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Jeremy Gregory

England was increasingly established; the north-east, where Congregationalism was the effective establishment; and the middle colonies, which were, on the face of it, more tolerant and more pluralistic. 2 There was also a strong Anglican presence in several of the Caribbean Islands, most notably Barbados, Jamaica, and the Leeward Islands. 3 The church’s status in the colonies during the late Stuart period thus mirrored its

in The later Stuart Church, 1660–1714
Silence and slavery in Quaker narratives of journeys to America and Barbados
Hilary Hinds

English colonies of the Caribbean and North America. In 1654 Quakerism moved south from its seedbeds in the north, establishing important urban bases in London and Bristol; in 1655, the first Quakers crossed the Atlantic, travelling to Barbados and to mainland America.10 From then on, hardly a year passed without English Friends making this journey, whether to effect conversions, to counter persecution or to rally backsliders. Accounts of these journeys took several forms, principally narrative and epistolary, but also, on occasion, daily notebook entries. This chapter

in George Fox and early Quaker culture
Abstract only
Laura Schwartz

, www.rawa.org/rawa.html. 15 A not for profit feminist organisation designed to meet the needs of Asian and Afro-Caribbean women. 16 R. Gupta, ‘Feminism and the Soul of Secularism, 8 March 2011, www.opendemocracy.net/5050/rahila-gupta/feminism-and-soul-of-secularism [accessed 14 November 2011

in Infidel feminism
Roshan Allpress

circles’, the outermost of which was a, ‘remoter multitude … from Gades to Ganges’.85 This outer sphere too was subdivided, and within the pious community of Clapham, ‘Every human interest had its guardian, every region of the globe its representative. If the African continent and the Caribbean Archipelago were assigned to an indefatigable protectorate, New Holland was not forgotten, nor was British India without a patron.’86 The various regions of the globe were each assigned their own patron saints, who also mediated Britain’s growing second empire to a domestic

in Making and remaking saints in nineteenth-century Britain
Abstract only
The later Stuart church in context
Grant Tapsell

England existed within a constellation of Protestant churches throughout the British Isles and continental Europe, as well as having increasing interests further afield in the North American colonies, the islands of the Caribbean, and nascent outposts in Africa and Asia. 47 What was far out of sight could nevertheless trouble the mind of a senior cleric like Bishop Fell, who, four years before his outburst to the parochial

in The later Stuart Church, 1660–1714
Abstract only
Tony Kushner

of theory, ‘less intimidated by and respectful of the boundaries and integrity of modern nation states’. He thus settled as his starting point on the image of ships in motion across the spaces between Europe, America, Africa and the Caribbean as a central organising symbol … The image of the ship – a living, micro-cultural, micro-political system in motion – is especially important for historical and theoretical reasons. Ships immediately focus attention on the middle passage, on the various projects for redemptive return, on the

in Anglo-Jewry since 1066
Abstract only
Seamless subjects
Hilary Hinds

just as Chapter 4 demonstrates how temporal boundaries are erased through the narrative form taken by the Journal, so Chapter 5 suggests that the journeys recorded there erase the boundaries between different early modern conceptions of space. Chapter 6 continues the examination of spatiality in the early movement, but broadens the focus to look at the seventeenth-century Quaker presence in transatlantic English colonies in the Caribbean and North America. Its starting M2500 - HINDS PRINT.indd 7 02/03/2011 13:31 8 GEORGE FOX AND EARLY QUAKER CULTURE point is a

in George Fox and early Quaker culture
Tony Kushner

Hampshire: A Sense of Place generally employs a pluralistic approach to the county’s identity. Hampshire, Mason emphasises, has been enriched by the cultures and traditions of the Black and Asian communities and other ethnic minority groups. The main minority communities are Pakistani, Indian, Bangladeshi, Afro-Caribbean and Chinese. There are also other smaller groups including Polish, Greek, Vietnamese and Cypriots, all contributing to a multi-racial society in Hampshire. 57 Mason, writing in a semi-official capacity

in Anglo-Jewry since 1066
The biblical identity politics of the Demerara Slave Rebellion
John Coffey

On the evening of Monday 18 August 1823, revolt broke out in the British sugar colony of Demerara. Situated on the north-east coast of South America (in what is now Guyana), Demerara-Essequibo had a small white population of 2,500, vastly outnumbered by 75,000 black and creole slaves (and around 2,500 free blacks). The rising was sparked by rumours of developments in Britain. In May, the abolitionist Thomas Fowell Buxton had introduced a parliamentary resolution calling for the gradual abolition of British Caribbean slavery, and the government

in Chosen peoples
David Hardiman

context. Catherine Hall, writing of the Caribbean in the early nineteenth century, points out that although white women commonly lamented the suffering of their imagined ‘sisters’ – the black slave women – they too were colonisers. Although the term suggested commonality, it denied the difference and violence of colonialism. While the Western woman was seen as the agent of history, the black woman was the

in Missionaries and their medicine