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Exploring gender, anti-racism, and homonormativity in Shamim Sarif ’s The World Unseen (2001) and I Can’t Think Straight (2008)
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

socially conditioned to accept the advances of suitors of her same religious background. Sarif’s narratives suggest that, as regards marriage, British Muslim and cosmopolitan Arab communities are too religiously exclusive and that they foster monoculturalism rather than multicultural exchange, although they show how this is not just a symptom of a crisis in British multiculturalism, but that it also affects Christian families based in both Britain and the Middle East. The culturally hermetic character of ethno-religious unions does not chiefly

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
Queering ethnicity and British Muslim masculinities in Sally El Hosaini’s My Brother the Devil (2012)
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

the strictures placed on queer Muslim desire. El Hosaini’s short film contrasts significantly with Sarif’s life-affirming examination of female homosexuality in a British multicultural context, offering the tragic flip-side of Muslim same-sex desire: whereas Sarif’s protagonists rebelled and distanced themselves from their families’ dogmatic positions on homosexuality, El Hosaini’s short film offers a more pessimistic resolution, showing the limited range of options offered to those Muslims who refuse to conform to their diasporic community’s societal and familial

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
Queer phenomenology, and cultural and religious commodifi cation in Hanif Kureishi’s My Beautiful Laundrette (1985) and The Buddha of Suburbia (1990)
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

’s cousin Tania. They seem to fit the more polymorphous and fluid term ‘queer’. Omar and Johnny’s bodies become intertwined in the human tapestry of British multiculturalism, a rebellion against what Amartya Sen perceives as the threat of contemporary British ‘plural monoculturalism’ ( 2006 , p. 157). However, the queer relations between Omar’s mixed-race diasporic body and Johnny’s white British body do not happen in a vacuum or in an alternative heuristic space reserved for queer dissidence; rather, they intimately engage their surroundings

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film