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Dolto, psychoanalysis and Catholicism from Occupation to Liberation
Richard Bates

their disagreements about who should practise psychoanalysis and what exactly it was for. The resulting split in the movement had complex causes, but this chapter contends that underlying politico-religious tensions, linked to choices made under the Occupation, were a factor. The desire of Catholic thinkers grouped around the journals Psyché and Études carmélitaines to reconcile Catholicism and psychoanalysis, specifically by focusing on the theme of guilt, created tensions with some Jewish analysts that were connected to

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
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Doltomania
Richard Bates

Catholicism to help bring about a French national recovery, Dolto perceived revitalising possibilities in Pétainism, but subsequently found that her holistic-psychoanalytic orientation also sat easily in the political context of the Liberation period. The chapter further examines Dolto’s Christianity, especially regarding her approach to the themes of sexuality and guilt in the context of broader developments in French Catholicism and psychoanalysis after 1945. The 1953 split in French psychoanalysis is shown to have had religious

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
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Psychoanalysis in interwar France
Richard Bates

Catholic-nationalist politics. He once described himself, in a letter to the Action Française leader Charles Maurras, as ‘entirely Catholic, insofar as Catholicism, as a bastion of the social, familial, and national order, stands opposed to the Jewish or Protestant spirit’. 70 He founded an association, Les Michelots, whose aims included the Francisation of Jewish names – Pichon insisted on referring to Sigmund Freud, for example, as ‘Sigismond’. 71 Rudolph Loewenstein had Pichon in mind when, describing the welcome he

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
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Françoise breaks free?
Richard Bates

practices such as philanthropy, in order to confer social legitimacy on their recently acquired wealth. 13 In the France of the belle époque – polarised around questions of secularisation and clerical influence – outward adherence to Catholicism and anti-Dreyfusard politics underlined one’s alignment with aristocratic values. 14 Dolto’s memoirs suggest that the Marettes saw their weekly attendance at mass, at Passy’s Notre-Dame-de-Grâce church, as the enactment of a social obligation rather than an act of deep piety

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
Patrick Browne (c.1720–90), an Irish botanist and physician in the West Indies
Marc Caball

recruited through home networks. In the absence of a formal Irish colonial project, Irish planters on Montserrat and to a lesser extent on St. Kitts ambitiously exploited the financial opportunities available in the Leeward Islands while accommodating their Catholicism to superficial compliance with Anglicanism. Certainly, the story of the Irish in the Early Modern Caribbean was not exclusively one of successful adaptation on the part of an elite of planters and merchants. The possibility of depositing troublesome Irish elements

in Early Modern Ireland and the world of medicine
Carol Helmstadter

‘polemical arena’ for all the various religious denominations among her nurses. 52 Indicating the centrality of religion and religious controversy in contemporary politics, Herbert asked Nightingale to engage nurses from all religious sects. The number of Roman Catholics in Britain was steadily increasing as Irish immigrants flooded into the workplace, intensifying the powerful tradition of anti-Catholicism in Britain, which went back to the sixteenth century. There had been no Roman Catholic bishops in England since the Reformation, but in 1850 the Pope re

in Beyond Nightingale
Carol Helmstadter

Introduction Of the three systems of nursing used in the Crimean War, government-imposed, nursing sisterhoods, and doctor-directed nursing, religious Sisters were obviously the most successful as a group. However, British Roman Catholic Sisters had a particularly difficult time because of the long-standing anti-Catholic tradition in Britain. Anti-Catholicism also impacted the new Anglican Sisters because they were often mistakenly identified with Catholic nuns. The French and Piedmont-Sardinian Daughters of

in Beyond Nightingale
Suriname under Dutch rule, 1750– 1950

Explaining how leprosy was considered in various historical settings by referring to categories of uncleanliness in antiquity, is problematic. The book historicizes how leprosy has been framed and addressed. It investigates the history of leprosy in Suriname, a plantation society where the vast majority of the population consisted of imported slaves from Africa. The relationship between the modern stigmatization and exclusion of people affected with leprosy, and the political tensions and racial fears originating in colonial slave society, exerting their influence until after the decolonization up to the present day. The book explores leprosy management on the black side of the medical market in the age of slavery as contrasted with the white side. The difference in perspectives on leprosy between African slaves and European masters contributed to the development of the 'Great Confinement' policies, and leprosy sufferers were sent to the Batavia leprosy asylum. Dutch debates about leprosy took place when the threat of a 'return' of leprosy to the Netherlands appeared to materialise. A symbiotic alliance for leprosy care that had formed between the colonial state and the Catholics earlier in the nineteenth century was renegotiated within the transforming landscape of Surinamese society to incorporate Protestants as well. By 1935, Dutch colonial medicine had dammed the growing danger of leprosy by using the modern policies of detection and treatment. Dutch doctors and public health officials tried to come to grips with the Afro-Surinamese belief in treef and its influence on the execution of public health policies.

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Mary Donnelly and Claire Murray

, at best, and the ­normative foundations for decisions remain largely unexplored. The stifling impact of religious ethos, in particular that of Catholicism, is often cited as an explanation for the lack of debate around ethical issues in healthcare in Ireland in the past (McDonnell and Allison, 2006). However, given the increasingly secularised nature of contemporary Irish society (Inglis, 1998), it is no longer feasible to attribute an ongoing lack of debate to this source. Moreover, simple stereotyping based on conceptions of Catholicism or secularism is largely

in Ethical and legal debates in Irish healthcare
Open Access (free)
Benoît Majerus and Joris Vandendriessche

: liberalism and Catholicism. Private initiative was not stifled; on the contrary, it was encouraged. Mental asylums in nineteenth-century Belgium, for example, were not state-run institutions like in France; they were generally run by religious congregations. In 1876, these congregations managed three-quarters of all the country’s psychiatric patients. 19 The psychiatric infrastructure shows that in Belgium, more than elsewhere in

in Medical histories of Belgium