Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 75 items for :

  • Literature and Theatre x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
James Baldwin on My Shoulder, Part Two
Karen Thorsen

Filmmaker Karen Thorsen gave us James Baldwin: The Price of the Ticket, the award-winning documentary that is now considered a classic. First broadcast on PBS/American Masters in August, 1989—just days after what would have been Baldwin’s sixty-fifth birthday—the film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 1990. It was not the film Thorsen intended to make. Beginning in 1986, Baldwin and Thorsen had been collaborating on a very different film project: a “nonfiction feature” about the history, research, and writing of Baldwin’s next book, “Remember This House.” It was also going to be a film about progress: about how far we had come, how far we still have to go, before we learn to trust our common humanity. But that project ended abruptly. On 1 December 1987, James Baldwin died—and “Remember This House,” book and film died with him. Suddenly, Thorsen’s mission changed: the world needed to know what they had lost. Her alliance with Baldwin took on new meaning. The following memoir—the second of two serialized parts—explores how and why their collaboration began. The first installment appeared in the sixth volume of James Baldwin Review, in the fall of 2020; the next stage of their journey starts here.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
An Excerpt from Bill V. Mullen’s New Biography, James Baldwin: Living in Fire, and an Interview with the Author
Bill V. Mullen

This excerpt from James Baldwin: Living in Fire details a key juncture in Baldwin’s life, 1957–59, when he was transformed by a visit to the South to write about the civil rights movement while grappling with the meaning of the Algerian Revolution. The excerpt shows Baldwin understanding black and Arab liberation struggles as simultaneous and parallel moments in the rise of Third World, anti-colonial and anti-racist U.S. politics. It also shows Baldwin’s emotional and psychological vulnerability to repressive state violence experienced by black and Arab citizens in the U.S., France, and Algiers.

James Baldwin Review
Madness and colonization
Azzedine Haddour

’s assimilationist policies, policies which impacted negatively on Algerian society, on its economy and its mental health. As we shall see in Chapter 5, not only did they lead to the expropriation, marginalization and acculturation of the Algerian people, they also precipitated the breakdown of their social structures and culminated in the emergence of a lumpenproletariat. Arguably, madness and what Fanon dubs the ‘North African syndrome’ were nothing but manifestations of colonial assimilation and the attendant violence to which it gave rise as it brought about the pulverization

in Frantz Fanon, postcolonialism and the ethics of difference
The battle of The Screens
Carl Lavery

, Blin’s production, although intentionally constructed as the antithesis of orthodox models of committed theatre, marked an important political turning point in French history. 1 In my reading, the riots provoked by the play’s treatment of the Algerian War called the Gaullist consensus on Algeria into question, and helped to prepare the ground for May 1968. In this way, I intend to provide empirical evidence for what I have been until now merely arguing for: that Genet’s desire to wound his audience possessed real revolutionary potential. The battle of The

in The politics of Jean Genet’s late theatre
Bryan Cheyette

74 Frantz Fanon’s Black Skin, White Masks 4 Frantz Fanon and the Black-Jewish imaginary1 BRYAN CHEYETTE In his posthumously published essays on the Algerian revolution, L’An V de la révolution algérienne (1959), Frantz Fanon characterises Algerian Jewry, which made up ‘le cinquième de la population non musulmane d’Algérie‘ (‘one-fifth of the nonMoslem population of Algeria’) (Fanon 2001: 142; Fanon 1989: 153), as containing three distinct strands. First, ‘les commerçants juifs’ (‘Jewish tradesmen’) who are mainly invested in French rule and therefore do not

in Frantz Fanon’s 'Black Skin, White Masks
Shérazade and other women in the work of Leïla Sebbar
Margaret A. Majumdar

  .   The subversion of the gaze: Shérazade and other women in the work of Leïla Sebbar Of mixed Franco-Algerian parentage, Leïla Sebbar spans a variety of genres in her writing,including short stories,journalism,essays,children’s writing and contributions to collaborative works, including collections of visual material. She also has a number of major novels to her credit. In its thematic content, Sebbar’s work straddles the Mediterranean, focusing attention on the dynamics between the generations. She is not engaged in any mission of

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Abstract only
The veil in me
Nicholas Royle

Another cut, still a cut, cut again: Encore une coupure . This phrase appears towards the close of Reveries of the Wild Woman: Primal Scenes (2000). 1 It epitomises a book that practises a more or less continuous art of epitome. (‘Epitome’ is from the ancient Greek ἐπιτέμνειν , ‘to make an incision into’, ‘to abridge’.) 2 Encore une coupure : it is a book of memories of childhood in Algeria cut, ‘up to the present’ (48), with images and figures of ‘amputation’, variously physical, emotional, conceptual and linguistic. I compute , therefore I am

in Hélène Cixous
David Macey

factors and agencies. There is of course a degree of indeterminacy about the text itself; Fanon’s insistence that he 14 Frantz Fanon’s Black Skin, White Masks is speaking of Martinique or the West Indies is somewhat discordant with more generalised statements about a universal experience,4 just as it is never quite certain whether Les Damnés de la terre is ‘about’ Algeria or the more universal Third World – ‘en face de l’Europe comme une masse colossale’ (‘facing Europe like a colossal mass’) (Fanon 1961: 241) – it did so much to bring into being. After his death

in Frantz Fanon’s 'Black Skin, White Masks
Abstract only
Azzedine Haddour

centre of Memmi’s critique is Fanon’s rejection of both French culture and negritude, and his espousal of revolutionary praxis in colonial Algeria and Africa. ‘In his short life,’ Memmi writes, ‘Frantz Fanon experienced at least three serious failures.’2 The first consists in his disavowal of his West Indian identity and in his identification with the colonizer’s cultural models, which were French and white. The second was the outcome of his disillusionment with these models; his encounter with racism in mainland France ultimately led him to renounce his Frenchness

in Frantz Fanon, postcolonialism and the ethics of difference
The anthem of decolonization?
Azzedine Haddour

psychological constitution. Fanon also critiques Marxism. In The Wretched of the Earth, he claims that Marxism failed to take into consideration colonial politics. He is emphatic that ‘Marxist analysis should always be stretched every time we have to do with the colonial problem’.1 However, as we will see in this chapter, he overstates his case when he argues that Marx’s study of pre-capitalist society must be completely rethought: Marx’s analysis of the political ramifications of these laws on Algerian society prefigured Sartre’s analysis of the development of colonial

in Frantz Fanon, postcolonialism and the ethics of difference