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Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

(frequently) variable ways (see also Jarvis and Lister 2015a ). In order to assess these impacts upon security and citizenship more specifically, this chapter offers a brief overview of our own approach to these complex and contested concepts. We begin by exploring how recent scholarship on security has sought, first, to escape the state-centrism of earlier work in this area and, second, to examine the

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Authors: Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

This book explores how different publics make sense of and evaluate anti-terrorism powers within the UK, and the implications of this for citizenship and security.

Since 9/11, the UK’s anti-terrorism framework has undergone dramatic changes, including with the introduction of numerous new pieces of legislation. Drawing on primary empirical research, this book examines the impact of these changes on security and citizenship, as perceived by citizens themselves. We examine such impacts on different communities within the UK, and find that generally, whilst white individuals were not unconcerned about the effects of anti-terrorism, ethnic minority citizens (and not Muslim communities alone) believe that anti-terrorism measures have had a direct, negative impact on various dimensions of their citizenship and security.

This book thus offers the first systematic engagement with ‘vernacular’ or ‘everyday’ understandings of anti-terrorism policy, citizenship and security. Beyond an empirical analysis of citizen attitudes, it argues that while transformations in anti-terrorism frameworks impact on public experiences of security and citizenship, they do not do so in a uniform, homogeneous, or predictable manner. At the same time, public understandings and expectations of security and citizenship themselves shape how developments in anti-terrorism frameworks are discussed and evaluated. The relationships between these phenomenon, in other words, are both multiple and co-constitutive. By detailing these findings, this book adds depth and complexity to existing studies of the impact of anti-terrorism powers.

The book will be of interest to a wide range of academic disciplines including Political Science, International Relations, Security Studies and Sociology.

Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

This chapter follows the previous discussion of public evaluations of anti-terrorism powers by examining the impact thereof on citizens and citizenship more specifically. Two main findings from our research are discussed. First, that anti-terrorism powers have impacted – variably – on four key aspects of citizenship: rights, participation, identity and duties. As

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Editor’s Introduction
Juliano Fiori

political agenda to promote individual entitlements that transcend national citizenship ( Moyn, 2010 ). In his inaugural address, in January 1977, President Jimmy Carter declared that ‘Our commitment to human rights must be absolute’ (quoted in Moyn, 2014: 69 ). Under the guardianship of the UN, following the UDHR in 1948, the concept of human rights had lacked prescriptive force; only once adopted by the US as an instrument of order and hegemony did it become the basis for a global movement. For many liberal commentators at the turn of the 1990s

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
David Rieff

moral obligation to take a political stance that citizenship imposes. 5 No such ‘opt out’ is available with regard to the boat people at sea or the migrants in Calais and other French port cities, camped as they endeavour to find a way to get to Britain. The fact that where one stands with regard to the migrants has become the defining political and moral issue in the EU makes even a semblance of humanitarian ‘neutrality’ an impossibility. And rightly so. At present, however, European relief NGOs seem to want to maintain the fiction that their

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

practicality prevents it). This is the same foundational commitment that animates human rights work. The humanist core to both of these forms of social practice is a similar kind of belief in the ultimate priority of moral claims made by human beings as human beings rather than as possessors of any markers of identity or citizenship. What differences exist between humanitarianism and human rights are largely sociological – the contextual specifics of the evolution of two different forms of social activism. I have argued elsewhere, for example, that

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

, cosmopolitan citizens and themes relevant to their everyday lives and perceptions of citizenship. Thus, the distinction commonly drawn between ‘data rich’ governments, institutions and commercial enterprises, which collect, store and mine data, and ‘data poor’ individual citizens targeted by such efforts has been criticised for obscuring global inequities ( Ruckenstein and Schüll, 2017 ). This insight is highly relevant to humanitarian wearables, because it

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Four Conversations with Canadian Communications Officers
Dominique Marshall

Tiessen , R. and Huish , R. (eds), Globetrotting or Global Citizenship? Perils and Potential of International Experiential Learning ( Toronto : University of Toronto Press ), pp. 230 – 57 . Glassford , S. ( 2018 ), Mobilizing Mercy: A History of the Canadian Red Cross ( Montreal and Kingston : McGill-Queen’s University Press ). Herriman , M. ( 2021 ), ‘ Social Media and Charities in Canada ’, in Phillips , S. D. and Wyatt , B. (eds), Innovations: Change for Canada’s Voluntary and Nonprofit Sector

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Lewis Hine’s Photographs of Refugees for the American Red Cross, 1918–20
Sonya de Laat

( Gutman, 1967 : 14). Hine’s skills would prove invaluable for shining light on civilians’ wartime need; they were equally instrumental in making the ARC shine as American’s preeminent relief agency. It was the Great War that created stateless persons, making stark the emerging reality that rights were not inhered in the person, as has been the central tenet of European philosophy since the time of the French Revolution. Rights were increasingly tied to citizenship ( Ngai, 2004 ; see also Hunt, 2007 ). For many in today’s world it is difficult to imagine anything

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
German Responses to the June 2019 Mission of the Sea-Watch 3
Klaus Neumann

’, Citizenship Studies , 20 : 5 , 561 – 78 . Stierl , M. ( 2018 ), ‘ A Fleet of Mediterranean Border Humanitarians ’, Antipode , 50 : 3 , 704 – 24 . Tazzioli , M. ( 2018 ), ‘ Crimes of Solidarity: Migration and Containment through Rescue ’, Radical Philosophy , 2 : 01 , 4 – 10 . Tazzioli , M. and Walters , W. ( 2019 ), ‘ Migration, Solidarity and the Limits of Europe ’, Global Discourse , 9 : 1 , 175 – 90 . Weise , K. , Kain , F. and Solms-Laubach , F. ( 2019 ), ‘ Verbrecherin oder Vorbild? ’, Bild 1 July . Zweites

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs