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James Pereiro

Henry Edward Manning (1808–92) was involved in some of the most pressing social issues of his time, from the defence of workers and trade unionism to finding a solution for the dock strike and the education of the poor. English Catholic social conscience, as a whole and with some singular exceptions, was somewhat slow in following the leadership of the cardinal in some of these matters. This article studies a barely known aspect of Manning’s social activity: his involvement in the British response to the Russian pogroms of 1881–82 and in other contemporary Jewish issues.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
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Liturgical Gloves and the Construction of Public Religious Identity
Cordelia Warr

Within the Catholic Church from around the tenth century onwards, liturgical gloves could be worn on specific occasions by those of the rank of bishop and above. Using a pair of seventeenth-century gloves in the Whitworth as a basis for further exploration, this article explores the meanings ascribed to liturgical gloves and the techniques used to make them. It argues that, within the ceremony of the mass, gloves had a specific role to play in allowing bishops to function performatively in the role of Christ.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Judith Richards

Although the reputation of Englands first queen regnant, Mary Tudor (died 1558) had remained substantially unchanged in the intervening centuries, there were always some defenders of that Catholic queen among the historians of Victorian England. It is worth noting, however, that such revisionism made little if any impact on the schoolroom history textbooks, where Marys reputation remained much as John Foxe had defined it. Such anxiety as there was about attempts to restore something of Marys reputation were made more problematic by the increasing number and increasingly visible presence of a comprehensive Catholic hierarchy in the nineteenth century, and by high-profile converts to the Catholic faith and papal authority. The pre-eminent historians of the later Victorian era consistently remained more favourable to the reign of Elizabeth, seen as the destroyer,of an effective Catholic church in England.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Visualising a changing city

Delving into a hitherto unexplored aspect of Irish art history, Painting Dublin, 1886–1949 examines the depiction of Dublin by artists from the late-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Artists’ representations of the city have long been markers of civic pride and identity, yet in Ireland, such artworks have been overlooked in favour of the rural and pastoral, falling outside of the dominant disciplinary narratives of nationalism or modernism. Framed by the shift from city of empire to capital of an independent republic, this book chiefly examines artworks by of Walter Frederick Osborne (1857–1903), Rose Mary Barton (1856–1929), Jack Butler Yeats (1871–1957), Harry Aaron Kernoff (1900–74), Estella Frances Solomons (1882–1968), and Flora Hippisley Mitchell (1890–1973), encompassing a variety of urban views and artistic themes. While Dublin is renowned for its representation in literature, this book will demonstrate how the city was also the subject of a range of visual depictions, including those in painting and print. Focusing on the images created by these artists as they navigated the city’s streets, this book offers a vivid visualisation of Dublin and its inhabitants, challenging a reengagement with Ireland’s art history through the prism of the city and urban life.

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The material and visual culture of the Stuart Courts, 1589–1619
Author: Jemma Field

This book analyses Anna of Denmark’s material and visual patronage at the Stuart courts, examining her engagement with a wide array of expressive media including architecture, garden design, painting, music, dress, and jewellery. Encompassing Anna’s time in Denmark, England, and Scotland, it establishes patterns of interest and influence in her agency, while furthering our knowledge of Baltic-British transfer in the early modern period. Substantial archival work has facilitated a formative re-conceptualisation of James and Anna’s relationship, extended our knowledge of the constituents of consortship in the period, and has uncovered evidence to challenge the view that Anna followed the cultural accomplishments of her son, Prince Henry. This book reclaims Anna of Denmark as the influential and culturally active royal woman that her contemporaries knew. Combining politics, culture, and religion across the courts of Denmark, Scotland, and England, it enriches our understanding of royal women’s roles in early modern patriarchal societies and their impact on the development of cultural modes and fashions. This book will be of interest to upper level undergraduate and postgraduate students taking courses on early modern Europe in the disciplines of Art and Architectural History, English Literature, Theatre Studies, History, and Gender Studies. It will also attract a wide range of academics working on early modern material and visual culture, and female patronage, while members of the public who enjoy the history of courts and the British royals will also find it distinctively appealing.

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Laura Moure Cecchini

contrast the Baroque – despite the multiple meanings it had accrued over the course of almost five decades – was still too easily conflated with Catholicism. True, several measures had been taken to ease the tension between Italy's Fascist state and religious institutions. For example the 1929 Lateran Pacts rendered relations between the Italian state and the Catholic Church friendlier than they had previously been since the Kingdom of Italy annexed Rome in 1870. Still, Fascist authorities aspired to create ‘a new Italian’, part of

in Baroquemania
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St Michael and All Angels, Sowton and St Mary the Virgin, Ottery St Mary
Jim Cheshire

dare to advocate Sacramental Confession, the Sacrifice of the Eucharist, due honour to the Blessed Virgin … Modern Romanism will never do, it is a lying system and does not elevate. 6 This is the definitive ecclesiological position: the contemporary Roman Catholic church was corrupt and the Church of England must rediscover its Catholic roots and preserve the

in Stained Glass and the Victorian Gothic Revival
Laura Moure Cecchini

on each floor maintain visual variety and interest. The central body is also decorated with motifs inspired by the Baroque and the Rococo styles, especially the double-columned pronaos decorated with volutes, shells, and scrolls. Its curvilinear pediment (a leitmotiv in the building) is a streamlined version of the windows and cornices that Borromini designed for the Palace of Propaganda Fide in Rome's city centre (1646) – a meaningful choice, given that that Propaganda Fide is the branch of the Catholic Church in charge of missionary work, much as schools were

in Baroquemania
Death, decay, and the Technological reliquaries, 1637–67
Erika Doss

pilgrimage. Rome is especially resplendent with what the Catholic church claims as some of the holiest of Christian relics: the heads of St Peter and St Paul, the Holy Umbilical Cord, the left foot of Mary Magdalene, multiple pieces of the True Cross, the skull of St John the Baptist, the finger of ‘doubting’ St Thomas, the ‘incorruptible’ corpse of St Cecilia, the heart and arm of St

in Republics and empires
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Laura Moure Cecchini

exposed breast. It is clear from this political, militaristic framing that Rome is also resolutely secular: the history of the city presented in these postcards – metonymically signifying the history of the Italian peninsula – is an indictment of the Catholic Church's temporal power. Only in one case, the scene with Julius II and Michelangelo, is a Pope presented in a positive light, but even this scene has to do with the Pope's artistic patronage rather than his political influence. All the other postcards exemplify the submission of the spiritual to the temporal power

in Baroquemania