salvation Front and how its part was perceived abroad. In addition, it argues that international factors significantly contribute to explaining the persistence of authoritarian rule in Algeria, to its integration into the global economy and its co-optation into the war on terror.

George Joffé

Introduction The independent Algerian state was born through extreme violence and, during its more than five decades of independent existence, has experienced repeated episodes of violent political convulsion. Indeed, since 1980, violence has been the leitmotif of Algeria's political evolution and, since the mid-1980s, this has often taken the form of non-state terrorist extremism, 1 particularly during the 1990s when the country was plunged into civil war. Since the civil war ended at the start of the twenty-first century, the country has

in Non-Western responses to terrorism
Francesco Cavatorta

4 The external context of the Algerian transition Before analysing whether the hypotheses outlined in Chapter 3 are confirmed by the evidence gathered, it is necessary to describe in greater detail the external environment with which Algeria had to contend before, during and after its problematic transition. The external environment Huntington’s study (1991: 45) of why so many countries democratised or attempted to do so at a particular moment sees ‘the unprecedented global economic growth of the 1960s’ as central. In Algeria however, the timing of the process

in The international dimension of the failed Algerian transition
The integration of authoritarian Algeria in the international system
Francesco Cavatorta

7 From partners to allies: the integration of authoritarian Algeria in the international system The research findings support the contention that the international dimension played a significant role in the origin, development and conclusion of the failed Algerian transition. In particular, a set of coinciding interests between key domestic and international constituencies was decisive in ending an electoral process that would have seen the establishment of a FIS-led government. The process of democratisation might have ended even if the FIS had been allowed to

in The international dimension of the failed Algerian transition
Abstract only
Algeria’s failed process of democratisation
Francesco Cavatorta

1 Introduction: Algeria’s failed process of democratisation Algeria’s failed transition In October 1988 Algeria experienced a seemingly sudden explosion of street violence triggered by economic and social discontent. People protested against the economic reforms the government had introduced and for a few days chaos reigned in the country. These riots were to be a turning point because they provided the opportunity for President Chadli and for the soft-liners within the regime to introduce significant political reforms resulting in an attempt to turn the country

in The international dimension of the failed Algerian transition
International perceptions
Francesco Cavatorta

6 Islamism and democracy: international perceptions The international dimension of the failed Algerian process of democratisation is an important part of the story because it not only contributes to explain such failure, but also because it indirectly addresses very important contemporary issues about the prospects of democracy in the Arab world. From the previous analysis, it emerges that it is around the emergence of the FIS as the largest opposition movement in Algeria that the whole transition turned. It is largely the rise of the Islamist movement that

in The international dimension of the failed Algerian transition
Gerasimos Gerasimos

emigration and the economic urge to embrace it. The chapter aims to unpack this dimension of Middle East states’ migration diplomacy further by shedding additional light on the state–diaspora relations as they have developed across North Africa. The examples of Algeria, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia, and Egypt demonstrate how states are torn between ‘controlling’ and ‘courting’ their diasporas residing in Europe and North America. Regime security considerations have led the first four states to develop intricate control mechanisms that aim to prevent political activism abroad

in Migration diplomacy in the Middle East and North Africa
Francesco Cavatorta

asked is the following: did the externally driven downturn in the economy have a causal link to the decision to liberalise? In order to answer this question, it is necessary to take into account a number of elements. First of all, prior to the crisis in the mid-1980s, Algerian society had known a substantial degree of stability. Over the course of the decades, there were only two episodes that seemed to shake the regime. The first was the Berber Spring of 1980, which was dealt with quite swiftly, and a radical Islamist insurrection in 1983, similarly dealt with. The

in The international dimension of the failed Algerian transition