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Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

6 Creative survival as subversion I Solidarities and creative tactics against ‘conditions of death’1 n the DRC, the exercise and consolidation of state authority does not necessarily imply social transformation or a real commitment of the state to impose itself but, rather, the management of state absences and state presences through a plurality of authorities. Still, the patterns of coercion and extraction that have followed from the 20 years of conflict, with the different state-making and peacebuilding processes, determine the conditions for the

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Humour, subjectivity and the everyday
Alister Wedderburn

‘perform[s] subjects in creative, vital terms’ ( Brassett, 2016 : 171). Like the examples discussed in these pieces, Foucault’s laugh produces and makes legible a new subjective orientation. Yet it also reveals something about the instability and indeterminacy of his broader epistemological and relational terrain – terrain whose terms of belonging help to determine what kind of being is able to claim the status of ‘subject’ in the first place. Laughter is for Foucault a way into the problem of order, a way to acknowledge the boundary line separating the subjective realm

in Humour, subjectivity and world politics
Imaging the human body in drone warfare
Svea Braeunert

the technology, and they started doing tests in the studio. The finished works were dye sub printed onto the textile at 300 dpi (standard printing resolution) and fitted onto light boxes, illuminated from behind.’ M. Kuo, ‘Creative suite’, in B. Ruf and A. Hochdörfer (eds), Seth Price: Social Synthetic (Cologne: Walther König, 2017) , 362. 27 E. Halter, ‘Seth Price: A new suite of works from the “Uncanny Valley”’, 4 Columns (8 June, 2018) , http://4columns.org/halter-ed/seth-price (accessed 8 December, 2019). 28 Didactic on the occasion of the

in Drone imaginaries
Abstract only
Clowning and mass protest
Alister Wedderburn

across borders even as they prioritise people’s immediate and specific needs. 2 The aim is not to oppose market-led globalisation by doubling down on existing local or national identities, but rather by creatively enacting new alliances and associations both locally and across borders, in ways that elude the disciplinary demands of capital. In pursuing these goals, many within the movement have looked beyond traditional methods of mass protest in favour of a playful aestheticism and theatricality: what the Trapese Collective call ‘cultural activism’ ( 2007 ; cf

in Humour, subjectivity and world politics
Abstract only
Alister Wedderburn

. ( 1984 : 29–30) The parasite’s appeals to humour cannot therefore ‘tabulate’ a space, or ‘impose’ form and order. As ‘play’, as interference, as ‘noise’, they merely excite the system, and introduce a creative indeterminacy and contingency into its circuitry. In so doing, however, they demand (and perform) a reconsideration of what ‘international relations’ are, where they are to be found and who participates in them. Second, humour’s status as a tactical ‘way of operating’ – as a practice that discloses information about people’s identities; their positions in

in Humour, subjectivity and world politics
Abstract only
James Johnson

AI systems are limited as to what they can infer from particular data-sets because of the relatively few higher-level mathematical concepts on which computational-learning theory is derived. David Deutsch, “Creative Blocks,” Aeon , October 3, 2012, https://aeon.co/essays/how-close-are-we-to-creating-artificial-intelligence (accessed December 10, 2019). 47 Domingos, “A Few Useful Things to Know About Machine Learning,” pp. 78–88. 48 Technical

in Artificial intelligence and the future of warfare
Abstract only
Alister Wedderburn

properly political speech is impossible; a way of acting when meaningful agency is otherwise denied. In ancient poetry and drama, this function is embodied by the parasite. The parasite stages an encounter across the boundary between subject and abject, troubling the processes through which both categories are defined, circumscribed and secured. She thus offers a lens through which to think about how humour might ‘operate’ productively, creatively and transversally, opening up insights into the everyday politics of exclusion and struggle that underpin a number of

in Humour, subjectivity and world politics
James Johnson

of AI for national security and for strategic stability between great military powers (see chapter 4 ). US analysts and policy-makers have suggested a range of possible responses to these emerging security threats to preserve US technological leadership, which harnesses US natural advantages to push back against the rising great military powers in the multipolar order. 21 First, the DoD should fund and lead AI-simulated war games and red-teaming creative thinking exercises, to investigate existing

in Artificial intelligence and the future of warfare
Drone swarming and hypersonic weapons
James Johnson

’s ability to autonomously detect and cue precision missile munitions, especially in cluttered and complex environments. This weakness is caused partly by the poorly understood nature of AI’s ability to mimic human vision and cognition. David Deutsch, “Creative Blocks,” Aeon October 3, 2012, https://aeon.co/essays/how-close-are-we-to-creating-artificial-intelligence (accessed September 10, 2019). 83 Long and Green, “Stalking the Secure Second Strike: Intelligence, Counterforce

in Artificial intelligence and the future of warfare
James Johnson

deliberate, not unintentional on the part of the initiator (State A). 34 For analysis on this point, see Martin Libicki, “A hacker way of warfare,” in Nicholas D. Wright (ed.), AI, China, Russia, and the Global Order: Technological, Political, Global, and Creative Perspectives , Strategic Multilayer Assessment Periodic Publication (Washington, DC: Department of Defense, December 2018), pp. 128–132. 35 AI experts have proven that even when data appears accurate

in Artificial intelligence and the future of warfare