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Abstract only
Philip Hammond

; and bombing the Bosnian Serbs. While it will not be possible to examine coverage of all of these interventions, the main concern of this study is international involvement in the Bosnian war. Context Recognition of Bosnian independence in 1992 followed the secession of the republics of Croatia and Slovenia from the federal Yugoslav state the previous year. While the separation

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
Abstract only
Philip Hammond

Yugoslav government and ethnic-Albanian separatists had failed, is true in the sense that there were numerous diplomatic initiatives prior to the onset of bombing. The status of Kosovo had been raised as an international issue at the time of the Bosnian war, but Western interest in Kosovo greatly increased from late 1997. Over the course of 1998 the US and European governments, Nato, the Contact Group (established in

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
Ana E. Juncos

over foreign policy issues. The EC and the EPC systems remained formally apart as the member states tried to avoid the contamination of EPC with the EC’s procedures and rules (see Chapter 2 ). The Bosnian War, more than any other event, showed not just the institutional limitations of EPC, but also the difficulties of a multinational organisation agreeing and implementing a common policy. Overall, the

in EU Foreign and Security Policy in Bosnia
Abstract only
Ana E. Juncos

(in particular, the EEAS) reach their full potential and begin to meet current expectations. The impact of CFSP institutionalisation on coherence and effectiveness Some general conclusions can be drawn concerning CFSP activities in Bosnia and the impact of institutionalisation. In the early stages of the EU’s involvement in the Bosnian War, coherence was negatively affected by

in EU Foreign and Security Policy in Bosnia
Abstract only
Ana E. Juncos

September. Carrington Peace Plan rejected by Serbia. March 1992: Bosnia’s referendum on independence. The country declares its independence on 3 March. April 1992: EC member states recognise Bosnia. Bosnian War starts. January 1993: Vance–Owen Peace Plan. July 1993: Owen–Stoltenberg Peace Plan

in EU Foreign and Security Policy in Bosnia
Ana E. Juncos

leaders (Busek, 2004 : 1). The events in Kosovo meant that the EU had failed once more to prevent a war in the Balkans. Once again it was confronted by a humanitarian and refugee crisis in its neighbourhood and, as experienced during the Bosnian War, the US had taken the leadership in the military and political arena. As a result of this state of affairs, and immediately after the beginning of the NATO

in EU Foreign and Security Policy in Bosnia
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Europeanisation in the making
Boyka Stefanova

‘managed enlargement’. Serbia opened talks for the signing of a Stabilisation and Association Agreement in 2005 under the condition that suspected criminals from the Bosnian war, including General Ratko Mladic, would be extradited for trial at the ICTY by the end of March 2006. The EU separated the monitoring of Kosovo under the European Partnership and reassured Serbia that its

in The Europeanisation of conflict resolution
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Humanity and relief in war and peace
Rebecca Gill

of a ‘humanitarian crisis’ in the Bosnian War obscured the failure of European states to intervene and kept attention focused on numbers of victims rather than numbers of murderers. 45 Elsewhere, pressing human need, particularly if it is a less ready exemplar of political or ideological imperatives – or is experienced by those not deemed full members of humanity, or as

in Calculating compassion
Kosovo prior to 1999
Naomi Head

table and the subsequent recognition by the EU of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia which included Kosovo. 76 As Peter Russell argues, the strategic exclusion of Kosovo did not result from lack of knowledge about the conditions in the province, but was the result of a ‘deliberate decision on the part of Richard Holbrooke and his team that the severity of the Bosnian war

in Justifying violence
Debating Kosovo
Naomi Head

’s prior involvement in the Balkans. Although it was the desire to avoid a repetition of the Bosnian war which served to motivate and justify military intervention in Kosovo, there is little explicit reference to or reflexivity concerning earlier refusals to address the problems in Kosovo. In other words, the missed opportunities for dialogue identified in the 1990s do not guide the communicative

in Justifying violence