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Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

6 Creative survival as subversion I Solidarities and creative tactics against ‘conditions of death’1 n the DRC, the exercise and consolidation of state authority does not necessarily imply social transformation or a real commitment of the state to impose itself but, rather, the management of state absences and state presences through a plurality of authorities. Still, the patterns of coercion and extraction that have followed from the 20 years of conflict, with the different state-making and peacebuilding processes, determine the conditions for the

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Critical post-Soviet Marxist reflections

The starting-point for the book is its chapter on methodology. Found here are not only critiques of conventional Soviet Marxism-Leninism and post-modernism, but also a new rethinking of the classic dialectic. For the most part, however, the book focuses on revealing the new quality now assumed by commodities, money, and capital within the global economy. The market has become not only global, but a totalitarian force that is not a ‘socially neutral mechanism of coordination’. It is now a product of the hegemony of corporate capital, featuring the growth of new types of commodity: information, simulacra, and so forth. The book demonstrates the new qualities acquired by value, use value, price, and commodity fetishism within this new market, while exploring the contradictions of non-limited resources (such as knowledge) and the commodity form of their existence.

Money is now a virtual product of fictitious financial capital, possessing a new nature, contradictions, and functions. This analysis of the new nature of money helps to reveal the essence of so-called financialisation.

Capital has become the result of a complex system of exploitation. In the twenty-first-century context this exploitation includes the ‘classic’ extraction of surplus value from industrial workers combined with internal corporate redistribution of income by ‘insiders’; international exploitation; and the exploitation of creative labour through the expropriation of intellectual rent.

Aleksander Buzgalin and Andrey Kolganov

Capital of the twenty-first century as a dialectical negation of the previous evolution of capitalism: relations of exploitation Before reviewing the most modern forms of exploitation involving the subordination of creative activity to capital, we should stress that modern capitalism is a complex system involving all the basic ‘layers’ of interaction between labour and capital, in their modern spatial reality, that characterise the historical evolution of the capitalist mode of production. 1

in Twenty-first-century capital
Humour, subjectivity and the everyday
Alister Wedderburn

‘perform[s] subjects in creative, vital terms’ ( Brassett, 2016 : 171). Like the examples discussed in these pieces, Foucault’s laugh produces and makes legible a new subjective orientation. Yet it also reveals something about the instability and indeterminacy of his broader epistemological and relational terrain – terrain whose terms of belonging help to determine what kind of being is able to claim the status of ‘subject’ in the first place. Laughter is for Foucault a way into the problem of order, a way to acknowledge the boundary line separating the subjective realm

in Humour, subjectivity and world politics
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Limits of the market and capital
Aleksander Buzgalin and Andrey Kolganov

creative labour; the expansion of unalienated social relations in the field of joint creative activity (free working associations of scholars, of teachers, and of activists in social networks); new phenomenon of wikinomics (Tapscott and Williams 2007 ); and copyleft and other important components of economic life in the epoch of the rise of post-industrial society (the epoch of the scientific-technical revolution). No less interesting is the question of how to assess the socio-economic, humanitarian-economic, and environmental-economic effectiveness of self

in Twenty-first-century capital
Imaging the human body in drone warfare
Svea Braeunert

the technology, and they started doing tests in the studio. The finished works were dye sub printed onto the textile at 300 dpi (standard printing resolution) and fitted onto light boxes, illuminated from behind.’ M. Kuo, ‘Creative suite’, in B. Ruf and A. Hochdörfer (eds), Seth Price: Social Synthetic (Cologne: Walther König, 2017) , 362. 27 E. Halter, ‘Seth Price: A new suite of works from the “Uncanny Valley”’, 4 Columns (8 June, 2018) , http://4columns.org/halter-ed/seth-price (accessed 8 December, 2019). 28 Didactic on the occasion of the

in Drone imaginaries
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Clowning and mass protest
Alister Wedderburn

across borders even as they prioritise people’s immediate and specific needs. 2 The aim is not to oppose market-led globalisation by doubling down on existing local or national identities, but rather by creatively enacting new alliances and associations both locally and across borders, in ways that elude the disciplinary demands of capital. In pursuing these goals, many within the movement have looked beyond traditional methods of mass protest in favour of a playful aestheticism and theatricality: what the Trapese Collective call ‘cultural activism’ ( 2007 ; cf

in Humour, subjectivity and world politics
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Alister Wedderburn

. ( 1984 : 29–30) The parasite’s appeals to humour cannot therefore ‘tabulate’ a space, or ‘impose’ form and order. As ‘play’, as interference, as ‘noise’, they merely excite the system, and introduce a creative indeterminacy and contingency into its circuitry. In so doing, however, they demand (and perform) a reconsideration of what ‘international relations’ are, where they are to be found and who participates in them. Second, humour’s status as a tactical ‘way of operating’ – as a practice that discloses information about people’s identities; their positions in

in Humour, subjectivity and world politics
Sam King

the degree that intelligence is increasingly incorporated into machines, so the unity between mental and manual aspects of labouring is broken. Workers are deprived of mental challenges or creative possibilities. They become mere machine operators, appendages of the machines rather than masters of their fates and fortunes. 35

in Imperialism and the development myth
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James Johnson

AI systems are limited as to what they can infer from particular data-sets because of the relatively few higher-level mathematical concepts on which computational-learning theory is derived. David Deutsch, “Creative Blocks,” Aeon , October 3, 2012, https://aeon.co/essays/how-close-are-we-to-creating-artificial-intelligence (accessed December 10, 2019). 47 Domingos, “A Few Useful Things to Know About Machine Learning,” pp. 78–88. 48 Technical

in Artificial intelligence and the future of warfare