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Representations of Marseille
Joseph McGonagle

cuts to them diving naked into the sea at night, the camera noticeably focusing on their black and brown bodies as they swim and splash one another amidst the waves. In a reminder of the Caribbean poet Derek Walcott’s (1996) notion that ‘the sea is history’, this scene poetically celebrates Marseille’s diverse ethnic heritage and the port’s significant role in France’s history of immigration; the vitality and energy of the young multi-ethnic crowd fused with a raï soundtrack. Later, as they arrive home, the same song spills from their car stereo just as, in the

in Representing ethnicity in contemporary French visual culture
Abstract only
Joseph McGonagle

particularly intriguing. This book probes some of the diverse ways in which different ethnicities have been represented across contemporary French visual culture. As Cole (2005: 201) has argued, France is well placed geographically. By sharing a land border with six European countries and being connected to England by an undersea channel, it can plausibly claim to be at the crossroads of Europe. Directly across the Mediterranean lie three Maghrebi countries it formerly ruled and it still possesses overseas territories in the Caribbean, South America and in the Indian and

in Representing ethnicity in contemporary French visual culture
Engaging with ethnicity
Joseph McGonagle

given no details about her ethnic heritage, were one to presume that she is of Martinican or Guadaloupean heritage, the portrait could be interpreted as a comment on the prominence of mothers in many Caribbean cultures and families, the cult of the body among some black diasporas, and the dark brown bottle alongside her – possibly of rum – as an allusion to the role of trade, history and migration in the formation of ethnicities. Unlike the many white women pictured throughout the book, however, this portrait seems coded in other specific ways: her pose emphasises her

in Representing ethnicity in contemporary French visual culture
John Mundy and Glyn White

intolerance in Britain of the period remained an issue for not just Afro-Caribbean and Asian ethnic groups but all minorities, as the comedy series Mind Your Language 1977-79) shows. Promoted as a ‘new multi-racial comedy series’, it featured Barry Evans teaching English language to a diverse range of foreign adults in an evening class. As might be expected, the comedy revolved around linguistic

in Laughing matters
Abstract only
Representing people of Algerian heritage
Joseph McGonagle

Representing ethnicity Moving forward to the third téléfilm of the franchise, Aïcha 3: La Grande Débrouille (2011), here Benguigui’s focus on cité life broadens to encompass greater ethnic diversity among the main cast of characters. The local campaign spearheaded by Nedjma to fix the broken lifts in their tower block – itself a metaphor for the lack of social mobility in the cité (Kealhofer 2013: 192) – brings together a range of residents, including Maurice, a retired white man who speaks Creole and the black French Caribbean actress Firmine Richard in the role of Ginette

in Representing ethnicity in contemporary French visual culture