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Regimental chapel (formerly the chapel of St John the Baptist and then the Derby chapel). It was paid for by officers of the Manchester Regiment and dedicated on 5 July 1966 in commemoration of Manchester’s part in two World Wars and in memory of Sir Hubert Worthington, whose eighty-sixth birthday it would have been. The design was by Hazel Margaret Traherne (1919–2006), a textile and stained glass artist who over a long creative life concentrated increasingly on the use of colour as her primary focus. She worked with many

in Manchester Cathedral

Committee, and was convinced of the importance of church schools in Manchester, not least because they were a vital point of contact for the church with a society which was increasingly multi-religious and multi-cultural. He was, by all accounts, a creative and imaginative teacher, whose usual Sunday sermons were often ‘somewhat opaque’, except on those occasions when he was preaching to children and adopted some brilliantly ingenious device to illustrate a particular point. 16 Waddington’s lasting innovation was probably

in Manchester Cathedral
John Heywood’s The Pardoner and the Friar
Greg Walker

lost their capacity to bring order, while anarchy and violence prevail. The play offered Heywood an opportunity to reflect creatively upon, and attempt to digest, the implications of the troubled and troubling times in which he was living. Within months he would return to these themes – religious and social discord, the role of conventional authorities in the wake of the Royal Supremacy – to craft a more measured, allegorically sophisticated and ‘merry’ response to the national cataclysm in The Play of the Weather . 14

in Enacting the Bible in medieval and early modern drama
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A world of difference
Morny Joy

early work inspired a number of women scholars to drastically reappraise the western philosophical heritage from its beginnings. In Religious Studies, it also prompted women to develop their own critical analyses and creative experimentations, especially in reaction to the traditional formulas of philosophy of religion. The different works of Pamela Anderson (1998), Amy Hollywood (1998), Pamela Huntington (1998) and Grace Jantzen (1999) all exhibit the influence of Irigaray’s initiative, but certain of their responses have varied, as they have become aware of the

in Divine love
Heather Walton

debates concerning appropriate relations between literature and theology are not a primary concern. There are many reasons why this is so. Chief among these is the fact that literature written by women is so rich in its references to the divine. Early works of feminist criticism celebrated the discovery of this remarkable spiritual legacy and demonstrated how the spiritual radicalism of women’s creative writing posed a direct challenge to the conventions of domestic piety usually deemed appropriate to women. For this reason women authors often found it necessary to

in Literature, theology and feminism
Heather Walton

conventions of traditional academic discourse (again, see Braidotti 1991: 165). Ironically, it is partly because their work has blurred the distinctions between theory (assumed to be empirically grounded) and fiction (assumed to be imaginative construction) that they were initially greeted with such misunderstanding by English-speaking feminists. For example, Hélène Cixous’ rhetorical calls for women to write their bodies (1975a) were read quite literally as a call for women to abandon the picket line or political meeting for the creative writing class. They were thus

in Literature, theology and feminism
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Emmanuel Levinas and Irigaray
Morny Joy

roles of women within the confines of an orthodox Jewish position. Irigaray disputes Levinas’s portrayal of maternity and fecundity. She faults Levinas for viewing the child as the main creative outcome of love, rather than viewing love as creative in its own right. Irigaray is just as apprehensive of possessive pleasure as Levinas, and would agree with his attempts to free it of compulsive romanticism. Irigaray’s concern is that marriage, within religious traditions, is none the less principally mandated to reproduction. While she does not reject the outcome of

in Divine love
Morny Joy

envisioning alternative creative configurations. It is from Sexes and Genealogies (1993b) onward that Irigaray adopts a more dynamic notion of the imagination, with its own generative capacity. It is this innovative notion of imagination that she invokes when proposing the idea of women becoming divine. Irigaray’s appeal to an active imagination, while it rereads the past, also envisages new explorations or expressions of being and acting for women. Her work in this area is both provocative and suggestive of ways that women can indeed change the world, or forge a new era of

in Divine love
David Geiringer

women did, though, encounter a very particular set of concerns and questions relating to their faith. The interviewees’ memories of early marriage were defined by a tension between the physical, bodily concerns of sexuality and the transcendent, ethereal domain of religious beliefs. Amidst the daily pressures that this schism exerted on them, they did not forgo their faith or relationships, but pursued creative

in The Pope and the pill
Palestine– Israel in British universities
Author: Ruth Sheldon

For over four decades, events in Palestine-Israel have provoked raging conflicts between members of British universities, giving rise to controversies around free speech, ‘extremism’, antisemitism and Islamophobia within higher education, which have been widely reported in the media and subject to repeated interventions by politicians. But why is this conflict so significant for student activists living at such a geographical distance from the region itself? And what role do emotive, polarised communications around Palestine-Israel play in the life of British academic institutions committed to the ideal of free expression?

This book invites students, academics and members of the public who feel concerned with this issue to explore the sources of these visceral encounters on campus. Drawing on original ethnographic research with conflicting groups of activists, it explores what is at stake for students who are drawn into struggles around Palestine-Israel within changing university spaces facing pressures associated with neoliberalism and the ‘War on Terror’. It begins from this case study to argue that, in an increasingly globalised world that is shaped by entangled histories of the Nazi Holocaust and colonial violence, members of universities must develop creative and ethical ways of approaching questions of justice.

Tragic Encounters and Ordinary Ethics curates an ethnographic imagination in response to the political tensions arising out of the continuing violence in Palestine-Israel. It invites students and academics to attend to lived experiences within our own university institutions in order to cultivate ethical forms of communication in response to conflicts of justice.