Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 157 items for :

  • Manchester Religious Studies x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only

Regimental chapel (formerly the chapel of St John the Baptist and then the Derby chapel). It was paid for by officers of the Manchester Regiment and dedicated on 5 July 1966 in commemoration of Manchester’s part in two World Wars and in memory of Sir Hubert Worthington, whose eighty-sixth birthday it would have been. The design was by Hazel Margaret Traherne (1919–2006), a textile and stained glass artist who over a long creative life concentrated increasingly on the use of colour as her primary focus. She worked with many

in Manchester Cathedral

Committee, and was convinced of the importance of church schools in Manchester, not least because they were a vital point of contact for the church with a society which was increasingly multi-religious and multi-cultural. He was, by all accounts, a creative and imaginative teacher, whose usual Sunday sermons were often ‘somewhat opaque’, except on those occasions when he was preaching to children and adopted some brilliantly ingenious device to illustrate a particular point. 16 Waddington’s lasting innovation was probably

in Manchester Cathedral
Abstract only
A world of difference
Morny Joy

early work inspired a number of women scholars to drastically reappraise the western philosophical heritage from its beginnings. In Religious Studies, it also prompted women to develop their own critical analyses and creative experimentations, especially in reaction to the traditional formulas of philosophy of religion. The different works of Pamela Anderson (1998), Amy Hollywood (1998), Pamela Huntington (1998) and Grace Jantzen (1999) all exhibit the influence of Irigaray’s initiative, but certain of their responses have varied, as they have become aware of the

in Divine love
Heather Walton

debates concerning appropriate relations between literature and theology are not a primary concern. There are many reasons why this is so. Chief among these is the fact that literature written by women is so rich in its references to the divine. Early works of feminist criticism celebrated the discovery of this remarkable spiritual legacy and demonstrated how the spiritual radicalism of women’s creative writing posed a direct challenge to the conventions of domestic piety usually deemed appropriate to women. For this reason women authors often found it necessary to

in Literature, theology and feminism
Heather Walton

conventions of traditional academic discourse (again, see Braidotti 1991: 165). Ironically, it is partly because their work has blurred the distinctions between theory (assumed to be empirically grounded) and fiction (assumed to be imaginative construction) that they were initially greeted with such misunderstanding by English-speaking feminists. For example, Hélène Cixous’ rhetorical calls for women to write their bodies (1975a) were read quite literally as a call for women to abandon the picket line or political meeting for the creative writing class. They were thus

in Literature, theology and feminism
Abstract only
Emmanuel Levinas and Irigaray
Morny Joy

roles of women within the confines of an orthodox Jewish position. Irigaray disputes Levinas’s portrayal of maternity and fecundity. She faults Levinas for viewing the child as the main creative outcome of love, rather than viewing love as creative in its own right. Irigaray is just as apprehensive of possessive pleasure as Levinas, and would agree with his attempts to free it of compulsive romanticism. Irigaray’s concern is that marriage, within religious traditions, is none the less principally mandated to reproduction. While she does not reject the outcome of

in Divine love
Morny Joy

envisioning alternative creative configurations. It is from Sexes and Genealogies (1993b) onward that Irigaray adopts a more dynamic notion of the imagination, with its own generative capacity. It is this innovative notion of imagination that she invokes when proposing the idea of women becoming divine. Irigaray’s appeal to an active imagination, while it rereads the past, also envisages new explorations or expressions of being and acting for women. Her work in this area is both provocative and suggestive of ways that women can indeed change the world, or forge a new era of

in Divine love
David Geiringer

women did, though, encounter a very particular set of concerns and questions relating to their faith. The interviewees’ memories of early marriage were defined by a tension between the physical, bodily concerns of sexuality and the transcendent, ethereal domain of religious beliefs. Amidst the daily pressures that this schism exerted on them, they did not forgo their faith or relationships, but pursued creative

in The Pope and the pill
John Carter Wood

age. Humanity now had an ‘unlimited’ energy source without knowing what to do with it. 65 The atomic bomb, Bliss wrote, symbolised science’s amplification of human power, showing that its place in society had to be rethought in cooperation with scientists and in the light of a clear Church stance towards ‘the creative possibilities of man’s nature’. 66 Science for the sake of truth – or scientific knowledge that could minister to ‘human needs’, ameliorate ‘the human lot’ or enlarge ‘human possibilities’ – should be welcomed; yoked to the pursuit of power, however

in This is your hour

Religion and life cycles in early modern England examines intersections between religion and all stages of the life course. It considers rites of passage that shaped an individual’s life, such as birth, death, marriage and childbirth. It investigates everyday lived experiences including attending school and church, going to work, praying, writing letters and singing hymns. It sets examples from different contexts alongside each other and traces how different religious confessions were impacted by the religious and political changes that occurred in the two centuries following the Reformation. These approaches demonstrate the existence of multiple and overlapping understandings of the life cycle in early modern England. The collection is structured around three phases: birth, childhood and youth; adulthood and everyday life; and the dying and the dead. Coexisting with the bodily life cycle were experiences which formed the social life cycle such as schooling, joining a profession, embarking on travel abroad, marriage, parenthood and widowhood. Woven through these occurrences, an individual’s religious life cycle can be seen: the occasions when they were welcomed into a particular faith; when they were tempted to convert; when they joined the ministry or a convent. Early modern individuals often reflected on times they personally acknowledged to have transformed their life or events which instigated their spiritual awakening. They did so creatively in diaries, letters, plays, portraits, diagrams, sermons, poetry and hymns. In this interdisciplinary collection, the complex meanings of life-cycle events for early modern people are shown to be shaped by religious belief and experience.