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Reading Elizabeth Smart
Heather Walton

passage where the narrator meditates upon her own many different faces and the reflection of her image in her lover: The mirror is the best breeder. On lucky nights it returned me my face as if it were bestowing a proud honour: this is the face that launched a thousand nights of love … But sometimes, alone, it caught my eyes like two butterflies on pins … The sight of that mad face in the half-lit room drove me to prayers and loud noise. Your own shadow meeting you announces the end … But again and again when I peer in the mirror to find a distortion of my own image

in Literature, theology and feminism
The conversion of Irish Catholics, c.1721–34
Andrew Sneddon

not worth a butterfly’ and ‘one swallow makes no summer’.129 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 Hutchinson, Almanack (2nd edn), p. ii. Ibid., p. iii. Ibid., p. v. Hutchinson, Church catechism in Irish, p. 35. Ibid. Hutchinson, Almanack (2nd edn), p. v. Ibid., p. ii. Ibid., sig. A1V [title page]. Ibid., p. iii. Ibid., pp. 16, 18, 13. Ibid., pp. 16, 14. 168 Ireland Although it ran to two editions identical in content,130 the Almanack failed to persuade other authors to publish texts that used phonetic Irish. In fact no other Protestant work was published

in Witchcraft and Whigs
Heather Walton

mother and to the child that she must separate from to love. This is the divided subject beatified: Recovered childhood, dreamed peace restored, in sparks, flash of cells, instant of laughter, smiles in the blackness of dreams, at night opaque joy that roots me in her bed, my mother’s, and projects him, a son, a butterfly soaking up dew from her hand, there, nearby, in the night. Alone: she, I and he. (Kristeva, 1987b: 247) 112 This extract is an example of Kristeva at her most brilliant and most disturbing. For what space, apart from psychosis, is there for a woman

in Literature, theology and feminism
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How it changed
Rosemary O’Day

which had not been radically redefined and which the enhanced demands of the Tudor state had rendered in many ways more onerous. It was political necessity, not personal vanity, which dictated that their housekeeping should still be consistent with the life style of magnates.26 But the pressures upon them made this difficult if not impossible to achieve. ‘When a new bishop of Norwich arrived in 1603 many gentlemen flew in “like butterflies in the springe” but moved on when they found “little hope of benefit”.’27 It was not only that the bishops had no official

in The Debate on the English Reformation
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Cara Delay

mother spent an entire day selecting a dress and a veil, and they negotiated everything from shoes (O’Keefe wanted black; her mother white) to socks. The morning of the big event, O’Keefe woke too early with ‘butterflies’ and wished to get dressed hours before the communion. She also struggled with fasting. ‘It had all seemed very noble when Sister Genevieve explained it’, she recalled, ‘but now I just felt hungry’.132 At the chapel, O’Keefe and her friends preened and compared dresses, but then nervousness hit her once more. Like most girls, O’Keefe searched for the

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
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Freethinking feminists and the renunciation of religion
Laura Schwartz

Christianity, because its study is too troublesome or its practice inconvenient – the butterflies of society who sport in the sunshine of the moment, cannot be correctly termed infidels. 28 Martin maintained that she had become an infidel not because she had been unwilling to receive the grace of God; to the contrary, she had earnestly sought it, and ‘nay more [I

in Infidel feminism
Tom Betteridge

owns the holes in windows or escape fate; it is redundant in terms of producing either justice or meaning. As the text progresses, it starts to reflect more closely specific events from the Edwardian period. Eventually the Spider and Fly agree to appoint two arbitrators, an Ant and a Butterfly, who are asked to hear and judge the case. However, when this arbitration does not seem to be going in their favour, the Spiders suddenly build a great castle in the cobweb. The Flies, on hearing of the Spiders’ action, threaten to hang the Ant from ‘the tree of reformation (as

in Literature and politics in the English Reformation
Andrew J. May

his family had been in residence since the midsixteenth century. Among other collectibles, the ‘bachelor duke’ had developed an obsession with orchids after seeing the Psychopsis papilio at an exhibition in London in 1833. The flower motif of this butterfly orchid is carved into the trellis pattern of the golden picture frames in the Gold

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
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Andrew J. May

grandmother Susannah Halford with a short account of life at the station: the long rides she enjoyed on a pony given to her by judge Skipwith in Sylhet; her older sister Susan taking a sketch of the bungalow; her Aunt Emily Brownlow making social calls on the Rabans; her younger sister collecting butterflies for Mrs Garstin. Emily also wrote with pride of her little nephew Thomas, who

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
R. N. Swanson

. CHAPTER 25 Many men are covetous for worldly honour and earthly riches, and think night and day, sleeping and waking, how and by what means they might achieve them, and forget to consider themselves, and the pains of Hell and the joys of Heaven. Surely they are not wise, they are like the children who run after a butterfly, and because they do not watch their feet

in Catholic England