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David Gribble

: Sudbury Valley School, Massachusetts; the School of Self-Determination, Moscow; Tokyo Shure, Japan; le Centre Energie, Madagascar; Krätzä, Berlin; Tamariki, Christchurch, New Zealand; Highfield Junior School, Plymouth, England; la Fundación Educativa Pestalozzi, Quito, Ecuador; Sands School, Ashburton, England; the Democratic School of Hadera, Israel; Dr. Albizo Campos Puerto Rican High School, Chicago; the Butterflies organisation for street and working children, Delhi; Moo Baan Dek children’s village, Thailand. I have met people from all these places, and visited all

in Changing anarchism
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Regions and universities in the post-2008 world
Chris Duke, Michael Osborne, and Bruce Wilson

overload, intrusive media and incomprehensible ‘butterfly-wing’ connectivity added to old-fashioned power politics make for a toxic brew. In this global world local action and local solutions become more attractive and more compellingly effective. Here things can be handled with better judgement based in better understanding of diverse realities – ‘context is everything’. The concept of the learning region is central to this way of problem-solving. Like ‘lifelong learning’ the term is used variously and carelessly. Chapter 3 explores the meaning and importance of the

in A new imperative
Martin Yuille and Bill Ollier

work to minimise the risk to loss of viability of the system. A simple transmission belt of ‘instructions’ from our DNA to our bodies just does not exist. Look once more at the butterfly. It starts the life cycle as an egg, developing into a caterpillar, then a chrysalis and then a flying insect. At all stages it has, as far as we know, precisely the same set of DNA ‘instructions’. The point is that the organism does not just get DNA instructions to change its form. It also gets instructions from elsewhere. These come from other molecules like proteins inside the

in Saving sick Britain
Chris Duke, Michael Osborne, and Bruce Wilson

and of the fluttering butterfly-wing that can tumble distant empires. These expressions refer to the combination and interaction of formally separate and perhaps dispersed processes and events that can together prove toxic and catastrophic. Interconnectivity and interdependency have entered common awareness; changed practice takes longer to follow. For action to follow perception policy discourse needs to change from ‘we can’t possibly do that’ to ‘we cannot possibly not do this’. For national and international governance the ‘global problematique’ embraces all

in A new imperative
Martin Yuille and Bill Ollier

, think about metamorphosis. A caterpillar starts life as one jigsaw puzzle and ends up as another – a butterfly. These two forms of life have precisely the same genetic blueprint. So, under different conditions, the blueprint can be used in completely different ways. In plants, think of the amazing transformation of a deciduous tree between winter and summer. In humans, think of the plasticity of our brains. Throughout our lives, the brain is making and breaking contacts between nerve cells. From the moment we are born at, say, four kilos to our adult weight twenty

in Saving sick Britain
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Martin Yuille and Bill Ollier

, but this too is a form of prevention where the aim is to reduce risks to life from the animal’s exposome (see Chapter 7 ). In some species, natural prevention has occasionally taken the form of self-medication. 3 Fruit flies preferentially lay their eggs in high-ethanol food to reduce the risk to the progeny of infection by parasitic wasps. Wood ants incorporate into their nests antimicrobial resins from conifer trees so as to prevent microbial growth that would harm individual ants and the colony as a whole. Monarch butterflies infected with a parasite

in Saving sick Britain
Jamie Heckert

of the closet, spoke powerfully about his experiences: ‘The butterfly and chrysalis scenario – that’s what it felt like. Coming from a caterpillar into a butterfly – that’s what it felt like. To be able to just float off. That first summer when I came out, that was what it felt like. It was amazing. Absolutely amazing.’ Relief and freedom were themes that came up in many people’s stories, as was the idea of being able to be one’s true self. Betty said: ‘I don’t think you can ever be yourself until you come out on some level.’ Although most of the participants

in Changing anarchism
Reflections on contemporary anarchism, anti-capitalism and the international scene
Karen Goaman

-blue-black sea turtles, marching beneath a huge inflatable turtle. Others are dressed as business tycoons on stilts, alongside monarch butterflies, vegetables, fish and pigs. Drummers beat out the rhythms of resistance in what was to become a significant element in major summit protests. Messages on banners and placards highlight the diversity of those present, with radical environmental groups alongside indigenous rights groups and so on (Slyk, 2002: 56). The Direct Action Network has co-ordinated nonviolent direct action by ten thousand people to stop delegates entering the

in Changing anarchism
Bill Jones

their own perceptions and powers of reason in deciding on which party to bestow their support. Apart from the smaller numbers which now gave more or less automatic support, voters’ allegiance was ‘up for grabs’. Denver points out that even the apparent stability of Conservative successes during the 1980s was not based on an unchanging, solid block of voters but on ‘A temporary coalition of voters which then dissolved in the inter-election periods’. So it seems voters had emerged from the chrysalis of class loyalty as a butterfly which fluttered from party to party

in British politics today
Abstract only
Pioneering Feminist
Ada Uzoamaka Azodo

knocked at every corner: Wolof drums; the poetic flights of the young women at the river; sails outstretched like butterfly wings; men and women from Galam, Niger, Sudan; bare bodies and elaborate coiffures; ornaments; shouts, calls; sudden passion and laughter – all this spoke to the little girl in a language she recognised as her own. All this beat with a pulse that she felt in her veins. Bâ would later write: “I was eight years old and I cried, Tam-tam, take me away.” 4 A Childhood in Dakar and Other Early Influences

in The Pan-African Pantheon