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Abstract only
David Geiringer

after death. 29 Appleby’s sardonic summary of Catholicism captured a number of aspects of his historical setting – a rising consciousness of a decline in the Christian faith (sociologists such as Peter Berger were predicting the ‘death of religion’ by the end of the century), a wider cold-war concern over the destruction

in The Pope and the pill
Abstract only
Carmen Mangion

without an explicit link to feminism. 53 Religion was relevant to and influenced by the post-war world. Hugh McLeod points to a national Christian identity that both the Second World War and the Cold War encouraged in Western nations. He highlights continued church-building, Christian socialisation in schools and confessional identities into the 1960s. 54 Church attendance, though, was declining; this religious world appeared in competition with an affluent 1950s and 1960s culture and its materialistic world of leisure and consumerism. 55 The narratives of the 1950s

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Carmen Mangion

-up mass protests, local, national and international, emerging out of student and worker movements, anti-nuclear and anti-war demonstrations and the civil, women’s and gay rights rallies that took place from the late 1950s into the 1970s. 5 Protests gave voice to many who felt unrepresented in social and political spheres. 6 One scholar has suggested that the Cold War emphasis on freedom and democracy ‘led [the] young to expect democratic institutions to live up to their democratic rhetoric’. 7 Many uprisings reflected a frustration and discontent, built up over time

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age