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Religion, class and multiculturalism
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This book aims to bring together a materialist, class-based analysis with a recognition of the role of cultural, including religious, difference in stratifying society and marginalising certain - especially Muslim - members of society. It explores the relationship between class and minority religious identity while advocating a positive recognition of cultural and religious difference in the public sphere as a means of working against its unevenness and challenging this stratification, marginalisation and stigmatisation. By combining a materialist approach with a recognition of the significance of religious faith, the book also sutures the political and the religious, the public and the private. The book seeks to reframe the literary controversies involving Britain's Muslim minority. Focusing on the 1988-89 Satanic Verses controversy and the dispute surrounding Monica Ali's 2003 novel Brick Lane and its filming in 2006, as well as on protests by Muslims against H. G. Wells's A Short History of the World in 1930s Britain, Writing British Muslims grounds these outbreaks of religious minority offence in their local material conditions. By highlighting the unequal access to spatial, economic and cultural capital that shaped them, it complicates the normative representations of such disputes in terms of creative freedom and religious censure and censorship.

Rethinking integration
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This book is the first comprehensive study of Muslim migrant integration in rural Britain across the post-1960s period. It uses the county of Wiltshire as a case study, and assesses both local authority policies and strategies, and Muslim communities’ personal experiences of migration and integration. It draws upon previously unexplored archival material and oral histories, and addresses a range of topics and themes, including entrepreneurship, housing, education, multiculturalism, social cohesion, and religious identities, needs and practices. It challenges the long-held assumption that local authorities in more rural areas have been inactive, and even disinterested, in devising and implementing migration, integration and diversity policies, and it sheds light on small and dispersed Muslim communities that have traditionally been written out of Britain’s immigration history. It reveals what is a clear, and often complex, relationship between rurality and integration, and shows how both local authority policies and Muslim migrants’ experiences have long been rooted in, and shaped by, their rural settings and the prevalence of small ethnic minority communities and Muslim populations in particular. The study’s findings and conclusions build upon research on migration and integration at the rural level, as well as local-level migrant policies, experiences and integration, and uncover what has long been a rural dimension to Muslim integration in Britain.

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Mass vaccination and the public since the Second World War
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Vaccinating Britain investigates the relationship between the British public and vaccination policy since 1945. It is the first book to examine British vaccination policy across the post-war period and covers a range of vaccines, providing valuable context and insight for those interested in historical or present-day public health policy debates. Drawing on government documents, newspapers, internet archives and medical texts it shows how the modern vaccination system became established and how the public played a key role in its formation. British parents came to accept vaccination as a safe, effective and cost-efficient preventative measure. But occasional crises showed that faith in the system was tied to contemporary concerns about the medical profession, the power of the state and attitudes to individual vaccines. Thus, at times the British public demanded more comprehensive vaccination coverage from the welfare state; at others they eschewed specific vaccines that they thought were dangerous or unnecessary. Moreover, they did not always act uniformly, with “the public” capable of expressing contradictory demands that were often at odds with official policy. This case study of Britain’s vaccination system provides insight into the relationship between the British public and the welfare state, as well as contributing to the historiography of public health and medicine.

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How a decade of conflict remade the nation
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When Britain left the European Union in January 2021, it set out on a new journey. Shorn of empire and now the EU too, Britain’s economy is as national as it has ever been. A decade or so since globalisation seemed inevitable, this is a remarkable reversal. How did this happen?

Britain alone argues that this ‘nationalisation’ – aligning the boundaries of the state with the boundaries of the nation – emerged from the 2008 global financial crisis. The book analyses how austerity and scarcity intensified and created new conflicts over who gets what. This extends to struggle over what the British nation is for, who it represents, and who it values.

Drawing on a range of cultural, economic, and political themes – immigration and the hostile environment, nostalgia and Second World War mythology, race and the ‘left behind’, the clap for carers and furloughing, as well as SuperScrimpers and stand-up comedy – the book traces the complex nationalist path Britain took after the crash, demonstrating how we cannot explain nationalism without reference to the economy, and vice versa.

In analysing the thread that ties the fallout of the crash and austerity, through Brexit, and to the shape of lockdown politics, Britain alone provides an incisive and original history of the last decade of Britain and its relationship to the global economy.

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This book recounts the little-known history of the mixed-race children born to black American servicemen and white British women during the Second World War. Of the three million American soldiers stationed in Britain from 1942 to 1945, about 8 per cent (240,000) were African-American; the latter’s relationships with British women resulted in the birth of an estimated 2,000 babies. The African-American press named these children ‘brown babies’; the British called them ‘half-castes’. Black GIs, in this segregated army, were forbidden to marry their white girlfriends. Up to half of the mothers of these babies, faced with the stigma of illegitimacy and a mixed-race child, gave their children up for adoption. The outcome for these children tended to be long-term residency in children’s homes, sometimes followed by fostering and occasionally adoption, but adoption societies frequently would not take on ‘coloured’ children, who were thought to be ‘too hard to place’. There has been minimal study of these children and the difficulties they faced, such as racism in a (then) very white Britain, lack of family or a clear identity. Accessibly written and illustrated with numerous photographs, this book presents the stories of over forty of these children. While some of the accounts of early childhood are heart-breaking, there are also many uplifting narratives of finding American fathers and gaining a sense of self and of heritage.

Liam Stanley

For the last three and a half years, this country has felt trapped, like a lion in a cage. We have all shared the same frustration – like some super-green supercar blocked in the traffic. We can see the way ahead. We know where we want to go – and we know why we are stuck. Boris Johnson, Introduction to 2019 Conservative Party Manifesto, Get Brexit Done: Unleash Britain's Potential

in Britain alone
Pat Thane

10 Voluntary action in Britain since Beveridge Pat Thane What is ‘voluntary action’? One of the difficulties of discussing voluntary action, which has perhaps become even more acute since Beveridge’s day, is the sheer variety of forms of activity that it can encompass. Indeed, in recent decades in Britain, the very language we use to discuss them has become more diverse and contested. Some organisations which were once staffed mainly by volunteers are now highly professionalised with a substantial salaried workforce, and receive significant government funding

in Beveridge and voluntary action in Britain and the wider British world
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A short history
Graham Harrison

3 Africa–Britain: a short history Introduction This chapter makes a review of British-African interactions through history. It does not make a claim to anything but the most general review, and this is because the purpose here is simply to provide the general coordinates for the more detailed considerations of the historical changes in Africa’s representation in Britain in subsequent chapters. The focus is on the nature of the political relations between Africa and Britain and the main ways in which Africa has been ‘domesticated’ into the British polity. The

in The African presence
Anne-Marie Fortier

Citizenisation processes are designed to redress the ‘citizenship deficit’ of migrants. However, an overlooked feature of theoretical and policy understandings of citizenisation is how they not only operate as a social intervention, as argued in the previous chapter. It is also how they shape definitions of the nation-state itself. This chapter turns to the history of British citizenship and to how the perceived ‘citizenship deficit’ of Britain has long since been the subject of political and scholarly discourse. Cast in this way, histories

in Uncertain citizenship
Religion, race, gender and class
Anthony Webster

6 Cultural explanations of British imperialism II: religion, race, gender and class The emergence of post-colonial theory in the late 1970s, and responses to it during the years which followed, helped inspire extensive work on specific aspects of culture and imperialism. Wider social and academic developments also encouraged this new interest in imperial culture. The rise of immigrant communities and cultures in Britain and Europe from former colonies in the 1960s inspired interest in earlier encounters between metropolitan and colonial societies and value

in The Debate on the Rise of the British Empire