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Abstract only
Edward Ashbee

structure and direction of the minority vote. It appears that there was a slight fall in the proportion of African-American voters (the constituency that gives the highest levels of backing to Democratic candidates) and, as a corollary, a slight increase in the proportions of Hispanic and Asian-American voters. More importantly, while some of the figures have been fiercely contested, and although Hillary Clinton still won very large majorities amongst the minority electorate, the exit polls suggest some significant swings to the Republicans among minorities when set

in The Trump revolt
Abstract only
Edward Ashbee

. As a Brookings Institution report noted, productivity advances since the early 1980s dramatically reduced the manufacturing sector's capacity to create large-scale employment (Muro and Liu, 2016 ). 8 It has been argued the paleo-conservative focus upon an American identity structured around those descended from white Europeans was not only an assault upon Hispanics, African-Americans and Asian-Americans but was also anti-Semitic. Certainly, paleo references to the ‘Jewish lobby’ seemed to support these claims. 9 Paleo-conservative suspicions of Britain can

in The Trump revolt
Elections
Edward Ashbee

, 89 per cent of African-Americans, 66 per cent of Latinx, and 65 per cent of Asian-Americans voted for Clinton. In contrast, 57 per cent of white voters supported Trump. If gender is factored in, 62 per cent of white men were Trump voters. If education is brought in, 66 per cent of white voters without a college degree voted for Trump. And 71 per cent of white men without a college degree were behind Trump (CNN, 2016 ). Why is there such a striking racial and ethnic divide? Part of the answer lies in income

in US politics today (fourth edition)
Abstract only
“The Father of Pan-Africanism”?
Aldon D. Morris

the relations of social classes to the means of production. His compatriot, Max Weber, on the other hand, argued that capitalism grew out of a rationalism peculiar to the West that was anchored in the Protestant work ethic. As Asian-American scholar Julian Go argued in 2016, these explanations share fundamental claims. Both argued that the causes of capitalism lay exclusively in Western Europe. In this view, people of colour across the world had played no role in producing capitalism, but had only reacted to its global reshaping of human societies. Both perspectives

in The Pan-African Pantheon