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The veil in me
Nicholas Royle

Another cut, still a cut, cut again: Encore une coupure . This phrase appears towards the close of Reveries of the Wild Woman: Primal Scenes (2000). 1 It epitomises a book that practises a more or less continuous art of epitome. (‘Epitome’ is from the ancient Greek ἐπιτέμνειν , ‘to make an incision into’, ‘to abridge’.) 2 Encore une coupure : it is a book of memories of childhood in Algeria cut, ‘up to the present’ (48), with images and figures of ‘amputation’, variously physical, emotional, conceptual and linguistic. I compute , therefore I am

in Hélène Cixous

Ralph Knevet's Supplement of the Faery Queene (1635) is a narrative and allegorical work, which weaves together a complex collection of tales and episodes, featuring knights, ladies, sorcerers, monsters, vertiginous fortresses and deadly battles – a chivalric romp in Spenser's cod medieval style. The poem shadows recent English history, and the major military and political events of the Thirty Years War. But the Supplement is also an ambitiously intertextual poem, weaving together materials from mythic, literary, historical, scientific, theological, and many other kinds of written sources. Its encyclopaedic ambitions combine with Knevet's historical focus to produce an allegorical epic poem of considerable interest and power.

This new edition of Knevet's Supplement, the first scholarly text of the poem ever published, situates it in its literary, historical, biographical, and intellectual contexts. An extensive introduction and copious critical commentary, positioned at the back of the book, will enable students and scholars alike to access Knevet's complicated and enigmatic meanings, structures, and allusions.

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Regime change in Macbeth
Richard Wilson

Elizabeth, Shakespeare wrote in Henry VIII , would be inherited by King James along with Plenty and Peace [ 5,4,4 ]. For terror was ‘a particular figure of state power’, Alain Badiou points out, until the term ‘terrorist’ was first applied by the state to anti-Nazi resisters, then the Algerian NLF, and so to Palestinian fighters, to signify the opposite. 109 Macbeth is a drama which questions this

in Free Will
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Christopher Burlinson and Andrew Zurcher

This chapter contains extensive critical commentary of A Supplement of the Faery Queene, exploring Knevet's complicated and enigmatic meanings, structures and allusions.

in A Supplement of the Faery Queene
Nicholas Royle

, starting perhaps with this figure of interruption or ruptive force and how it relates to Derrida’s proposition (made more than twenty years earlier): ‘Telepathy is the interruption of the psychoanalysis of psychoanalysis.’ 33 Writing marks waking from the start, interrupting the aposiopesis of reveries that opens Reveries of the Wild Woman : ‘The whole time I was living in Algeria I would dream of one day arriving in Algeria, I would have done anything to get there, I had written, I never made it to Algeria, it is right now that I must explain what I mean by

in Hélène Cixous
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Nicholas Royle

attack or counter-attack, a peculiar outburst, Cixous’s writing is off, it’s away Writing in ‘Sorties’ (1975) about Algeria, about her childhood and how she comes to writing, now in the away-present of writing, she evokes an imagined ‘elsewhere’: everyone knows that to go somewhere else there are routes, signs, ‘maps’ – for an exploration, a trip. – That’s what books are. Everyone knows that a place exists which is not economically or politically indebted to all the vileness and compromise. That is not obliged to reproduce the system. That is writing

in Hélène Cixous
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Lewis Carroll
Nicholas Royle

, in response to all the deathly horrors of nationalism and colonialism (across Europe and into Algeria), all the vileness of anti-semitism and ‘the odour of misogyny’ she encountered in her early years. 15 ‘Literary nationality’ is free to all. It has no borders. It breaks with all forms of nationalism while also reminding us that the word ‘nation’ comes from the Latin nāscī , to be born. ‘Literary nationality’ is about being born and giving birth. It affirms literary birth, writing and creation. The allegedly dead come back, in the black milk of dreams – and in

in Hélène Cixous
Nicholas Royle

Algeria. Gradually it becomes evident, however, that the title-phrase is in fact ‘first’ to be heard in the voice of the mother’s mother. It is the narrator’s mother who wasn’t there the day the infant died: ‘This child, when did he go? The only day I leave the house. For one year I don’t go out. One day , I go out. And he goes. Without me. The day I am not there ’ (51). But of course the sound and vision of this title-phrase haunts everything and everyone in the text, including the chickens, as we have seen, and above all the narrator. At the beginning

in Hélène Cixous
Gender and conversion in the early modern Mediterranean
Eric Dursteler

. 1363–4; Salvatore Bono, ‘Pascià e Raìs algerini di origine italiana’, in R. H. Raniero (ed.), Algeria e Italia (Milan: Marzorati, 1982 ), pp. 200–1. 19 Anthony Nixon, The three English brothers (London, 1607

in Conversions
Proust
Jeremy Tambling

ville où il vivait Carpaccio fit une Jérusalem ou une Constantinople. (T.4.342)] In this context, he sees two Zouaves walking (members of a French colonial regiment – originally Algerian – who wore Oriental uniforms). They are followed by Charlus. It seems that the unconscious imagination of the narrator that they are in the Orient is shared

in On anachronism