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Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

(frequently) variable ways (see also Jarvis and Lister 2015a ). In order to assess these impacts upon security and citizenship more specifically, this chapter offers a brief overview of our own approach to these complex and contested concepts. We begin by exploring how recent scholarship on security has sought, first, to escape the state-centrism of earlier work in this area and, second, to examine the

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Authors: Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

This book explores how different publics make sense of and evaluate anti-terrorism powers within the UK, and the implications of this for citizenship and security.

Since 9/11, the UK’s anti-terrorism framework has undergone dramatic changes, including with the introduction of numerous new pieces of legislation. Drawing on primary empirical research, this book examines the impact of these changes on security and citizenship, as perceived by citizens themselves. We examine such impacts on different communities within the UK, and find that generally, whilst white individuals were not unconcerned about the effects of anti-terrorism, ethnic minority citizens (and not Muslim communities alone) believe that anti-terrorism measures have had a direct, negative impact on various dimensions of their citizenship and security.

This book thus offers the first systematic engagement with ‘vernacular’ or ‘everyday’ understandings of anti-terrorism policy, citizenship and security. Beyond an empirical analysis of citizen attitudes, it argues that while transformations in anti-terrorism frameworks impact on public experiences of security and citizenship, they do not do so in a uniform, homogeneous, or predictable manner. At the same time, public understandings and expectations of security and citizenship themselves shape how developments in anti-terrorism frameworks are discussed and evaluated. The relationships between these phenomenon, in other words, are both multiple and co-constitutive. By detailing these findings, this book adds depth and complexity to existing studies of the impact of anti-terrorism powers.

The book will be of interest to a wide range of academic disciplines including Political Science, International Relations, Security Studies and Sociology.

Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

This chapter follows the previous discussion of public evaluations of anti-terrorism powers by examining the impact thereof on citizens and citizenship more specifically. Two main findings from our research are discussed. First, that anti-terrorism powers have impacted – variably – on four key aspects of citizenship: rights, participation, identity and duties. As

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Andreas Fischer- Lescano

differentiated legal form (referred to by Marx as the commodity form;20 Menke, by contrast, melds the legal subject to the subject of the homo politicus, to the political community: legal equality and the political equality of the citizens, he argues, are interdependent. Yet this conjunction between law and political equality of the citizens is hard to reconcile with the reality of the social creation of law. If, on the one hand, what Menke conceives as citizenship or membership of a polity is a purely formal determination, any contractual relationship is necessarily at once

in Law and violence
Abstract only
Lindsey Dodd

remains that French civil defence measures were far from complete when war broke out. In all countries, civil defence required the contribution of private individuals to collective – local and ultimately national – security; in France it was tied to ‘a tradition that included national defence as part of every citizen’s responsibility’ going back to the levée en masse.2 As Grayzel and Noakes have demonstrated, civil defence extended the category of active citizenship beyond the men called upon to go and fight. Women were deeply implicated, but so were children, in what

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
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Christoph Menke

non-​legal forces of “distraction” –​of obliviousness, refusal, and incapacity. In this counteraction of the forces of distraction, the identity of self and law to which the autonomous law curses us –​the identity of self and law that every one of us must perpetually assert against him- or herself as a non-​ citizen in order to thereby subject themselves afresh into citizenship as equal participation in law –​breaks apart. The self-​reflective implementation of law bursts the autonomous identity of self and law and lends full expression to the contradiction, which

in Law and violence
Naomi Head

legitimacy regarding the use of force. Communicative ethics does not seek to replace legal and moral discourses of legitimation. Instead, it focuses on the communicative practices which constitute the claims to legitimacy. This chapter explores two concepts popular within a broadly normative school of thought, ‘good international citizenship’ and the ‘responsibility to protect

in Justifying violence
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Humanity and relief in war and peace
Rebecca Gill

’s political participation. 15 In retrospect, she also made a similar claim for her work in the South African War, something she had not pressed at the time. These examples of voluntary work at home and in the colonies provided a model of women’s active citizenship now that the vote had been secured. Indeed, as this book has repeatedly shown, relief work was a prominent arena for promoting national

in Calculating compassion
Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

In preceding chapters, we explored the different ways in which citizens conceive of security and insecurity, and the ways in which anti-terrorism powers are interpreted and evaluated by UK publics, including in relation to their impacts on aspects of citizenship. In this chapter, we now bring these analyses together, examining the relationship between conceptions or

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Abstract only
Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

; Sivanandan 2006 ; Waldron 2003 ) have pointed, in contrast, to the pernicious implications of such measures for fundamental principles of democratic life, decrying those agitating for their sacrifice in a misguided quest for greater security. Why citizenship? Why security? For a book concerned with the development and experience of anti

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security