Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 152 items for :

  • "Catholicism" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
From Galway to Cloyne and beyond

This book engages with the spectacular disenchantment with Catholicism in Ireland over the relatively short period of four decades. It begins with the visit of Pope John Paul II in 1979 and in particular his address to young people in Galway, where the crowd had been entertained beforehand by two of Ireland’s most celebrated clerics, Bishop Eamon Casey and Fr Michael Cleary, both of whom were engaged at the time in romantic affairs that resulted in the birth of children. It will be argued that the Pope’s visit was prompted by concern at the significant fall in vocations to priesthood and the religious life and the increasing secularism of Irish society.

The book then explores the various referenda that took place during the 1980s on divorce and abortion which, although they resulted in victories for the Church, demonstrated that their hold on the Irish public was weakening. The clerical abuse scandals of the 1990s were the tipping point for an Irish public which was generally resentful of the intrusive and repressive form of Catholicism that had been the norm in Ireland since the formation of the State in the 1920s.

Boasting an impressive array of contributors from various backgrounds and expertise, the essays in the book attempt to delineate the exact reasons for the progressive dismantling of the cultural legacy of Catholicism and the consequences this has had on Irish society. Among the contributors are Patricia Casey, Joe Cleary, Michael Cronin, Louise Fuller, Patsy McGarry, Vincent Twomey and Eamonn Wall.

Church, State and modernity in contemporary Ireland
David Carroll Cochran

  53 3 Dethroning Irish Catholicism: Church, State and modernity in contemporary Ireland David Carroll Cochran In his essay A Catholic Modernity?, the Canadian Catholic philosopher Charles Taylor reflects on how modern secularism’s process of ‘dethroning’ Catholicism, of gradually disentangling the Church from the dominant institutions of societies where it long held political and social power, has paradoxically extended many of Catholicism’s core commitments and liberated it to find a new and creative voice within modernity. Taylor is reacting to a general

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism
A time of hope!
Vincent Twomey

  89 5 Contemporary Irish Catholicism: A time of hope! Vincent Twomey So-​called traditional Irish Catholicism is largely the product of historical and cultural processes in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, as I have tried to point out in The End of Irish Catholicism? (Twomey 2003). It had many weaknesses. However, it also had many strengths. New religious orders, such as the Irish Christian Brothers, the Presentation and Mercy Sisters, were founded in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries by remarkable men and women such as Blessed Edmund Rice, the

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism
Michele Dillon

4147 Inglis–Are the Irish different_BB_Layout 1 29/07/2014 09:26 Page 110 11 The difference between Irish and American Catholicism Michele Dillon When, during the historic papal visit in 1979, Pope John Paul II and the archbishop of Dublin Dr Dermot Ryan – a tall, lean man of aloof bearing – were riding down O’Connell Street, Dublin, atop the then novel Popemobile, the story goes that an unabashedly direct Moore Street trader woman shouted to Ryan, ‘Sit down lanky. It’s not you we’ve come to see.’ This heckle was recounted repeatedly, prompted by mirth at the

in Are the Irish different?
Editor: Tom Inglis

The Irish mind has enabled the Irish to balance and accommodate imagination and intellect, emotion and reason, poetry and science. The notion of cultural difference is not just an Irish story, but a story of nations and ethnic groups all over the world. The story of modernity revolves around people coming to see and understand themselves as belonging to nations. Although there were other European nations that made Catholicism a keystone of national difference, there were many factors that made the Irish project different. The idea of creating a society that had a collective vision and commitment without being socialist became an ideal of the Catholic Church during the latter half of the twentieth century. The Church did, nevertheless, have a profound influence on Irish society and culture. The extent to which the Catholic Church shaped and influenced Irish politics has been the subject of much research and debate. The power of the Catholic Church in politics stemmed from the power it developed in the modernisation of Irish society and, in particular, the controlling of sexuality, marriage and fertility. During the first half of the twentieth century, the Irish developed a particular aversion to marriage. For many nations and ethnic groups, what binds people together is that they speak the same language. It may well be that for generations many Irish people identified the Irish language, music and sport as an inhibitor in embracing a less insular and more urbane, cosmopolitan disposition.

Author: Bryan Fanning

This book examines the debates and processes that have shaped the modernisation of Ireland since the beginning of the twentieth century. There are compelling justifications for methodological nationalism using research and analysis focused on the jurisdiction of a nation-state. The nation-state remains a necessary unit of analysis not least because it is a unit of taxation and representation, a legal and political jurisdiction, a site of bounded loyalties and of identity politics. The book argues that nationalism in twenty-first-century Ireland is even more powerful and socially embedded than it was in de Valera's Ireland. It considers what kind of Ireland Pearse wanted to bring about. Pearse proposed a model that was very different from the already dominant Catholic model that did much to incubate modern Ireland. Beyond this, Catholicism offered a distinct response to modernity aimed at competing with the two main secular ideologies: liberalism and socialism. Women have been marginalised in most of the debates that shaped Ireland even where they were directly affected by them. One of the most picked-over episodes in twentieth-century Irish history has been the conflict surrounding the Mother and Child Scheme. The book examines this conflict as a starting point of an analysis of the place of women in post-independence Ireland. It further addresses the rise and fall of the Celtic Tiger, the name given to a period of rapid economic growth that was likened to the performance of East Asian 'tiger' economies.

Bryan Fanning

5 A Catholic vision of Ireland In his 1911 novel The Dawn of All, Robert Hugh Benson, an English priest who converted to Catholicism (his father had been the Archbishop of Canterbury), imagined a future where most of the world had done the same. The Dawn of All recounts the story of a former priest living in a future atheistic 1973, who regains consciousness in a London hospital, in an England where the Reformation and secularism have been reversed. In this vision, religion had no influence in society and priests had no relevance. In the remainder of the book

in Irish adventures in nation-building
Louise Fuller

, who had been secretary to Pope Paul VI, Pope John Paul I and John Paul II, resigned as a result. In 1979, all had seemed well in Irish Catholicism, and the enthusiasm surrounding the Pope’s visit would have conveyed that to any outside observer. A  comprehensive survey of values and attitudes in the mid-​ 1970s recorded that 91 per cent of Irish Catholics attended mass weekly (Catholic Communications Institute of Ireland 1975:  71). But cracks were beginning to appear as early as the 1950s and certainly in the 1960s. However, the period addressed here, 1979 to 2011

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism
Bryan Fanning

Henry paintings of the rural landscape, on Irish bank notes, in the plays of John B. Keane and many others, in John Ford’s movie The Quiet Man, in tourism advertising campaigns as well as in intellectual texts such as The Hidden Ireland by Daniel Corkery.25 The second main plank of the cultural nation-building project that did much to define post-independence representations of Irish identity was Catholicism. Amongst some intellectuals, cultural de-colonisation goals and Catholic antipathy to the Reformation and the Enlightenment sat well together. Insofar as

in Irish adventures in nation-building
Bryan Fanning

4147 Inglis–Are the Irish different_BB_Layout 1 29/07/2014 09:26 Page 44 5 A Catholic vision of Ireland Bryan Fanning In his 1911 novel The Dawn of All, Robert Hugh Benson, an English priest who converted to Catholicism (his father had been the Archbishop of Canterbury), imagined a future where most of the world had done the same. The Dawn of All recounts the story of a former priest living in a future atheistic 1973, who regains consciousness in a London hospital, in an England where the Reformation and secularism have been reversed. In this vision, religion

in Are the Irish different?