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Catherine L. Benamou and Leslie L. Marsh

activities to mobilise others to join or collaborate in their efforts. Owing to the possibility of its circulation outside mainstream venues, small-format video was seen as especially effective in its ability to reach lower-income and regionally isolated (sometimes illiterate) audiences. Hence, video quickly played a vital role in expanding the discourses of citizenship during the 1980s. Spotlight on

in Hispanic and Lusophone women filmmakers
A Session at the 2019 Modern Language Association Convention
Robert Jackson, Sharon P. Holland, and Shawn Salvant

“Interventions” was the organizing term for the presentations of three Baldwin scholars at the Modern Language Association Convention in Chicago in January of 2019. Baldwin’s travels and activities in spaces not traditionally associated with him, including the U.S. South and West, represent interventions of a quite literal type, while his aesthetic and critical encounters with these and other cultures, including twenty-first-century contexts of racial, and racist, affect—as in the case of Raoul Peck’s 2016 film I Am Not Your Negro—provide opportunities to reconsider his work as it contributes to new thinking about race, space, property, citizenship, and aesthetics.

James Baldwin Review
The infrastructure of everyday life

The well-being of Europe’s citizens depends less on individual consumption and more on their social consumption of essential goods and services – from water and retail banking to schools and care homes – in what we call the foundational economy. Individual consumption depends on market income, while foundational consumption depends on social infrastructure and delivery systems of networks and branches, which are neither created nor renewed automatically, even as incomes increase. This historically created foundational economy has been wrecked in the last generation by privatisation, outsourcing, franchising and the widespread penetration of opportunistic and predatory business models. The distinctive, primary role of public policy should therefore be to secure the supply of basic services for all citizens (not a quantum of economic growth and jobs). Reconstructing the foundational has to start with a vision of citizenship that identifies foundational entitlements as the conditions for dignified human development, and likewise has to depend on treating the business enterprises central to the foundational economy as juridical persons with claims to entitlements but also with responsibilities and duties. If the aim is citizen well-being and flourishing for the many not the few, then European politics at regional, national and EU level needs to be refocused on foundational consumption and securing universal minimum access and quality. If/when government is unresponsive, the impetus for change has to come from engaging citizens locally and regionally in actions which break with the top down politics of ‘vote for us and we will do this for you’.

BBC television and Black Britons

This book provides an institutional case study of the BBC Television Service, as it undertook the responsibility of creating programmes that addressed the impact of black Britons, their attempts to establish citizenship within England and subsequent issues of race relations and colour prejudice. Beginning in the 1930s and into the post millennium, the book provides a historical analysis of policies invoked, and practices undertaken, as the Service attempted to assist white Britons in understanding the impact of African-Caribbeans on their lives, and their assimilation into constructs of Britishness. Management soon approved talks and scientific studies as a means of examining racial tensions, as ITV challenged the discourses of British broadcasting. Soon after, BBC 2 began broadcasting, and more issues of race appeared on the TV screens, each reflecting sometimes comedic, somewhat dystopic, often problematic circumstances of integration. In the years that followed, however, social tensions, such as those demonstrated by the Nottingham and Notting Hill riots, led to transmissions that included a series of news specials on Britain's Colour Bar, and docudramas, such as A Man From the Sun, which attempted to frame the immigrant experience for British television audiences, but from the African-Caribbean point of view. Subsequent chapters include an extensive analysis of television programming, along with personal interviews. Topics include current representations of race, the future of British television, and its impact upon multiethnic audiences. Also detailed are the efforts of Black Britons working within the British media as employees of the BBC, writers, producers and actors.

The documentary legacy of Sara Gómez in three contemporary Cuban women filmmakers
María Caridad Cumaná González and Susan Lord

of cultural citizenship, diaspora, revolutionary legacy and globalisation, and they do so through what we call ‘deterritorialised intimacies’. These intimacies are afforded by their documentary practices of decolonised ethnography: a set of aesthetic and ethical documentary strategies that are expressive of historical and emotional geographies of belonging and non-belonging for the filmmaker, subject

in Hispanic and Lusophone women filmmakers

component of the polity – the citizen. What does it mean to be a citizen? The most influential European answer to that question was provided by T.H. Marshall in his 1950 essay on social citizenship. Here history is represented as ‘the enrichment of the status of citizenship through the progressive extension of rights from eighteenth-century civil rights through nineteent-century political rights to twentieth-century social welfare’ (Marshall 1950 , p. 33). Marshall's answer was, of course, partial – implicitly he provided an account of the gains made by male, working

in Foundational Economy
Abstract only
Foundational matters

discussion of policy responses. Chapter 3 presents a ‘follow-the-money’ analysis of how and why privatisation and outsourcing disappoint and damage, while Chapter 4 presents an argument about the rights and duties of citizenship. If post-1980 privatisation and outsourcing have ended in disappointment, this relates partly to specific issues about irrelevant regulation in privatised utilities and crisis-prone conglomerates in outsourcing. Regulation of privatised utilities was dominated by economists focused on policing prices and investment and

in Foundational Economy
Normative masculinity and disciplined gun violence
Justin A. Joyce

of conveying a ‘certain image of a man, a style, which expresses itself most clearly in violence.’18 As I argue, the inverse is equally true: the Western exhibits a style of violence that expresses itself most clearly as masculinity. I contend in this chapter that the Western genre’s masculine style functions as a ‘technology of citizenship,’ a disciplinary apparatus that seeks to tame the exercise of personal gun violence. I draw the term ‘technology of citizenship’ from Barbara Cruikshank, which she defines in The Will to Empower: Democratic Citizens and Other

in Gunslinging justice
Tom Whittaker

, the film seeks to appeal to our emotions. As I will show, the affective structure of Miró’s film is a particularly revealing framework for exploring the ways in which female citizenship and identity were renegotiated during the transition. Although the Spanish Constitution recognised women as ‘equal’ citizens, women were still not socially and

in Hispanic and Lusophone women filmmakers
Abstract only
Actor and activist

The autobiography of Kitty Marion was written in the early 1930s but never published. It records Marion’s childhood in Germany, her life in British provincial theatre and music hall and her campaigns against the ‘casting couch’, a career as a militant suffragist or suffragette during which she committed numerous acts of arson, was imprisoned and suffered force feeding, and finally her move to America and involvement in the American birth control movement. The Epilogue details her life in New York after the end of the autobiography, including her work in the Federal Theatre Project, while the three appendices reproduce extracts from key archive documents which throw additional light on the autobiography. An Introduction outlines the problems Marion incurred trying to publish her story, its subsequent history and addresses some of the issues that her story raises about women’s history of activism.